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Thread: straight ploughing tips

  1. #1
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    straight ploughing tips

    well like it says above, tips for straight ploughing? one of the jobs i hate most on the farm but it should be enjoyable. Doesnt matter how hard i concentrate or how straight i start there always seems to be a big dog leg in it.

    tia

    HB

  2. #2
    Member Niels's Avatar
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    Re: straight ploughing tips

    Get a vari width? I don't know all the right technical ploughing terms in English. Check if it's running level both side to side and front to rear. Check if it doesn't push the tractor left or right, don't put to much pressure on the depth wheel, check your top link. I tend to take small bends out just by steering a little left or right. If it gets worse use the vari width. I'm not a perfect ploughman, by far, but usually am able of leaving a reasonable result. Still one of the most enjoyable jobs on the farm me thinks. Setting up a plough properly is something you either can master or can't. I always got on well with our Rabe, Kverneland and Rumptstad. The biggest issue is usually that people buy a plough and reckon its set up perfect from the factory! When your going up and down the furrow you might as well hop out every now and then to get some fresh air and make some adjustments to see if you can get it any better. Usually it gets worse and you turn it back. Watch and learn proccess and when you get it right most enjoyable!

  3. #3
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    Re: straight ploughing tips

    Aim at something in the distance and drive straight at it. Do not do what a friend of mine did and aim at a cow in the next field.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Mr Noo's Avatar
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    Re: straight ploughing tips

    Quote Originally Posted by NewQman View Post
    Aim at something in the distance and drive straight at it. Do not do what a friend of mine did and aim at a cow in the next field.
    Had the same here, with drilling, chap saw a lump at far hedge, aimed at it only to realise it was a pheasant, never lived that one down!!!
    I think the secret is to get the plough set up spot on, pulling true, easier said than done esp with various soil types over the length of a field.

  5. #5
    Senior Member YardofTruth's Avatar
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    Re: straight ploughing tips

    Make sure you are straight when you drop the plough and again when you pick it up at the far end.

  6. #6
    Senior Member deere2140's Avatar
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    Re: straight ploughing tips

    Better to have 3 points in a line . One is your eye , second is something away in the distance , third something in between . Keep the second and third in line and you will keep straight .
    The views posted are mine and not those of my employers

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    Re: straight ploughing tips

    Maybe its my imagination but if you start ploughing with a slight curve, a well set plough will nearly straighten out the run eventually. As one poster already stated - ensure the tractor is straight when you raise and lower the plough at the ends.

  8. #8
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    Re: straight ploughing tips

    look at you top link when the plough is in work
    it should run straight
    if it isnt
    the plough offset needs adjusting
    if there is no offset adjustment
    the wheel track is wrong
    the check chains are of course slack
    tight and the plough can crab
    if its any consolation
    i cant keep a straight furrow either
    my excuse is that i have no level land

  9. #9
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    Re: straight ploughing tips

    a q for you cork
    taberna is listed as the best standing barley in the recommended list
    yet one of the tallest crops i sprayed last year was taberna
    so tall in fact
    it had to be sprayed with pgr

  10. #10
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    Re: straight ploughing tips

    Get a good ploughman to go with you for a few hours.A well set plough is quite easy to keep straight.

  11. #11

    Re: straight ploughing tips

    Quote Originally Posted by CORK View Post
    Maybe its my imagination but if you start ploughing with a slight curve, a well set plough will nearly straighten out the run eventually. As one poster already stated - ensure the tractor is straight when you raise and lower the plough at the ends.
    I had exactly same conversation with someone this morning... I never start straight.. Always plough up to hedge or track etc and by time I'm away across the field I'm pretty much straight without trying.. Strange...
    Like ploughing but my god how depressing watching the itself gauge and my new 710 trelliborgs gettin ripped to shreds.. Hopefully after this spring and with the claydon in she'd ready to go for this autumn I'll put plough back in nettles where I left it last spring hoping never to hook it on again..

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    Re: straight ploughing tips

    Was told last year by demo man too forget about toplink been straight .He said it would run straight on a smaller plough were furrows are equal both sides of centre but as you get more furrows it will go one way to side with most furrows.!

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    Re: straight ploughing tips

    Quote Originally Posted by Niteforce View Post
    Was told last year by demo man too forget about toplink been straight .He said it would run straight on a smaller plough were furrows are equal both sides of centre but as you get more furrows it will go one way to side with most furrows.!
    mmmmm i have seen some of the demo guys ploughing at certain ag shows

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    Re: straight ploughing tips

    Quote Originally Posted by Niteforce View Post
    Was told last year by demo man too forget about toplink been straight .He said it would run straight on a smaller plough were furrows are equal both sides of centre but as you get more furrows it will go one way to side with most furrows.!
    Doesnt really make sense to me although I dont confess to be a ploughing expert by any means.

