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Thread: Switzerland and Germany bTB situation

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    Question Switzerland and Germany bTB situation

    This is a question for Matthew really.
    Do you know if they have spoligotyped the bTB in Switzerland and Germany?
    I'd be very interested to know.

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    Senior Member matthew's Avatar
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    Re: Switzerland and Germany bTB situation

    Quote Originally Posted by Balwenlady View Post
    This is a question for Matthew really.
    Do you know if they have spoligotyped the bTB in Switzerland and Germany?
    I'd be very interested to know.
    I'll find out.
    This is the posting which may have provoked the question.

    http://bovinetb.blogspot.co.uk/2013/...itzerland.html

    Our German correspondent and a Swiss vet, are also at pains to point out the 'TB free' allows for a very small amount of cases per year. OIE definition of 'TB free' is that with regular testing, over 3 years or more, 99.8 and 99.9 per cent of cattle and herds of cattle have tested clear. Then a country can apply to go onto abattoir surveillance, which is what parts of Switzerland and Germany have done.
    These outbreaks, originally found at abattoir inspections, appear to show a bigger problem. And it seems to be associated with increasing levels of infection in the badgers and deer which inhabit the slopes of the Bavarian Alps.
    Question is, what are those countries going to do about it?

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    Re: Switzerland and Germany bTB situation

    Thanks, Matthew.
    Yes, it was that article which made me ask.
    Do keep us posted.

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    Senior Member matthew's Avatar
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    Re: Switzerland and Germany bTB situation

    No sooner said

    We hear that deer culling is to be increased by up to 40 per cent in parts of the region affected.
    And this article has some useful quotes re wildlife reservoirs in other countries, as well as detection methods (PCR) and spoligotypes:

    http://www.hindawi.com/isrn/vs/2012/245138/

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    Re: Switzerland and Germany bTB situation

    Thank you. Will read and digest with great interest.

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    Senior Member matthew's Avatar
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    Re: Switzerland and Germany bTB situation

    Quote Originally Posted by Balwenlady View Post
    Thank you. Will read and digest with great interest.
    Will have to update the thread - I did check if I read the info coming in correctly, and this may relevance to a posting on the original bTB thread. Our Bavarian colleague confirms that in Austria / Germany who is sending the info (will check the exact area) no milk sales are permitted while the herd is under TB restriction That's not just reactor cattle, which came in here in 2006, but from all cattle in the herd. The milk may sold, after dedicated collection, at 20 % of 'normal' price, for pasteurisation and making into milk powder.

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    Re: Switzerland and Germany bTB situation

    Who stands the loss on that then? the farmer of the govt?

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    Re: Switzerland and Germany bTB situation

    Quote Originally Posted by matbrojoe View Post
    Who stands the loss on that then? the farmer of the govt?
    I'd better enquire But with BSE, it was made impossible to report, and the farmer stood the losses.

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    Re: Switzerland and Germany bTB situation

    "Management of wildlife disease can be classified into four basic categories: prevention, control, eradication, and doing nothing (laissez faire) [25, 37]. The issue of TB in wildlife cuts across a variety of stakeholder interests. Within an atmosphere of conflict and uncertainty, wildlife disease reservoirs for M. caprae often pose a “wicked problem” [37]. This obstacle will be experienced by all stakeholders, when trying to implement control strategies."

    I am going to follow their decision on how to handle this with great interest.

    "Reviewing M. bovis transmission from and to wild animals, Corner summarizes the transmission process between deer to cattle as unclear: although he estimates the risk of aerosol transmission to cattle to be more pervasive than the risk of infection by ingestion, aerosol transmission would require close interaction of cattle and deer in both time and space, and moreover cattle are relatively insensitive to oral challenge [23]."

    Am I write in thinking that they are saying that cattle are more likely to become infected by ingesting (eating) bacteria than by breathing them in? Thus implying shared pasture to be more of a problem that nose to nose contact with wildlife?

    I must confess that I hadn't heard of M.caprae before. But then I read that it was only given a separate classification in the last decade. Do we distinguish between the two when testing wildlife in this country?

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    Senior Member matthew's Avatar
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    Re: Switzerland and Germany bTB situation

    A bit more info just arrived from snowy Bavaria. I love the internet

    Not only sales of milk banned (except for powder) but meat too.

    The farmer is compensated for any cattle slaughtered; this money comes from compulsory insurance + government contribution. For the production losses, private insurance is needed.

    And that is where we have a huge problem. Many of us had TB insurance, and some, including us, had 'consequential loss' insurance as well. But that was along time ago and we are now uninsurable. Underwriters will not offer cover to any herd which has made a claim, premiums have quadrupled and pay outs halved. Several years ago Defra tried to get a joint scheme underwritten, as described above, and were laughed out of court. The TB part of farm insurance, is haemorrhaging profit, and up with that, they will not put.
    "Exposure to risk is too high " ... and they weren't talking about cattle.


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