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Thread: direct drilling photo gallery?

  1. #31
    sumo1
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Two more pictures drilling beans,
    First one on failed rape 19-03-09,
    heavy land previously trio'd then vaderstad'
    nigh on perfect conditions.
    211kg/ha
    12L/Ha fuel

    Secondly today,
    on flooded first wheat, had to deal with a lot of tide mark trash

  2. #32
    Carpathian Cropper
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Great series of pictures there Mr Sumo. So good to see a British isles machine.

    Now that is over with. Can I as longer term Moore type drill user say something on the forum which we have spoken of.

    It is related to the posts here on tramlines. The best way to do the pre-emergent marking is to put the transport/turning wheels in float to mark it out. I reckon it is better than cutting a groove that gets wet and channels water. Sort of sets one up for deeper tramlines in wetter years.

    The rear wheels floating give a great mark, don't throw soil and firm things up a fair bit for the first sprayer or fert spreader pass. Sort of helps a lot in putting in the base of the tramline.

    But maybe difficult to plumb up using the electrics on tramline control.

  3. #33
    sumo1
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Quote Originally Posted by Elmsted View Post
    But maybe difficult to plumb up using the electrics on tramline control.
    we're working on it:lolk:

  4. #34
    silverfox
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    These picture's are Kalif osr direct drilled with the Horsch sprinter in sprayed off winter wheat stubble.

  5. #35
    silverfox
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    The result.

  6. #36
    Greg
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Elmsted & Sumo. I reckon after the ripper tynes tram lines will be a PINTA unless they are consolidated prior to getting saturated.
    Regards,
    Greg.

  7. #37
    Beretta
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Sumo, nice to see some good results from your drill. Are you going to produce a 3m version of the drill.

  8. #38
    Bread_Boy
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Some good looking rape here - drilled with 6m Claydon V drill behind an 8530!

  9. #39
    speccy
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Quote Originally Posted by lee View Post
    Unless your talking about really deep ruts there is no reason to ever rip tramlines up whether your DD, into CTF or min till.

    Surely the logical thing to do is put the tramlines in down the longest straightest hedge, or down the middle of the field and leave them in the same place every year.

    Farmers that go out every year with their two leg subsoilers ripping up tramlines is a totally pointless exercise that just wastes diesel.

    If you've got 10 deep ruts then fair enough level them off but the idea is that the crop doesn't grow in the tramlines so the soil there doesn't need to be perfect.
    apparently according to the new cross compliance regulations you can't have permanent tramlines that have bare soil on them due to run off/soil erosion.also interestingly they were talking about the possibility of not allowing mintill on slopes angled more than x degrees due to soil erosion-some of the steep land round my way is mintilled and you can see where its washing down the hills.not sure how true this is but i'm sure some of you will correct me...

    also lee i wouldn't have said that pulling up tramlines is a waste of time,as compaction doesn't just occur in a straight line down from the tramline bottom,surely it will also be pushing outwards too.if you add up all the area in between the tramlines and say a couple of feet either side that's not performing as it should due to compaction on a large farm that would surely add up to a few acres.if you imagine that as one field in that state i'm sure it would get pulled up.

    nice results sumo-was looking at your drill at lamma and it looks a decent bit of kit.

  10. #40
    WillScale
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Quote Originally Posted by speccy View Post
    apparently according to the new cross compliance regulations you can't have permanent tramlines that have bare soil on them due to run off/soil erosion.also interestingly they were talking about the possibility of not allowing mintill on slopes angled more than x degrees due to soil erosion-some of the steep land round my way is mintilled and you can see where its washing down the hills.not sure how true this is but i'm sure some of you will correct me...

    also lee i wouldn't have said that pulling up tramlines is a waste of time,as compaction doesn't just occur in a straight line down from the tramline bottom,surely it will also be pushing outwards too.if you add up all the area in between the tramlines and say a couple of feet either side that's not performing as it should due to compaction on a large farm that would surely add up to a few acres.if you imagine that as one field in that state i'm sure it would get pulled up.

    nice results sumo-was looking at your drill at lamma and it looks a decent bit of kit.

    do you mean it has to be ploughed instead of min tilled or not tilled at all?

  11. #41
    Tesla
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Drill accross the slopes then, rather than up and down - any runoff from tramlines will get caught by growing crop.

    Damned stupid idea re banning mintill on slopes - how the heck do they think the hills etc got there in the first place? All our nice fields are nice cos the good soil over time has ended up at the bottom of the hill.

  12. #42
    Tesla
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Fuego spring beans drilled straight into stubbles at about 3 inches deep with modified sublift cultivator. Land has also been rolled. Stubbles sprayed off with glyphos. Row widths are 30cm. Would have prefered to have subsoiled the field the autumn before as the surface was a bit rutted.......but then I didnt own it in the autumn.

  13. #43
    SimonC
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    DD linseed last week, heavy rain straight after so I didn't get chance to harrow but I will have a look if it dries this week and maybe harrow before the seed starts growing. On some of the heavier bits of the field the slots are still wide open.

  14. #44
    honest john
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Quote Originally Posted by SimonC View Post
    DD linseed last week, heavy rain straight after so I didn't get chance to harrow but I will have a look if it dries this week and maybe harrow before the seed starts growing. On some of the heavier bits of the field the slots are still wide open.
    HI/
    Just an idear simon.
    What if you rounduped 48 hrs or so befor the drill.
    The green decaying materal,keeps the top moist,and keeps the sun off from bakeing the slot,till hopefully seed has taken hold.
    Good photos.
    JOHN.

