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Thread: Vintage log processing

  1. #1
    Dave Applesquasher
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    Vintage log processing

    This is why I have been arseing about with a Lister elevator.
    I had a cunning plan and tonight it came together nicely
    You can't cut wood this quick with a chainsaw!!


  2. #2
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    Re: Vintage log processing

    Maybe not, but chainsaws don't come in 40hp versions ;-)

    Seriously, I have yet to figure out which is the cheapest in time & fuel. Only conclusion I can come to is horses for courses. Chainsaw for big logs, docking saw for branches. The logs in the video look to be light, so I guess the bench is best.

    JV

  3. #3
    Dave Applesquasher
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    Re: Vintage log processing

    Nah, I just make them look light.

    The wood is Leylandii and those particular bits are off the trunks of trees that drowned due to a blocked drain (which they probably blocked)
    They have been standing dead for years so are dry to somewhere around 17% already.
    The bigger uncut log on the floor will probably just about go through the bench but I thought it easier to chainsaw it rather than struggle because it is on the heavy side. I can lift it but would be pushing my luck with summat that heavy on the bench.

  4. #4
    Senior Member ladycrofter's Avatar
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    Re: Vintage log processing

    I thought you had a woman to cut and carry your firewood

  5. #5
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    Re: Vintage log processing

    Quote Originally Posted by ladycrofter View Post
    I thought you had a woman to cut and carry your firewood
    Anyone want a good order bale elevator?

  6. #6
    Dave Applesquasher
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    Re: Vintage log processing

    Quote Originally Posted by ladycrofter View Post
    I thought you had a woman to cut and carry your firewood
    I have to cut it but she will carry it.
    Not many farmers wives get told they can have the heating full on as much as they like

  7. #7
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    Re: Vintage log processing

    Is that a Fergie chord saw on an MF35?

  8. #8
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    Re: Vintage log processing

    Good job, I've got a similar set up but found I ended up replacing the slats over time with steel as the wood snapped when a big log went on........ But the elevator had previously been used for putting tires on top a covered silage pit so had got wet many a time so were probably but rotten. Makes easy work of firewood. I put my splitter at a 90 degree angle do if anything wants halving I just trust round and split then drop on elevator. Can't beat a good bit of firewood work...... Nice and toasty all winter!!!

    Excellent job and I hope it works for years to come as well as it has for me!

  9. #9
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    Re: Vintage log processing

    By the sound of it, that new saw blade was well worth the money.......singing!!!
    Split some fresh felled Leylandi a month or two ago......never seen water/sap weeping out of logs as much before as they went through the splitter and I mean you got wet hands holding them!
    gee

  10. #10
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    Re: Vintage log processing

    Leylandi is horrid stuff to handle when fresh, but I live burning the horrid stuff gives great satisfaction!

  11. #11
    Dave Applesquasher
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    Re: Vintage log processing

    Yes it is a Fergie saw on a 35, and that new blade is just awesome! Buzz straight through.
    TBH I was being a bit timid in the vid, didn't want to chop my hand off while on camera

    I have an unlimited supply of Leylandii and it is what I run my heating, hot water and cooking on. As firewood it is damned brilliant stuff, I think it is probably my favourite wood.
    Fresh felled the resin is quite horrid stuff but leave the cordwood outside for 2-3 years and it disappears completely. Then I cut and split it.
    The elevator has sat outside for 10 years and the wood is just fine. I did wonder if heavy logs would break it but I have sheeted under the lahs with galvanised steel, I think that takes the punishment rather than the laths.

  12. #12
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    Re: Vintage log processing

    Dave #11

    What a coincidence!

    I could not place the Leylandii, so looked it up on Wikipedia.

    Turns out it is a cross of Cupressus macrocarpa (Monterey Cypress, grown widely here, including as self-sown trees around my sheds) and Cupressus nootkatensis (Alaskan cypress). Now I understand why you said it is so light & why you mention the resin coz I've experienced both. I also understand why Gee came in on the conversation: various clones were developed at Haggerston Castle, Northumbria, and presumably the tree is very common there.

    JV

  13. #13
    Dave Applesquasher
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    Re: Vintage log processing

    They are very common all over the UK and hated by most folk.
    In the mid 70's they took off as the "new" hedging plant and many folk planted them in their gardens. They grow like bloody hell and in no time they become giant and unmanageable monsters (in a garden situation).
    we even have laws over here now against them, mostly because they block out so much light.

    They have bad press really because they do make excellent hedges if kept trimmed, but the minute you turn your back they will get away from you, growing over one metre per year.
    We have them al round our fields as windbreaks as a legacy of my grandfather planting thousands of them. Trouble is he insisted we didn't top them and now many of them are 100' tall, they keep whole fields in shade through the winter.
    Anywhere that I had a say in the matter were kept at hedgecutter height, which is fine.
    My endless supply of firewood comes from us "topping" them.

  14. #14
    Dave Applesquasher
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    Re: Vintage log processing

    Topping Leylands








  15. #15
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    Re: Vintage log processing

    The Leyland family that are responsible (not sure of the correct word to use there) still live and farm in the area.
    Leyland......Leylandi
    gee



    Quote Originally Posted by john maddock View Post
    Dave #11

    What a coincidence!

    I could not place the Leylandii, so looked it up on Wikipedia.

    Turns out it is a cross of Cupressus macrocarpa (Monterey Cypress, grown widely here, including as self-sown trees around my sheds) and Cupressus nootkatensis (Alaskan cypress). Now I understand why you said it is so light & why you mention the resin coz I've experienced both. I also understand why Gee came in on the conversation: various clones were developed at Haggerston Castle, Northumbria, and presumably the tree is very common there.

    JV
    Last edited by Gee; 23-03-13 at 05:40 PM.

  16. #16
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    Re: Vintage log processing

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leyland_Cypress

    Short extract: On receiving the inheritance Christopher changed his surname to Leyland, and moved to Haggerston Castle, Northumbria. He further developed the hybrid at his new home, and hence named the first clone variant 'Haggerston Grey'

    Much more there.

    JV

  17. #17
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    Re: Vintage log processing

    That conifer, or one very like it, can be grown from cuttings. I think the only conifer that can. And that's about all I remember from forestry lectures at college!

  18. #18
    Senior Member Mog's Avatar
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    Re: Vintage log processing

    Not sure if this will work but saw this one on Facebook today coincidentally


  19. #19
    Dave Applesquasher
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    Re: Vintage log processing

    All ours were grown by ourselves from cuttings, along with many thousands that we sold.
    Don't think it is the only conifer to grow from cuttings.

    Seen the Bobcat vid before, very good but you would need a lotto win to own one.

  20. #20
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    Re: Vintage log processing

    super machine that bobcat one

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