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Thread: Triticale

  1. #1
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    Triticale

    There doesn't seem to be much of this grown.

    It always looks good in trials plots - really vigorous.

    Apparently very competitive with grass weeds, can use Atlantis etc with it, not prone to disease and doesn't need as much fertiliser as wheat.

    Why don't more people grow it ??

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    Re: Triticale

    Quote Originally Posted by Massey View Post
    There doesn't seem to be much of this grown.

    It always looks good in trials plots - really vigorous.

    Apparently very competitive with grass weeds, can use Atlantis etc with it, not prone to disease and doesn't need as much fertiliser as wheat.

    Why don't more people grow it ??
    Try selling it.

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    Re: Triticale

    Try cutting it when its gone flat!! But main problem is selling it, I've grown couple of times organically but it never seems too feed very well to cows and not much yield last time, 30tons off 60acres after red clover and had spring oats do 2ton/acre 3rd year cereal so that made easy decision never again!

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    Re: Triticale

    You won't be able to sell triticale very easily, no one wants or really knows what it is. It can grow very leggy and it is far from totally disease resistant. The agronomy is ok though.

    Tough old stuff, same as rye.

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    Member choochter's Avatar
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    Re: Triticale

    If you milled it & propcorned it & fed it to store cattle, would it do the same job as barley?

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    Re: Triticale

    We used to grow 30 acres on our sand and crushed it through the roller in a mix for the cows. It yielded well and we never had much trouble with lodging, but the straw was very tough and non-absorbant which made it a pain in the neck.

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    Senior Member Spotty Dog's Avatar
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    Re: Triticale

    You can blend it away with group 4 feed wheat to sell it. Thats what merchants do i was once told.
    I combine some for a chap locally and it never seems at all competitive with grass weeds to me. It doesn't tiller well at all and only ever yields 2 or 2.5 t/acre.

  8. #8
    Member choochter's Avatar
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    Re: Triticale

    Does it not tolerate lower pH better than other cereals? And require less fertiliser?

  9. #9
    Senior Member davidroberts30's Avatar
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    Re: Triticale

    rabbits dont bother it

    a poor mans wheat

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    Re: Triticale

    Quote Originally Posted by davidroberts30 View Post
    rabbits dont bother it

    a poor mans wheat
    we've grown it before tremplin, doesn't need so much n will tolerate bad ground and rabbits don't touch it, but its not exactly in demand we've used it as a break . went with feed wheat but the straw went for thatching after some was cut with a binder and combed. its got more protein than rye and oats so ought t be in better demand but yield isn't high did around 2 ton.

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    Re: Triticale

    Loads of it grown around here in a livestock area on mostly acid soils, nearly all grown and fed back to stock often stored in a sausage. Cheaper to grow and usually stands up well, just had a UK farmer visiting us who grows it for thatching straw but cannot sell the grain easily.

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    Re: Triticale

    Quote Originally Posted by Uwork4menow View Post
    You won't be able to sell triticale very easily, no one wants or really knows what it is. It can grow very leggy and it is far from totally disease resistant. The agronomy is ok though.

    Tough old stuff, same as rye.
    Sold it easily, grain trader came and sampled it, thought it was wheat, so sold as feed wheat. Leggy? Yes, grew 4' high, except for a patch rabbits hammered in the Winter, which on grew to 3', all stood well. Yield 2.75 t/Acre, had about same N as barley. Rabbits left it alone after Winter. It was DD'd, as was the following crop, which was OSR, which did not grow through the Winter, I put that down to the aleopathic effect inherited from its rye parent. I should have followed it with beans. If I grew it again I'd graze the regrowth during the Winter with sheep and DD Spring beans.
    Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go

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    Re: Triticale

    Talking to a chap at Cereals who was promoting Triticale, he is of the opinion that the reason it is not easy to sell is because not enough of it is being grown to interest the millers. Apparently, they have to change something in the set up to mill Triticale. As there is not much grown, not much is therefore offered, and so it goes round and round. Bit of a chicken and egg situation.

