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Thread: How it was...

  1. #1
    Senior Member Footsfitter's Avatar
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    How it was...

    Looking everywhere for some special terminal crimping pliers that I put in a safe place last year so the van, stores and office all got a looking over, even went through the deep drawer on my desk thats become the IT dump for anything to do with computers. Found a few old classic bits and pieces and plenty of old cd's, dvd's, 3-1/4" floppy discs and several of these snazzy items of technology!!





    Used to run a simple stock control for the workshop stores, at one time in the late 80's when we had the lettuce, spuds, lorries, drainage company, farm in portugal we held approx 24k worth of spares. I think we ran the program on the Amstrad PCW "computer" with the green screen, then came the real deal- the Amstrad 1512!!

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    Re: How it was...

    The screen on an Amstrad 1512 had to be seen to believe how bad it was. The dot matrix printer might have only been 60 but it was worth that when you compared it to the admittedly much superior Epson ones which were 4 times the price.

    Then came the Amstrad 1640 with EGA and you could actually see things on it. There was also a small portable as they were called in those days and this was not too bad at all. Alan Michael Sugar certainly shook the pc World up a bit when the 2086 was introduced. It looked solid like a "real" pc and the 286 chip was very quick compared to what was available before.

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    Senior Member WoodenHead's Avatar
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    Re: How it was...

    We started with a ACT Sirius (black screen, green characters?), then Apricot using TABS software. 'Floppies' locked up in a plastic case! Back-ups were 3 x sets of say 12 x 5.1/4 discs. Payroll became a dream! Dot matrix produced invoices instead of typed showed you were up there in the IT world.

    Caught my father one night bending down in front of the dedicated 'computer' desk with his finger holding open the floppy slot, squinting in, presumably to see who was living inside and how often they needed feeding......

    We then bought a new 'golf-ball' typewriter as our secretary refused to have anything to do with 'word-processing'

    WH
    Money isn't everything - but it sure helps to keep the children in touch

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    Senior Member Footsfitter's Avatar
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    Re: How it was...

    Quote Originally Posted by zaza View Post
    The screen on an Amstrad 1512 had to be seen to believe how bad it was. The dot matrix printer might have only been 60 but it was worth that when you compared it to the admittedly much superior Epson ones which were 4 times the price.

    Then came the Amstrad 1640 with EGA and you could actually see things on it. There was also a small portable as they were called in those days and this was not too bad at all. Alan Michael Sugar certainly shook the pc World up a bit when the 2086 was introduced. It looked solid like a "real" pc and the 286 chip was very quick compared to what was available before.
    Had a very second hand 1640 HD ! you had to type something in Dos to park the hard drive reading head before shutting it down if you were intending to move it!

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    Re: How it was...

    Quote Originally Posted by Footsfitter View Post
    Had a very second hand 1640 HD ! you had to type something in Dos to park the hard drive reading head before shutting it down if you were intending to move it!
    Yes, I can't remember if the word was park or parker. Could have been park on an Amstrad and parker on an Apricot. I was using both.

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