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Thread: welding question

  1. #1
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    welding question

    new to welding.

    when welding with 3.2s at 115 amps and it burns through the metal what is going wrong. are the rods too thick? amps too high. the next setting is 90 amps below (oxford oil welder)

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    Senior Member davidroberts30's Avatar
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    Re: welding question

    Quote Originally Posted by masseyman1 View Post
    new to welding.

    when welding with 3.2s at 115 amps and it burns through the metal what is going wrong. are the rods too thick? amps too high. the next setting is 90 amps below (oxford oil welder)
    amps to high
    travel speed to slow
    too much weld prep gap

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    Re: welding question

    should you be going the same speed with 2.5s as 3.2s aswell

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    Senior Member davidroberts30's Avatar
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    Re: welding question

    Quote Originally Posted by masseyman1 View Post
    should you be going the same speed with 2.5s as 3.2s aswell
    thats a how long is a piece of string question

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    Senior Member ACE's Avatar
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    Re: welding question

    a lot of the old oxford oil cooled stick welders and other makes have 2 voltage settings don't they? is it 50 volts and 80 volts? not sure if its the power lead you swap to a different terminal or the earth? with out looking at one anyway.

    50 volts is for normal rods etc and 80 volts is normally used for specials

    115amps is not over the top for 3.2 rods though so what thickness metal you welding up? the length of the welding arc will have a affect on it burning though the metal too.

    with a big gap between the rod and work piece there is a bigger arc that gets metal hotter I think.

    I can weld fairly well normally both mig and stick but I couldn't tell or teach you how I just do it, practice makes perfect and all that

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    Re: welding question

    probably not fierce thick 3mm box?
    another thing the metal would be red for a few seconds when finished. is that a sign that the arc is too far from the metal?

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    Re: welding question

    Quote Originally Posted by masseyman1 View Post
    new to welding.

    when welding with 3.2s at 115 amps and it burns through the metal what is going wrong. are the rods too thick? amps too high. the next setting is 90 amps below (oxford oil welder)
    what thickness of steel are you welding?

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    Re: welding question

    Have you tried it at the next setting down? Is the handle actually in correct position? Turn it flat out and is pointer on max amps or reading short or over?

    Are you butt welding box section end to end or end to edge type? If end to end it's very easy to blow through 3mm with arc welderand takes practice. If you're welding them 'T' style then try to concentrate the weld on the corner edge of the box not the cut piece as the corner will take the heat better. Hope that makes sence!!!
    Ond lle bu'r arad' ar y ffridd Yn rhywgo'r gwanwyn pr o'r pridd

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    Senior Member ACE's Avatar
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    Re: welding question

    Quote Originally Posted by masseyman1 View Post
    probably not fierce thick 3mm box?
    another thing the metal would be red for a few seconds when finished. is that a sign that the arc is too far from the metal?
    3mm thick box with 3.2mm rods no wonder! even with experience you will find that differcult!

    2.5mm rods will be much better for that sort of thickness, you don't have to use the same dia rods as the material you are welding! holy cow you would need a maga amount of amps to runs a 10mm rod for welding 10mm plate!

    With the right process you can weld your 3mm box just fine even with 1.6mm rods, but its not the done thing as its not cost effective as would require multiple passes, were as most joints in 3mm a 2.5mm rod would do fine in one pass unless you have a gap to fill in?

    if you have decent rods you can rest the rod on the work surface all the time no need to keep the rod held off the material. Depends on the rod type some are contact and some are not. most new standard rods are contact I think. was common place many many years ago not to have contact type?

    Not seen him on here for a good while but snowcat is the man that would know all about welding and tell you all the boring complicated technical bits! (I mean that in a nice way snowcat)

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    Senior Member T P's Avatar
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    Re: welding question

    I assume you are using good quality rods like 6013 from a reputable brand and not some of the Chinese rubbish that populates farm supply stores everywhere? if you are learning to weld start of with some of the top brand names for rods like esab, oerlinkon etc. I bought a box of unheard of brandname crap to make some gates up for a new cattle crush a couple of years back when I happened to be in a tractor parts place and they were a disaster. After a few minutes I had to drive to the nearest reputable supplier and get some decent ones,still the cheap ones are handy for stirring paint. At least I twigged on it was the rods and not me but if you were trying to learn with them it would have taken an awful long time............. There are lots of good videos on youtube of how to weld and this is a very good website too:

    http://www.weldingtipsandtricks.com/...ng-videos.html

    Plenty of welding forums to browse too:

    http://www.mig-welding.co.uk/forum/t...ss-size.29723/

    An entertainer:

    http://www.weldingtipsandtricks.com/...nd-beatin.html

    he does a real job here, seems a very down to earth chap.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Dc0...j4-UApS_m_6mPw

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    Re: welding question

    another question---
    I want to weld a gate bracket onto a h iron. now the gate bracket is bought galvanised. is the best thing to sand back the galvanise and weld it and just paint the weld?