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    Junior Member Donkey Oaty's Avatar
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    Re: Triticale

    It has use as game crop for pheasants. In fact I wouldn't mind a bag of home saved for about 3 acres for next year.........!

  15. #15

    Re: Triticale

    Quote Originally Posted by miketm150 View Post
    Try cutting it when its gone flat!! But main problem is selling it, I've grown couple of times organically but it never seems too feed very well to cows and not much yield last time, 30tons off 60acres after red clover and had spring oats do 2ton/acre 3rd year cereal so that made easy decision never again!

    Did you ever arable silage it?

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    Re: Triticale

    pellow

    Strange you should ask that

    I got of a forage harvester last week after chopping rye and triticale for a bio gas plant

    averaged out at
    rye - 46 tons per ha
    triticale - 58 tons per ha

    to make more cash than combining and selling the grain it had to average 40 tons per ha (fresh weight)
    One very happy farmer !!!!!

    Triticale is quiet common in our area as it seems to do well in light soils and little rain fall biggest market is animal feed and there is plenty of straw baled behind the combines


    Max
    Weiter, weiter ins Verderben,Wir müssen leben bis wir sterben

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    Re: Triticale

    Quote Originally Posted by pellow View Post
    Did you ever arable silage it?
    No, simply because of the grain/straw ratio being poor and leading to a low energy silage. And I struggle with getting enough energy so I don't need that diluting it!

  18. #18

    Re: Triticale

    What stage did you cut it Max? I've been told the best time to cut triticale for silage is just as the flag leaf has unrolled

  19. #19
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    Re: Triticale

    Quote Originally Posted by pellow View Post
    What stage did you cut it Max? I've been told the best time to cut triticale for silage is just as the flag leaf has unrolled
    What is the point of that? If you want something green and stalky grow IRG!

  20. #20
    Senior Member Phil's Avatar
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    Re: Triticale

    Quote Originally Posted by Uwork4menow View Post
    What is the point of that? If you want something green and stalky grow IRG!
    Exactly what I was thinking.

    We have grown Triticale, on & off, for well over 20 years.

    Don't be fooled in thinking that it is completely "Rabbit proof", As kpa has already stated...they will hammer it.
    We found, certainly with Winter Triticale, that the variety often made a difference. We never suffered any rabbit damage when we were growing Lasko & Purdy...but when we grew Taurus the rabbits almost destroyed the first 20 metres around the field ! They will also have a go at it if there is nothing else for them to eat (so a it like maize).
    We have some Spring triticale in this year, the variety is Dublet, the rabbits have not touched it...& it really is looking very well.

    Triticale is best suited to light land & the more marginal soils ! Some of our very light sands struggle to produce a decent crop of Barley, they certainly don't have enough "guts" to grow wheat.
    Triticale is very drought tolerant (Rye hybrid) & will produce some quite respectable yields from poor soils. We often had Winter triticale doing 2.5 to 2.8 tons/acre.
    The crop is very good at smothering weeds in the Early stages when it is "creeping around on the floor"...but it always looks a much thinner crop when it comes in to ear.
    It is always a good investment to put a robust growth regulator on it, and is also worth spending a bit on Fungicides. Triticale can often suffer from late ear diseases & sprouting in the ear.
    The grain is high in lysine, so very good for poultry.

    Grown using the right variety, inputs & management will often produce a sample that is hard to distinguish from wheat...so there is obviously a market for it.

    We feed a lot to the Pheasants.

  21. #21
    Senior Member Bald Rick's Avatar
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    Re: Triticale

    Ideal feed for pigs & poultry as it's higher in amino acids than wheat esp lysine. Used to sell all my crop by private contract at a premium but now going to switch to wholecrop.
    Used to be very resistant to all disease except eyespot but now seems to have succumbed to all the usual culprits - I suspect "improved" plant breeding the cause as Lasko was great excepting it fell over regularly without a PGR (& even sometimes with) and the yields weren't great.