    Surely, if the toplink isnt running in line with the tractor then the lower lift arms aren't pulling in line either - that can't be ideal in terms of spreading loads.....

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    Re: straight ploughing tips

    on the back of a van

    i'm so gay
    i cant even drive straight



    mmmm
    and does wobbely ploughing come into this?

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    Re: straight ploughing tips

    Quote Originally Posted by leashed View Post
    a q for you cork
    taberna is listed as the best standing barley in the recommended list
    yet one of the tallest crops i sprayed last year was taberna
    so tall in fact
    it had to be sprayed with pgr
    Hi Leashed,

    A very good question.

    Taberna isn't our variety but I must say that it isnt a bad one.

    I agree that it is the tallest variety on the market, however it does actually have a good resistance to lodging.

    Straw strenght in barley can be divided into 3 or 4 divisions in my opinion:

    1. Resistance to lodging by kinking of the stem
    2. Resistance to root ball lodging (where the roots actually twist over in wet soil - saw a lot of this in 2012)
    3. Resistance to brackling (straw breakdown), this usually happens when cereals get over ripe, the straw become brittle and breaks down in the field. Low potash also encourages this.
    4. Resistance to neck-break, neck break is where the last bit of the stem connected to the ear breaks resulting in the ear falling to the ground.

    Over the years, I've noticed that height in varieties isnt always directly linked to risk of lodging. Some tall varieties can actually be quite good to stand.

    However, in my mind, height will always mean that gravity will put more pressure on the plant - especially in lodging situations as described in point 2 above.

    I put shortener on spring barley last year for the first time (thick crop in a rich field following WOSR). Glad I did.

    Hope this helps...

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    Re: straight ploughing tips

    Get an on land plough and use RTK GPS steering on the tractor
    Is that the sun

  18. #18
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    Re: straight ploughing tips

    The first time my dad sent me out by myself he told me to pick something on the other end. Well we had a big hill in the middle so I picked a cloud. Learned that clouds move faster than you think.

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    Re: straight ploughing tips

    I always find it easier to keep straight by steering with the right hand. Obviously this creates problems as generally the left hand is on the wheel and the right hand operates the lift controls etc. But if you can go from one end to the other without tweaking the buttons , the right arm steers straighter for me anyway. probably I 'm unusual but I prefer to steer with right and look over left shoulder. one day tractors will have wireless control panels that you can place where you want in the cab!! I wish.

  20. #20
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    Re: straight ploughing tips

    Quote Originally Posted by hooby farmer View Post
    well like it says above, tips for straight ploughing? one of the jobs i hate most on the farm but it should be enjoyable. Doesnt matter how hard i concentrate or how straight i start there always seems to be a big dog leg in it.

    tia

    HB
    Unless I'm reading this wrong, your keeping fairly straight for a while then.....your getting a "big dog leg in it" seems your leaving corrections too late, keeping reosonably straight is fine if the soil is consistant but if there's inconsistantsy soil the plough obviosly wander, it's not rocket science, and as for the top link supposed to be centered, it needent be exact, one of the most important things is the front furrow width. thoughts?

  21. #21

    Re: straight ploughing tips

    Another thing to note when picking a point in the hedge / driving towards it, is try to keep your head still also, as a typical john deere driver, you oftne tend to line up the emblem on the bonnet with something, its very easy to move your head to one side, and think "oh shit" and correct..

    From what ive seen of bad examples of ploughing the main problem often isnt setting a straight line in the first place, but keeping it / preventing the ends for tailing off... if they do, its not hard to just put in a little short bout, and soon comes perfect again

  22. #22
    Senior Member track marshall's Avatar
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    Re: straight ploughing tips

    Get a tape measure out and measure the distance between the inside walls of the tyres, this measurement should be the same for the front and rear wheels.

  23. #23
    Senior Member track marshall's Avatar
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    Re: straight ploughing tips

    This is a very good guide

  24. #24

    Re: straight ploughing tips

    It dosnt need to be, thats why the plough has offset adjustment / angle adjustment....