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    Re: welding question

    Quote Originally Posted by masseyman1 View Post
    another question---
    I want to weld a gate bracket onto a h iron. now the gate bracket is bought galvanised. is the best thing to sand back the galvanise and weld it and just paint the weld?
    I know nothing about welding,but welding galvanised causes toxic fumes to be given off.Grind off before welding and repaint.

  13. #13

    Re: welding question

    Quote Originally Posted by masseyman1 View Post
    another question---
    I want to weld a gate bracket onto a h iron. now the gate bracket is bought galvanised. is the best thing to sand back the galvanise and weld it and just paint the weld?
    Grind the galvanize off (wearing the correct PPE unless you have the wish to have 24hr flu) then weld it (again protecting your lungs) then spray some cold galvanize spray on the repair, failing that paint it.

    This is worth a gander also although the guy doing the demos seams a bit of a chancer

  14. #14
    Senior Member grassmanman's Avatar
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    Re: welding question

    Quote Originally Posted by masseyman1 View Post
    another question---
    I want to weld a gate bracket onto a h iron. now the gate bracket is bought galvanised. is the best thing to sand back the galvanise and weld it and just paint the weld?
    Drill the h iron and bolt it on esp if ur welding skills aren't great. Otherwise grind off a bit of the galvanizing and turn welder up rightly. Don't get too worried about PPE a bit of welding galvanised stuff won't do you much harm. Well at least I hope not the amount I've welded up over the years!!

  15. #15

    Re: welding question

    Quote Originally Posted by grassmanman View Post
    . Otherwise grind off a bit of the galvanizing and turn welder up rightly. Don't get too worried about PPE a bit of welding galvanised stuff won't do you much harm. Well at least I hope not the amount I've welded up over the years!!
    Thats madness, ip rated masks are about 20 a box, Masks are made for those "doing a bit of welding" anyone else should have some sort of extraction and or a proper air fed mask. ALL welding fumes are bad for you, they cause cancer, pneumonia, ocupational asthma and kill people every year young and old. Not protecting yourself is just f'in stupid.

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    Re: welding question

    Quote Originally Posted by grassmanman View Post
    Drill the h iron and bolt it on esp if ur welding skills aren't great. Otherwise grind off a bit of the galvanizing and turn welder up rightly. Don't get too worried about PPE a bit of welding galvanised stuff won't do you much harm. Well at least I hope not the amount I've welded up over the years!!
    NO NO NO do not attempt to grind current weld galvanise without protection, it wrecks lungs.
    Ixworth Solar Farming Ltd.

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    Re: welding question

    welding galvanised will do you no more long term harm than any other welding fumes ,short term the effects are not very pleasant with the 24 hour flu effect but then you should protect against all welding fumes

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    Re: welding question

    Quote Originally Posted by grassmanman View Post
    Don't get too worried about PPE a bit of welding galvanised stuff won't do you much harm. Well at least I hope not the amount I've welded up over the years!!
    That's what they thought about asbestos, once upon a time............

  19. #19
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    Re: welding question

    Either bolt it on or pop back down the co-op and buy two bare steel ones to weld on and save yourself the hassle, grief and most important ill-health of bothering with galvenicing!!!
    Ond lle bu'r arad' ar y ffridd Yn rhywgo'r gwanwyn pr o'r pridd

  20. #20
    Senior Member v12cat's Avatar
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    Re: welding question

    Quote Originally Posted by defender View Post
    welding galvanised will do you no more long term harm than any other welding fumes ,short term the effects are not very pleasant with the 24 hour flu effect but then you should protect against all welding fumes
    Many years ago I poisoned myself badly welding galv. The effects, after a few hours, were so severe I physically couldn't use a phone of any sort to call for help, and couldn't even hold a cup or glass to get a drink. Severe (and I mean VERY severe) shaking. Very scary. Luckily I slept it off and had no (AFAIK) lasting effects. Not something I would want to repeat.

  21. #21

    Re: welding question

    Quote Originally Posted by defender View Post
    welding galvanized will do you no more long term harm than any other welding fumes ,short term the effects are not very pleasant with the 24 hour flu effect but then you should protect against all welding fumes
    Correct although unpleasant and not the brightest thing to do the low term effects of Zinc poisoning are only short lived, however welding fumes do have long term effects and generaly the more exposure you have the more liklely you are to develop a problem and/or in the case of Occupational Asthma become compleatly intolerant to and kind of dust, or smoke and unable to carry out any Hot works.

    Stainless is especially Nasty as it has diffrent degrees of Chromium and depending on the process it will contain more or less % of hexavalent Chromium which is what you really don't want in you lungs.

    Hard face wires have Chromium in them by the bucket load, These shouldn't be used without a proper air fed bucket, they have direct links to cancer. Masks cannot provide the level of protection needed from the concentrations found when burning volumes of this wire.

    Like smoking not everyone is susceptible to the problems, Some can work in crappy conditions and still live to be 100, some develop Cancer at 30 and drop down dead at 32, PPEs always cheaper to buy than a set of lungs.

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