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Thread: direct drilling photo gallery?

  1. #1
    alwaysraining
    Guest

    direct drilling photo gallery?

    Would it be good to have a direct drilling photo gallery thread?

    I really find it interesting to see field photos during year.

    Would like to see how sumo/moore versadrill crops getting on. Sumo web site photos are great. Would like to see some spring photos.

  2. #2
    Jim_Bullock
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Good idea alwaysraining...
    and here is my first contribution, Solstice direct drilled into oilseed rape residue. The residue was harrowed twice, and the volunteers were sprayed off with 700 grams of Glyphosate the day before drilling (October 10th), slug pellets were applied the day after drilling and the only input since then has been 40kgs/ha of N applied last week...

  3. #3
    alwaysraining
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Einstein Second wheat
    Sewage cake applied and raked
    Drilled with Claydon Vdrill, drilled mid late October
    Rolled and raked after drilling
    Straw baled

    pre em spray

    Photos taken January 20th

  4. #4
    Tesla
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Does the cake not have to be incorporated slightly more than just raking?

  5. #5
    alwaysraining
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Raking kept them happy then v drilled soon after.

    pob would have been ok if we were close behind with drill but did not work out like that.

  6. #6
    sumo1
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    will post a couple tomorrow, had a very trying day/weekend drilling beans on very heavy land latterly with un-dressed beans:cry:

  7. #7
    Burkie50
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    This is an absolutely brilliant suggestion. From my own experience, seeing crop residue on top of the soil with new plants emerging, takes a little getting used to. I like the way you posters have shared your information, as to time, date, soil type, crop residue, crop planted into _______, seed variety, with pre- and post-emergence fert applications or sprays.

    This will be a thread that gets a lot of watching, myself included.

    Keep on Keepin' On!

    Burkie

  8. #8
    tree mover
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Great thread. The more the better. Fair play to the first in!

  9. #9
    sumo1
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    here's the weekends tribulations, struggled big style with uncleaned seed, lots of bits that resembled broken lollipop sticks:cry:

    spring beans variety unknown

    211 kg/ha

    24 ltr/ha

    very heavy wet land.

  10. #10
    Tesla
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Looks to be doing a tidy job. Agree that uncleaned bean seed is a disaster, and am sick of riding on the back of drills pulling pods out - and ours was cleaned! Cowboys.

  11. #11
    Top Cat
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    One advantage of the sulky (probably the only one) is it spits seeds out the metering system if the pipe chokes - put a camera on there and you can see blocks quickly.

  12. #12
    Tesla
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    With the simba drill metering units, you can see the seed falling out if one blocks, so you just need to keep your eyes open. Still a pain.

  13. #13
    sumo1
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    grass today

    25kg/ha

    very heavy land, dry on top, plasticine underneath.

  14. #14
    jonnieboy
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Quote Originally Posted by sumo1 View Post
    grass today

    25kg/ha

    very heavy land, dry on top, plasticine underneath.
    good to see rain didnt stop you, it sounded awful from inside your new shed

    cheers for the look round today boss seemed quite impressed with the drill

    and me well i NEED a laser cutter now

  15. #15
    sumo1
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Quote Originally Posted by jonnieboy View Post
    good to see rain didnt stop you, it sounded awful from inside your new shed

    cheers for the look round today boss seemed quite impressed with the drill

    and me well i NEED a laser cutter now
    Jon,
    thankyou for visiting, pleased you enjoyed it,
    cheers,
    Shaun.

  16. #16
    Andrew Kerr
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Shaun,

    Good to see you all last week,was also impressed with the new shed!

    Did you drop the front tines in on the grass much,we always used to like a tight seedbed for grass seed?

    I thought the drill had done a good job last autumn despite the fields being so wet and not being raked.

    Tine drills help a bit with the raking,sometimes too well!

    Andrew.

  17. #17
    giubraz1
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    This pic was taken at Fazenda Albatroz ( Albatroz Farm)in Campo Mourao township, Parana state in Brazil, I am not quite sure which year, but I think it was October 2005. The planter is sowing soybean summer crop after corn as a winter crop, 3 days after its harvest.

    Cheers Mate

  18. #18
    Greg
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    giubraz1. You've got me stuffed. I thought soy-beans(which i know nothing about)and corn were sown in spring.
    Regards,
    Greg.

  19. #19
    sumo1
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    done another 6.5 ha grass this morning

  20. #20
    TasCowboy
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg View Post
    giubraz1. You've got me stuffed. I thought soy-beans(which i know nothing about)and corn were sown in spring.
    Regards,
    Greg.
    Their climate is probably a bit different to ours Greg, I would guess their winters are a bit milder than what we are used to in these parts

  21. #21
    giubraz1
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Quote Originally Posted by TasCowboy View Post
    Their climate is probably a bit different to ours Greg, I would guess their winters are a bit milder than what we are used to in these parts
    Right, let me explain: Soybean is always sown on spring( September to mid-December).

    However in some parts of the southern states and mid-west states of Brazil,southern east of Paraguay and few parts of northern east of Argentina, Corn can also be growth during Outumn/winter,( besides Spring) depending on the microclimate of the region which is followed by the altitude, which varies from 300Mt to 1200 MT above sea level plus Clouds currents.

    Yes, and in these regions the winter is also milder, it may get 1 or 3 degrees or eventually frosts with cold nights with warmer days).


    Cheers Mate

  22. #22
    CNS
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Just looking at Shaun's pictures and can see he's going at an angle but when direct drilling do you rip the old tramlines up first with shakerator or subsoiler?

