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Thread: DIY Home brew Concrete

  1. #31
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    Re: DIY Home brew Concrete

    Quote Originally Posted by stu b View Post
    Reading this with interest.

    i was wondering if you could dig a small trench down both sides of the road a fill them with concrete. This would then harden and form two kerbs. You could then fill the centre with either concrete, Tarmac, plainings or stone depending on budget.
    The strength of the kerbs should prevent the type of problems you have been describing.
    1200 metres a 1 foot wide and 8 inches (20cm) deep will require 72 cubes per trench (108 cubes at a foot deep).

    1200m x 3m wide x 4inches deep (10cm) = 360 cubes (540 cubes at 6 inches deep)
    estimated costs 360 x 75 per cube = 27000 (540 x 75 = 40500)
    obv costs per cube on that quantity might be less but trying to show an example.

    trench costs:
    72 x 75 = 5400 per trench = 10800.

    you could then save on what you are going to put in the middle of the road.
    Very interesting concept Stu. Well worthy of further thought and investigation especially in the problem areas which are prone to pushing out.

    I saw something similar done on a local country back road that carried a lot of HGV traffic and was constantly collapsing out (mushrooming) and the council stabilised the sides by digging 1m deep trenches. about 450mm wide and back filled with HD concrete. Seems to have worked, but no traffice to the beet factory has led to a HGV drop off anyway. There were some engineers there last Summer doing bore holes before a resurfacing job and they could niot understand what they were trying to drill through.... :-D
    steveR formerly known as dexterbeef!

  2. #32
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    Re: DIY Home brew Concrete

    Quote Originally Posted by RED BULL View Post
    Tarmac like concrete is only as good as the base it's laid on and if your base isn't good enough for tarmac i very much doubt it's good enough for concrete.

    So if as you say the base isn't good enough for tarmac i wouldn't spend in excess of 50k on concrete without sorting the base out first.
    That's not correct, decent concrete is considerably more load bearing than tarmac which to be fair wouldn't be difficult as tarmac (especially a fine top coat) has next to no load bearing capability at all. Asphalt will carry load with a poorer base but you're in to silly money, for farm use concrete is the way to go 99% of the time.

  3. #33
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    Re: DIY Home brew Concrete

    Quote Originally Posted by wrsni View Post
    That's not correct, decent concrete is considerably more load bearing than tarmac which to be fair wouldn't be difficult as tarmac (especially a fine top coat) has next to no load bearing capability at all. Asphalt will carry load with a poorer base but you're in to silly money, for farm use concrete is the way to go 99% of the time.
    That is my understanding too. One only has to look at all the concrete farm roads put in over the years. In many case the substrate would not have been more than a bit of stone in potholes...

    IMO tarmac is really just a finishing or sealing surface.
    steveR formerly known as dexterbeef!

  4. #34
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    Re: DIY Home brew Concrete

    This gives some background to using the base and mixing with cement to set.
    Might be worth talking to them

    http://www.roadreclamation.co.uk/road.htm

  5. #35
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    Re: DIY Home brew Concrete

    Quote Originally Posted by rushes View Post
    This gives some background to using the base and mixing with cement to set.
    Might be worth talking to them

    http://www.roadreclamation.co.uk/road.htm
    Fascinating. Thank you!!

    Anyone seen this company's work or any similar outfits doing the same type of job?
    Last edited by steveR; 19-01-14 at 09:50 AM.
    steveR formerly known as dexterbeef!

  6. #36
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    Re: DIY Home brew Concrete

    Quote Originally Posted by steveR View Post

    Spoke to a civil engineer donkeys years ago, and he stated that if we put a 4" solid concrete top on the existing base the roadway would be more than adequate for farm traffic.
    Remember that donkeys years ago, farm traffic was Fergie 20's or maybe 65's with 3 ton trailers. Not 25 ton tractor trailer combo's running at 50kph

  7. #37
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    Re: DIY Home brew Concrete

    Quote Originally Posted by steveR View Post
    the lane simply mushrooms with the weight of vehicles.--Spoke to a civil engineer donkeys years ago, and he stated that if we put a 4" solid concrete top on the existing base the roadway would be more than adequate for farm traffic.
    Quote Originally Posted by PostHarvest View Post
    Remember that donkeys years ago, farm traffic was Fergie 20's or maybe 65's with 3 ton trailers. Not 25 ton tractor trailer combo's running at 50kph

    Needs a better sub base

  8. #38
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    Re: DIY Home brew Concrete

    Quote Originally Posted by PostHarvest View Post
    Remember that donkeys years ago, farm traffic was Fergie 20's or maybe 65's with 3 ton trailers. Not 25 ton tractor trailer combo's running at 50kph
    Well, a moderately aged Donkey anyway, the basic premise was that the base would take a concrete top and be suitable for farm use which includes 8 wheelers, (no Artics here!!) and 14t spud trailers. Gettin the rain off the track is the most important thing IMO.
    steveR formerly known as dexterbeef!

