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Thread: Cable to support a remote infrared camera

  1. #1
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    Cable to support a remote infrared camera

    Looking at calving camera......not able to get line of sight. ....or exploit earth cable.
    Chance might be coming up to hard wire it.
    Could some one point me to the type of cable I should use. Approaching 200 / 250 mtrs
    gee

  2. #2
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    Re: Cable to support a remote infrared camera

    Our outdoor cameras are connected with Cat5e, it's ducted underground but exposed above ground with no ill effects after a couple of years. Longest run is about 110m underground.

    Edit:

    If you are going underground though it may be worth sticking fibre in, it'd more than cope with any future upgrade then and wouldn't run any risk of conducting any stray electricity between the two buildings. No idea of cost or how to do it though as I haven't looked at it for our own place yet.
    Stay in Northamptonshire - meadowviewcottages.co.uk

  3. #3
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    Re: Cable to support a remote infrared camera

    Can't tell you which cable to use, but if you are looking at running it under ground with some electrical cable, on this side of the pond they have to be separated by several feet of dirt

  4. #4
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    Re: Cable to support a remote infrared camera

    Quote Originally Posted by Gee View Post
    Looking at calving camera......not able to get line of sight. ....or exploit earth cable.
    Chance might be coming up to hard wire it.
    Could some one point me to the type of cable I should use. Approaching 200 / 250 mtrs
    gee
    Cat 5 is what you need,got ours from www.cablemonkey.co.uk/
    However I think 100m is the max recomended length. Longer than that fibre is the answer but havn`t had anything to do with it

  5. #5
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    Re: Cable to support a remote infrared camera

    100 Meters is the limit for CAT5 or CAT6 or similar copper cabling in a single run but if there was somewhere in between the two ends (although on a 200m - 250m run two middle points would work better) you could make the run in two or three smaller runs, but the point(s) in the middle will need to have power to run a network switch to link the network cables together.

    To go further in a single run you will need to switch to Fibre, not too much of a problem just needs to be run and terminated correctly at the ends, will also mean a couple of extra bits of network hardware to link it all together, this is probably the most expensive solution.

    Whilst you say there isn't line of sight is there another building in between that can see both "ends" as bouncing a wireless signal via a middle point may be easier, again will only work if there is power in the building. Alternatively (and not knowing the topology and layout of the location) would it be possible to put one or other ariel up on a mast on the roof of the building to create line of sight or nearly line of site ?

  6. #6
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    Re: Cable to support a remote infrared camera

    When 'line of sight' is mentioned, does this mean literally?For example would trees be a problem?

  7. #7
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    Re: Cable to support a remote infrared camera

    When it comes to "line of sight" trees can be a problem, the more of them of the worse it could be, but there is no way of knowing for sure until a test link is put in a see how well it works. Some equipment may work better than others, and sometimes putting higher power ariels in can allow you to "power through" the trees.

    I put in a 300m wireless link between two parts of a school which had a large mature oak in the way, whilst the link worked ok in the spring / summer, it worked even better in winter when the tree was bare, it was around 25% faster and did not drop and re-establish so much.

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