    Question I'm asking is: what do you do about all the ruts e.t.c. from the last crop

  23. #23
    sumo1
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Quote Originally Posted by CNS View Post
    Just looking at Shaun's pictures and can see he's going at an angle but when direct drilling do you rip the old tramlines up first with shakerator or subsoiler?

    Question I'm asking is: what do you do about all the ruts e.t.c. from the last crop
    Obviously we're on a steep learning curve re direct drilling and up to now we try wherever possible to drill at a slight angle to previous drilling.

    To date we have not loosened any tramlines, nor felt the need with having the loosening legs on the drill.

    I have some pictures at work taken today of second wheat growing in last years tramlines, I'll post them tomorrow.

    cheers,
    Shaun.

  24. #24
    CNS
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Thanks for that Shaun,
    You wouldn't be able to cross some of our tramlines in places, so was wondering how you did it,

    Cheers

  25. #25
    WillScale
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Quote Originally Posted by CNS View Post
    Just looking at Shaun's pictures and can see he's going at an angle but when direct drilling do you rip the old tramlines up first with shakerator or subsoiler?

    Question I'm asking is: what do you do about all the ruts e.t.c. from the last crop
    The less you till the less bad the ruts should be - over time.

    Two schools of thought on tramlines. Some say use different ones each year, keep something growing in them always to prevent the soil getting worse - I guess its logical really soil can't look after itself if theres nothing growing in it!

    The other side of it is CTF. No planting at 25 degrees. Same tramlines each year.

    Both methods have pros and cons I guess. Personally with gps almost universal I think I'd like to have something growing in the tramlines nowadays - even if it is short slightly green corn!

    p.s. i know elmsted loves the 25 degrees to the previous crop thing and I do it most of the time and can see its merits but the best stands of some of my crops this year have been parallel with the previous crop. Or maybe because the spring is so slow the establishment is still more obscured.

  26. #26
    sumo1
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Quote Originally Posted by CNS View Post
    Thanks for that Shaun,
    You wouldn't be able to cross some of our tramlines in places, so was wondering how you did it,

    Cheers
    I think I would draw a line if the tramlines were deeper than 5-6 inches, any less would drill ok, anymore would need loosening/levelling.

    We are definately finding that tramlines are far deeper on ex ploughed crops than min-tilled.

  27. #27
    alwaysraining
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Shaun- top notch photos, looking forward to see how crops getting on now.

  28. #28
    Carpathian Cropper
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Quote Originally Posted by sumo1 View Post
    Obviously we're on a steep learning curve re direct drilling and up to now we try wherever possible to drill at a slight angle to previous drilling.

    To date we have not loosened any tramlines, nor felt the need with having the loosening legs on the drill.

    I have some pictures at work taken today of second wheat growing in last years tramlines, I'll post them tomorrow.

    cheers,
    Shaun.
    Quote Originally Posted by WillScale View Post
    The less you till the less bad the ruts should be - over time.

    Two schools of thought on tramlines. Some say use different ones each year, keep something growing in them always to prevent the soil getting worse - I guess its logical really soil can't look after itself if theres nothing growing in it!

    The other side of it is CTF. No planting at 25 degrees. Same tramlines each year.

    Both methods have pros and cons I guess. Personally with gps almost universal I think I'd like to have something growing in the tramlines nowadays - even if it is short slightly green corn!

    p.s. i know elmsted loves the 25 degrees to the previous crop thing and I do it most of the time and can see its merits but the best stands of some of my crops this year have been parallel with the previous crop. Or maybe because the spring is so slow the establishment is still more obscured.
    Quote Originally Posted by sumo1 View Post
    I think I would draw a line if the tramlines were deeper than 5-6 inches, any less would drill ok, anymore would need loosening/levelling.

    We are definately finding that tramlines are far deeper on ex ploughed crops than min-tilled.
    Think it sort of says a lot of it. After time of no tilling the field will carry traffic much better than worked land. As our resident Dale drill poster said after harvest last year combine left no marks and that is on some of Leicestershire or Rutlands finest land.

    There are merits to spring no till with precision GPS or steering kit following wide spaced crops like grain maize. Thing about it is after a while doing it same way the field ends up like a mini potato field. Also as technology gets better going same way means the drill tractor always runs in same place every year. Also if worked at angle the ability to clear trash gets better. As a row moves from cropped to uncropped.

    Drilling rape up a wheat row or the other way round hardly likely to give you even cropping in that particular row for the list of obvious reasons.

    But of course some fields are a problem. Because of shape. but if like most the combine driver opens up using tramlines then same way farming means combine same place each year, the trailers go same way, the tramlines same place and the drill same place. Then drill and other stuff turn same place on headlands.

    Almost hardly a surprise that after some years the profile is like the Somme and compaction is bad. It is controlled compaction.

    Regards.

  29. #29
    sumo1
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    two pictures showing a tramline in the same field, one taken end of december, the second yesterday.

    as said before, second wheat.

  30. #30
    lee
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Unless your talking about really deep ruts there is no reason to ever rip tramlines up whether your DD, into CTF or min till.

    Surely the logical thing to do is put the tramlines in down the longest straightest hedge, or down the middle of the field and leave them in the same place every year.

    Farmers that go out every year with their two leg subsoilers ripping up tramlines is a totally pointless exercise that just wastes diesel.

    If you've got 10 deep ruts then fair enough level them off but the idea is that the crop doesn't grow in the tramlines so the soil there doesn't need to be perfect.

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