  25. #25
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    Re: straight ploughing tips

    Quote Originally Posted by darrenjlobb View Post
    It dosnt need to be, thats why the plough has offset adjustment / angle adjustment....
    not all ploughs have offset adjustment

    cork
    i wondered about taberna
    it was remarkably tall last year
    on the other hand
    the chance i grew was a very very short straw
    that i thought would stand in a hurricane
    yet was only 6 inches off the ground when harvested

  26. #26
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    Re: straight ploughing tips

    First ensure the plough is set up correctly as per the handbook, inside tyre measurements etc, spring measurements, board to board, plough tilt when in furrow, etc etc etc. Ploughing from a straight fence or hedge is always an easy start option, although it is best to scratch out your headland mark first to you know when to drop and lift the plough. If you do not have a straight start then you need to open up, but don't open up using full depth, put a light scrath in first (Pick a fixed point in as far in the distance as you can) then asses the straightness of the scratch and you can then use that to give your first 'full' run. Once you get your straight set up you need to get the 'ins' and 'outs' correct. It can be easy to lose land at the ends and therefore get a bend approaching the ploughed land at the ends. If this is the case then you need to enter the furrow from the land side, not the ploughed, at an angle or around say 30 degrees trying to line it so the front wheel drops into the open fur, turn tight against the wall, until your back wheel (if you have judged correctly) comes over your headland scratch and is almost ready to drop into the open fur too. This is when you need to drop the plough in, if your back wheel is in the fur then you are too late and you will lose land and start a dog leg bend. At this point you need to asses your line, and decide which sections (if any) need to be straightened. Don't steer to heavily against the wall of the forrow, just hug loose (your plough is not set correctly if you need to hug too tight), gently steer against the wall (and use side brakes too if necessary) in areas that need more land taking on and steer gently towards the ploughing in areas that bend the other way. However try not to straighten things out when you are in the middle of your run as you'll never get it right, best to asses quickly when near the ends. Once you are generall straight you should be able to take your hands off the wheel and allow the tractor and plough to run itself, and you should also be able to hop off and detach the top link when the plough is in the furrow if you have things right. The ins and outs are the critical part, along with a straight eye, oh and practice!! Sorry for the long winded explaination.
    Last edited by abdn mac; 08-03-13 at 08:35 PM.

  27. #27
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    Re: straight ploughing tips

    Quote Originally Posted by abdn mac View Post
    First ensure the plough is set up correctly as per the handbook, inside tyre measurements etc, string measurements, board to board, plough tilt when in furrow, etc etc etc. Ploughing from a straight fence or hedge is always an easy start option, although it is best to scratch out your headland mark first to you know when to drop and lift the plough. If you do not have a straight start then you need to open up, but don't open up using full depth, put a light scrath in first (Pick a fixed point in as far in the distance as you can) then asses the straightness of the scratch and you can then use that to give your first 'full' run. Once you get your straight set up you need to get the 'ins' and 'outs' correct. It can be easy to lose land at the ends and therefore get a bend approaching the ploughed land at the ends. If this is the case then you need to enter the furrow from the land side, not the ploughed, at an angle or around say 30 degrees trying to line it so the front wheel drops into the open fur, turn tight against the wall, until your back wheel (if you have judged correctly) comes over your headland scratch and is almost ready to drop into the open fur too. This is when you need to drop the plough in, if your back wheel is in the fur then you are too late and you will lose land and start a dog leg bend. At this point you need to asses your line, and decide which sections (if any) need to be straightened. Don't steer to heavily against the wall of the forrow, just hug loose (your plough is not set correctly if you need to hug too tight), gently steer against the wall (and use side brakes too if necessary) in areas that need more land taking on and steer gently towards the ploughing in areas that bend the other way. However try not to straighten things out when you are in the middle of your run as you'll never get it right, best to asses quickly when near the ends. Once you are generall straight you should be able to take your hands off the wheel and allow the tractor and plough to run itself, and you should also be able to hop off and detach the lift arm when the plough is in the furrow if you have things right. The ins and outs are the critical part, along with a straight eye, oh and practice!! Sorry for the long winded explaination.
    good post
    how long did it take to write that?

  28. #28
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    Re: straight ploughing tips

    It took twice as long as it should've, as I clicked the wrong button to post it.....and it disappeared! ah well, re-type! lol

  29. #29

    Re: straight ploughing tips

    Google "Kverneland ploughing guide" for a good PDF guide that applies to nearly all ploughs.

    The thing that annoys me when ploughing with modern tractors is welded wheel rims
    and so the inside track width between front and rear wheels cannot be made equal,
    this is what causes many ploughs to crab across the field and constantly run "to land"

  30. #30
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    Re: straight ploughing tips

    Don't know what your all worrying about, When someone made a comment to an old neighbour about a bend in his ploughing, his reply was " Its no so bad whun baith ends dinny meet " Just keep her lit.

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