  9. #39
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    Re: DIY Home brew Concrete

    Best advice would be to do 100 mtrs and wait three weeks till it cures a bit and then hammer hell out of it and see if it stands up . here I would put down 7-8 ins concrete and leave the iron in China

  10. #40
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    Re: DIY Home brew Concrete

    Now been in touch with two companies offering grading and subsequent cement stabilisation of existing roadways.

    Now to await their visits to see the site and the quotes! Ball park is quite a bit less than full concrete road as you would imagine, probably 35-50% depending on the quality of the existing roadway and the hardcore already in place, also the soil type is relevant.

    Watch this space....
    steveR formerly known as dexterbeef!

  11. #41
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    Re: DIY Home brew Concrete

    Quote Originally Posted by steveR View Post
    Now been in touch with two companies offering grading and subsequent cement stabilisation of existing roadways.

    Now to await their visits to see the site and the quotes! Ball park is quite a bit less than full concrete road as you would imagine, probably 35-50% depending on the quality of the existing roadway and the hardcore already in place, also the soil type is relevant.

    Watch this space....
    Initial guide prices are for between 8-12/sqM for grading and subsequent cement stabilisation of the existing roadway. These are not definitive costings as the site/roadway needs to be visited for testin purposes.
    steveR formerly known as dexterbeef!

  12. #42
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    Re: DIY Home brew Concrete

    An interesting thread, (and not because I have any experience in this type of construction). To the OP have you considered the long term damage to the land for the gravel extraction? Would the gravel require screening to size it properly? (there is a chance you could be short of one size). Some of the farms around here that laid concrete properly (sometimes by MOD in the 40s) have had tracks that last a life time. Although it is a lot of you can offset some of the cost against all the future regular repair work to an aggregate track. If you did it in sections could you pass it off as repairs for tax purposes?
    Alternative might be to camber a decent track with road scalping laid as the weather heats up in the summer. The more accurately laid and compacted the less the chance of potholes. Fast driving and pooling water seems to me to be the biggest destroyer of aggregate surfaces.

  13. #43
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    Re: DIY Home brew Concrete

    Quote Originally Posted by essexpete View Post
    An interesting thread, (and not because I have any experience in this type of construction). To the OP have you considered the long term damage to the land for the gravel extraction? Would the gravel require screening to size it properly? (there is a chance you could be short of one size). Some of the farms around here that laid concrete properly (sometimes by MOD in the 40s) have had tracks that last a life time. Although it is a lot of you can offset some of the cost against all the future regular repair work to an aggregate track. If you did it in sections could you pass it off as repairs for tax purposes?
    Alternative might be to camber a decent track with road scalping laid as the weather heats up in the summer. The more accurately laid and compacted the less the chance of potholes. Fast driving and pooling water seems to me to be the biggest destroyer of aggregate surfaces.
    As the OP, I have to say I have found it an interesting thread with a mix of ideas and thoughts!

    Long term damage from removal of 1200t would be minimal i would suggest, and possibly even beneficial for reasons I had better not go into here...

    The quality of the aggregate would have to be analysed properly IMO.

    One of the benefits of the grade and relay operation, is that it IS repair and maintenance

    A proper camber is I believe, essential, and will take place before any other work would take place. The concept of incorporating cement into the top 15-300mm of the recambered road and then compacting it, seems to me to be rather clever.

    To "Fast driving and pooling water.... ... the biggest destroyer of aggregate surfaces", add modern huge farm kit and 4wd vehicles, especially when being driven fast...
    Last edited by steveR; 26-01-14 at 02:55 PM.
    steveR formerly known as dexterbeef!

  14. #44
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    Re: DIY Home brew Concrete

    The private roads here that require heavy traffic such as logging roads with 40-50 ton truck traffic are built up above the grade using the material dug from the ditches capped with a better gravel. If it crosses boggy low ground or peat ground geofabric is laid on the ground before building up the gravel. If you don't have the fabric its almost pointless as it will only last about 10 truck passes.

    We have used the fabric quite a bit and find it works fantastic. 1.2 km of concrete would be nuts here. Could probably pay for 50 km of gravel and fabric construction with same money. Concrete on crap subgrade without rebar often ends bad too. Provincial highway was done like that, they had to asphalt over the mess after only 15 years.

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