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Thread: 'Classic' wheat varieties

  1. #1
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    'Classic' wheat varieties

    I need help from some of you older hands here as my memory simply doesn't exist that far back, bearing in mind I only got involved in the industry proper in about 96.

    As some of you may know, I am getting married in February, and I'm drawing up a table plan right now and a fair few guests are connected to agriculture in some way, particularly arable farming so I'm going to put my slant on it with table names borrowed from classic wheat varieties. My question is this, which have been the memorable ones over the last 30 years or so?

    So, so far in mind I have this sort of thing:

    Haven
    Malacca
    Claire
    Deben

    Many thanks for your help in advance. If you happen to know something of their characteristics (don't use that it was a disease ridden shambles!) or have some useful agronomic anecdote, please include it as a nice thread for a trip down memory lane.

    New years wishes

    Ollie

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    Re: 'Classic' wheat varieties

    Here are some golden oldies from my youth.

    Capelle-Desprez used to be very popular.

    Maris Widgeon A bread maker

    Maris Huntsman a popular feed wheat

    Champlein a bread wheat

    Brigand, Norman,Avalon,Bounty, Hobbit are some more. Let me know if you haven't got enough.

    Have a good wedding.

  3. #3
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    Re: 'Classic' wheat varieties

    riband

  4. #4
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    Re: 'Classic' wheat varieties

    Quote Originally Posted by Uwork4menow View Post
    I need help from some of you older hands here as my memory simply doesn't exist that far back, bearing in mind I only got involved in the industry proper in about 96.

    As some of you may know, I am getting married in February, and I'm drawing up a table plan right now and a fair few guests are connected to agriculture in some way, particularly arable farming so I'm going to put my slant on it with table names borrowed from classic wheat varieties. My question is this, which have been the memorable ones over the last 30 years or so?

    So, so far in mind I have this sort of thing:

    Haven
    Malacca
    Claire
    Deben

    Many thanks for your help in advance. If you happen to know something of their characteristics (don't use that it was a disease ridden shambles!) or have some useful agronomic anecdote, please include it as a nice thread for a trip down memory lane.

    New years wishes

    Ollie
    Jeez
    Something you don't know!!!
    Hope the prospective has taken note of your online Nom du Plume
    ;-))))

  5. #5
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    Re: 'Classic' wheat varieties

    Aquila, norman , galahad, slepner, soissons, paragon, stetson

  6. #6
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    Re: 'Classic' wheat varieties

    I think there was one called istabraq don't know how old it is Ollie,

    Good luck to you and future mrs Ollie,,, (is it going to be a grand do???)
    Big Vern..... Stay low Move faster

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    Re: 'Classic' wheat varieties

    1950's - Little Joss, first resistance to rust. Yeoman and Holdfast - good for strong flour.
    Holdfast, short strawed. Squarehead's Master, long strawed and low yielding. Rampton Rivet, bearded, red grained and later than most.

  8. #8
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    Re: 'Classic' wheat varieties

    Hereward

  9. #9
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    Re: 'Classic' wheat varieties

    Ok thanks so far.

    Riband
    Malacca
    Soissions
    Slepjner
    Maris Huntsman
    Napier
    Claire
    Haven
    Holdfast

    It's either that or I come up with the latin names for 14 different crops which is not going to be straightforward.

    Hi Vern

    Yes it is going to be something of a grand do, followed by a swift (hopefully) plane to Thailand which is going to be an experience as Asia is one continent I have never been to at all.

    I just have to survive a helicopter flight and unlimited mulled wine first.

  10. #10
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    Re: 'Classic' wheat varieties

    Quote Originally Posted by Uwork4menow View Post
    Ok thanks so far.

    Riband
    Malacca
    Soissions
    Slepjner
    Maris Huntsman
    Napier
    Claire
    Haven
    Holdfast

    It's either that or I come up with the latin names for 14 different crops which is not going to be straightforward.

    Hi Vern

    Yes it is going to be something of a grand do, followed by a swift (hopefully) plane to Thailand which is going to be an experience as Asia is one continent I have never been to at all.

    I just have to survive a helicopter flight and unlimited mulled wine first.

    you should know Latin plant names...,,,,, at least your going to Thailand with a wife and not coming home with one,,,,
    Big Vern..... Stay low Move faster

  11. #11
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    Re: 'Classic' wheat varieties

    I hope he comes home with one otherwise he will have lost her.

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    Re: 'Classic' wheat varieties

    One for the timing as well: Flanders

    So how will you lay out the tables/ church? Wheat on one side chaff on the other ?

    Good luck
    Last edited by essexpete; 06-01-15 at 07:19 PM.

  13. #13
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    Re: 'Classic' wheat varieties

    Copain, Virtue, Guardian.

    You could even make it all into a speech

    'I hope we share a happy Haven, I shall be a Guardian of her Virtue but I hope she has decent love handles so I can Holdfast.....'

  14. #14
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    Re: 'Classic' wheat varieties

    Ollie,
    pyou could sit all the bad boys on the Oakley table,,,, after its performance a few years back,,,
    Big Vern..... Stay low Move faster

  15. #15
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    Re: 'Classic' wheat varieties

    Consort,
    Just looking through old records, so from 1964 there was a cappelle winter wheat, spring wheat Opal, Vada spring barley, Proctor spring barley.
    Now varieties I knew Aardvark was a winter wheat, Raleigh another.
    For the record we still grow wall to wall Claire as we can consistently get towars the 4 tonne mark if nor more and we have a great arrangement with a local mill.

  16. #16
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    Re: 'Classic' wheat varieties

    Maris Templar (sister to Huntsman, there were 2 more if I can think of them)
    Joss Cambier
    Maris Widgeon
    Ixworth Solar Farming Ltd.

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    Re: 'Classic' wheat varieties

    Quote Originally Posted by Uwork4menow View Post
    Ok thanks so far.

    Riband
    Malacca
    Soissions
    Slepjner
    Maris Huntsman
    Napier
    Claire
    Haven
    Holdfast

    It's either that or I come up with the latin names for 14 different crops which is not going to be straightforward.

    Hi Vern

    Yes it is going to be something of a grand do, followed by a swift (hopefully) plane to Thailand which is going to be an experience as Asia is one continent I have never been to at all.

    I just have to survive a helicopter flight and unlimited mulled wine first.

    Brigadier was pretty ground braking as was Hobbit, Einstein. Agree on Flanders. Also Galahad and Norman.

    For the record correct spelling for the following Slejpner and Soissons


    Barry

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