    IIRC Guiness looked very closely at using it to make a brew but nothing came of it.

  22. #22
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    Re: Triticale

    Quote Originally Posted by Bald Rick View Post
    Ideal feed for pigs & poultry as it's higher in amino acids than wheat esp lysine. Used to sell all my crop by private contract at a premium but now going to switch to wholecrop.
    Used to be very resistant to all disease except eyespot but now seems to have succumbed to all the usual culprits - I suspect "improved" plant breeding the cause as Lasko was great excepting it fell over regularly without a PGR (& even sometimes with) and the yields weren't great.

    IIRC Guiness looked very closely at using it to make a brew but nothing came of it.

    Triticale contains anti-nutritional factors which limit its inclusion in non-ruminant diets.

    Don't be fooled into thinking that triticale is still some disease resistant monster, looking around the trial plots yesterday and some of it was pickled (Oakley proportions) in yellow rust. Now requires a sensible fungicide program I would say.

    Grows tall and strong, hence its suitability for thirsty land. I would be careful wholecropping it, if you left it to go too far it could become quite indigestible I reckon.

  23. #23
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    Re: Triticale

    How does it fare re take all and eyespot? ie is it a good 2nd or third cereal?

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    Re: Triticale

    Quote Originally Posted by Flat 10 View Post
    How does it fare re take all and eyespot? ie is it a good 2nd or third cereal?
    Don't bank on it!!

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    Re: Triticale

    Quote Originally Posted by Uwork4menow View Post
    Don't bank on it!!
    Wasn't! That's why I asked...............

  26. #26
    Senior Member Phil's Avatar
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    Re: Triticale

    Quote Originally Posted by Flat 10 View Post
    How does it fare re take all and eyespot? ie is it a good 2nd or third cereal?
    If levels of the take-all fungus are high in the soil Triticale will be affected far less than Wheat ! Winter Triticale & Winter Barley are both affected by take-all, Some varieties, of both Triticale & Barley, seem to be more "Tolerant" of Take-All than others.

    Although Triticale is tolerant to take-all it is still classed as a "white" straw crop....so it is not a "break-crop like Oats.

    As with Wheat & Barley, it is often the variety that has better resistance to certain diseases.

    With the Fungicides available these days Eyespot should not be a major concern - Proline 275 (Prothioconazole) is very effective against eyespot. That said, it may not have a label recommendation for use on Triticale ??

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    Re: Triticale

    if your going to try it, id suggest you try a little so you can get it away with/as wheat as we did, for there was no demand for it about here, its not the crop you shut the gate on and forget till harvest, although its a cross between wheat and rye you would need to look after it like wheat or barley and spend lots of money on it. The straw will not be as good as wheat straw and it wont yield anything like wheat, we grew a little for a few years but much prefere Winter Barley on the same ground.

  28. #28
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    Re: Triticale

    it's been grown organically quite well due to its competitiveness, but usually as a in house feed, when you give it N then you need to give it all the sprays too so maybe not suited to conventional systems over the Wheat/barley/oats. I've only seen it twice on organic farms when it was getting near matured and it looked sparse.. they did use students for rouging it

  29. #29
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    Re: Triticale

    It's not a break, it suffers with rusts in a dry year; the Trit in our trials was knobbled by yellow rust, contains trypsin inhibitors, tonnes of straw vs grain, conclusion= whats the point? Cost near the same as wheat and barley to grow, might as well grow them. It is possible to grow wheat for a sensible cost, certainly no more costly to grow than maize.

    If you want a fairly simple way forward, put in a short term IRG ley in the spring and undersow it with spring barley (or vice versa). One go with bit of hormone herbicide, maybe some fungicide and cut it off with a wholecrop header in July, fertilise and take a late second cut from the grass.

  30. #30

    Re: Triticale

    I know a buyer who buys it as wheat says its better bushel weight and as near to exactly the same as wheat!!!

    Have baled up triticale straw before seems to crop exceptionally well compared to wheat around these parts!!

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