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Thread: Learning curve.

  1. #1
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    Learning curve.

    Back just before harvest we aquired a new (to us) subsoiler having tried several demos in 2013 we weren't convinced 100% if it was what we needed and the price tag made it an expensive mistake if it didn't fit in so having at the time spotted this Quivogne Pluton laying forlorn at a dealers yard surprisingly way down in the west country our man was pleasantly surprised to see it still there many months later!










    These are the images supplied and after a bit of digital zooming it looked reasonable enough although there were a few issues but the price ended up reasonable enough and it looked like we may have problems with the packer bearings having been out in the elements for some time although we were assured by the importers that the disc bearings were pretty near bomb proof although it had some flat spots on many discs where pebble-stones had jammed between the disc and its arm.

    For some reason there seemed to of been an issue with keeping the legs tight/in their place as we could see stop blocks welded either side of the legs brackets and also there was quite some wear in the linkage pins. On the plus side it came with a new set of plain legs, these apparently are made by Tim Howard for Quivogne and follow Tims theory used on the Maxilift we also run, wings and leg are pretty thin from new as the theory is that too thick makes the edge engaging the soil "blunt" and makes for hard pulling. More on that later.....

  2. #2
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    Re: Learning curve.

    Heres the headstock off and the worn pin bosses being repaired




    It looked like the pins hadn't been inserted fully which allowed things to wear badly. Not very clever at all.










    Here are the bosses being aligned up with new pins, you can see in the images below how I trimmed the old ones out with the gas, if your careful you can cut it right up to where the boss ends without too much damage to the plate, the trick is to use the edge of the flame and catch the wafer thin remains of the boss with the flame and watch it glow rapidly while the plate below heats up a lot slower and fails to burn








    Bosses trimmed out ready for tidying up, did this with a carbide burr. The bosses were a bit of solid bar that I cleaned up in the lathe and bored out in readyness.
    Cheated a bit by using the new pins to align things up.

  3. #3
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    Re: Learning curve.

    Those multi size pins always were a bad design just waiting for the untrained or lazy driver not to insert them fully
    Ixworth Solar Farming Ltd.

  4. #4
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    Re: Learning curve.

    Pete,

    when you get the new subby hooked up to a tractor, it may pay to have some shims made up for the top link brackets, and maybe the link arms, we now have on the sumo, cracked the top link pin at the tractor end, apparently there was mm of movement, enough to o re stress the pin and away it went,
    luckily it fractured and didn't rip out,

    EDIT, as I recall the pins on the sumo actually have locator lugs so they can't turn in work, good idea just remind yourself they are there else other wise you pinch a finger
    Big Vern..... Stay low Move faster

  5. #5
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    Re: Learning curve.

    Heres what I thought might happen given the time that the machine had stood. The packer roller bearings seemed to have zero lift but after a good days work the inevitable happened. Dropping the roller off isn't difficult and we stripped it right back, only one bearing had collapsed, it was evident that these were the original bearings and also that for some reason the grease ring in the housing doesn't align up with its mate around the outer of the bearing insert!! No wonder it had collapsed- trying to grease the housings just forced grease out between the housing and the bearing.





    Before reassembling i took the opportunity to lubricate the old housings using a tapered lubing nozzle although care was needed to stop the internal pressure from blowing the bearings seals out!








    Once the bearings were sorted it was a matter of rebuilding it back together again. If we keep this machine long term then I can see it being a good idea to replace the bearings with a better style, preferably capable of being lubricated easily without too much palaver.

    In some of the images earlier there were some of the wear steel added to some of the legs supplied when we bought it. We have played around a bit trying to find the best mix of steel legs with ceramic tiles added. The legs as supplied fitted to the machine had been reclaimed with tile lumps up the shins and on the wings. We found that the flints found in some of the farm chipped the wing tiles badly where as the shin lumps were exactly that- too much and too wide, instead of Tim Howards philosophy of keeping it thin/narrow to keep the draught low it was using such wide tiles on the shin that it could be a reason as to why there was harder shear bolts fitted compared to normal- in work the legs were popping shear bolts off easily because in effect it was pulling 1" wide legs!

    We are now trialing the use of a ceramic points with plain wings (cutting new wings from Hardox plate) together with ceramic shins although a more modest width so that it is similar the leg width and reduces the draught needed to pull it

  6. #6
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    Re: Learning curve.

    Still using the Pluton, I think its done more than the Tim Howard Maxilift especially since we ditched the part worn discs, the new ones making a much better job even though there was still a fair bit of meat on them they didn't have the right angle or bite.

    This week it was noticed that one of the disc bearings had become a bit tight, a sealed unit and allegedly super reliable we took the arm off and stripped down the hub, I could see soil had worn away most of the rubber lip on the inverted oilseal and the soil had also started to wear away the bearings own outer seal enough to just see some of the balls, looking as more of the bearing became exposed it had a familiar look, - double row ball bearing thrust races in a single housing so first stop was the two online bearing companies who listed it but it was google that spilled the beans with a reference to it being a common front wheel bearing or to be exact, off a Ford Cougar or early Mondeo's

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