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Thread: 100 years since the invention of the header harvester

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    100 years since the invention of the header harvester

    the ABC's Landline program this week tells the story of Hedlie Taylor's invention of the header harvester. Until then, grain was harvested in Aus by stripper front machines, which could not handle crops which had lodged. Hedlie Taylor spent several years developing his header harvester, the first to use the knife system common on combines today which allowed farmers to save many crops.

    Taylor sold his patents to HVMacKay, which at one stage was manufacturing 1000 machines each year. Taylor worked for that company without a formal agreement from 1916 until 1953.

    More info: http://www.abc.net.au/landline/conte...3/s3945639.htm

    (I hope this Aus site works in the northern hemisphere; we cannot watch similar BBC sites for some weird reason which I forget).

    JV

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    Re: 100 years since the invention of the header harvester

    it does work

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    Re: 100 years since the invention of the header harvester

    Quote Originally Posted by davidroberts30 View Post
    it does work
    Thankyou. In the venacular: enjoy

    JV

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    Re: 100 years since the invention of the header harvester

    John
    I would not like to take anything away from Headley.
    Their is no doubt the Australian "combine" ( as we would call them) industry developed separately to the rest of the world
    But surely this is little different to the headers developed in California and Argentina several years earlier
    The double auger is of course different
    But table design was a development of the binder, using a sickle blade, fingers of various lengths and reel to pull the crop off the knife
    Also this design is similar to descriptions of Roman harvesters used in Italy 2000 years ago.
    unfortunately no pictures or remains exist today

    note changed millennia
    Last edited by Exfarmer; 17-02-14 at 09:34 PM.
    Ixworth Solar Farming Ltd.

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    Re: 100 years since the invention of the header harvester

    Ex.

    Some good points there. No question that binders used a reciprocating knife in fingers, and presumably before Headlie's 1914-16 work. The only way to know what he claimed as novel in his patent would be to read the patent - which might even be possible to do online. All I know is what was on the video, and that emphasised the Taylor machine's ability to pick lodged crops which had variable head heights, which the stripper machines were unable to do. Maybe someone with some time available could do some sleuthing.

    As for Argentinian technology, as I remember, the video said that HVMcKay exported a number to Argentina. Presumably either the technology was superior or the price was right - both

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    Re: 100 years since the invention of the header harvester

    All these early pioneers should be honoured for their work
    their is no doubt many of these people should be up with Marconi, Henry Ford and many many more
    Ixworth Solar Farming Ltd.

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    Re: 100 years since the invention of the header harvester

    Quote Originally Posted by Exfarmer View Post
    All these early pioneers should be honoured for their work
    their is no doubt many of these people should be up with Marconi, Henry Ford and many many more
    Correct. And not forgetting Harry Ferguson, without whose work I would not have some intresting conundrums to solve ;-)

    It would be nice if someone could steal some time to look on the IP Australia website, in the hope that the Taylor patents are online to be read. (Count me out).

    JV

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