  15. #45
    speccy
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Quote Originally Posted by WillScale View Post
    do you mean it has to be ploughed instead of min tilled or not tilled at all?
    Not sure Will as i only got the information secondhand,I had to hold the fort while the chap went to the meeting-I will try and get some clarification.I should imagine that ploughing would be acceptable as you can plough the soil back up the slopes but thats just my opinion.
    I wouldn't even begin to imagine what goes on in the minds of the people that dream these things up.....

    I agree with what you are saying too Tesla but I've got to say that as I mentioned in my previous post there is a couple of blocks of land quite close to me that are mintilled and the past three years since I moved here the steep areas at the top of the banks have been drilled every year and have failed every year-not saying thats down to any fault with any particular system as such but i'd be asking the question about wasted inputs on those areas of crop,and we are talking acres not just a patch here and there.

    To be fair they are very steep,buttock clenchingly so in places but maybe in that particular situation those areas would be better being under some kind of environmental scheme as being grassed down for example would slow down if not stop the erosion?

  16. #46
    WillScale
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    I know some say min till at the same depth creates a pan which can actually exacerbate erosion ie water runs off like a sheet at the lower level. Which is why then people advocate the plough. To me all this is dealing with the symptoms not the causes (as are buffer strips etc). In my humble opinion.

    Pic - Wheat grown on steep slopes in Chile. Looks like mid wales eh?

  17. #47
    speccy
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Quote Originally Posted by WillScale View Post
    I know some say min till at the same depth creates a pan which can actually exacerbate erosion ie water runs off like a sheet at the lower level. Which is why then people advocate the plough. To me all this is dealing with the symptoms not the causes (as are buffer strips etc). In my humble opinion.

    Pic - Wheat grown on steep slopes in Chile. Looks like mid wales eh?
    Interesting picture Will,just out of interest how would that crop be established?

  18. #48
    s.chiles
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    One of my customers, when we used to plough, had washout's on his land so deep that they were waist deep when you stood in them. Once we switched to direct drilling, we never had any. Apart from there being no stubble you would be hard pushed to see where the tramlines are on our direct drilled land. I use the same tramlines every year and drill in the same direction.

  19. #49
    Jim_Bullock
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Quote Originally Posted by WillScale View Post
    I know some say min till at the same depth creates a pan which can actually exacerbate erosion ie water runs off like a sheet at the lower level. Which is why then people advocate the plough. To me all this is dealing with the symptoms not the causes (as are buffer strips etc). In my humble opinion.

    Pic - Wheat grown on steep slopes in Chile. Looks like mid wales eh?
    Will and company....
    I think I have said several times on this forum that the more we go down the min-till route the more problems we seem to have... I stand to be damned by one and all but we are rapidly coming to the conclusion that you either direct-drill (little or no soil erosion) or if you have made a complete mess (and I mean a total balls-up due to rutting or uncontrollable weeds) then go in with the plough and start with a "clean sheet of paper". Learn from your mistakes and d-d the next time around...
    We did a total farm appraisal last friday (very depressing) and the conclusion was that all our direct drilled crops have potential with very low levels of black-grass and brome but where we messed about with shakerator and the Carrier plant numbers are much lower and the weed burden is such that we have decided to go in with glyphosate rather than Pacifica in several fields of winter wheat..this area will then go into grain maize...

  20. #50
    speccy
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Quote Originally Posted by s.chiles View Post
    One of my customers, when we used to plough, had washout's on his land so deep that they were waist deep when you stood in them. Once we switched to direct drilling, we never had any. Apart from there being no stubble you would be hard pushed to see where the tramlines are on our direct drilled land. I use the same tramlines every year and drill in the same direction.
    Looks good-What is the comparison in yield between the the ploughing and direct drilling?


    I'm not a die hard plough man by the way,if someone phones me up and asks me to drive a tractor ploughing or mintilling I'm not fussed either or!

  21. #51
    s.chiles
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Here is another one, this time spring triticale ( planted in the autumn) after lupins. I was trying to capture the contrast between the bright green of the emerging crop and the golden colour of the trees in the background rather than intending it to show the crop, however I think it usefully demonstrates the possibilities.

  22. #52
    s.chiles
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Quote Originally Posted by speccy View Post
    Looks good-What is the comparison in yield between the the ploughing and direct drilling?


    I'm not a die hard plough man by the way,if someone phones me up and asks me to drive a tractor ploughing or mintilling I'm not fussed either or!
    Although some of my customers have had their best yields ever when the crop was direct drilled I would say that to be fair they are probably about the same, however the longer the fields are direct drilled generally the better they are. We have had some good results and some disasters too, often where we have had the disasters it was in the same places or fields that we had disasters with a plough based system. I have noticed that if a crop fails under a plough based system that it is always the fault of the weather, slugs etc but if it fails in the same conditions when it's direct drilled its then the drills fault!!!

  23. #53
    WillScale
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Speccy - that was done with a semeato drill. beloved of guibraz1 of this forum.

    http://www.semeato.com.br/en_new/sit...maquinaDetalhe

    Don't get too depressed Jim that pic of the WW drilled with the kuhn this year looked like a crop full of promise, if that was round the whole farm you'd be sorted. Just a case of getting a few more pieces of the jigsaw together and a bit of luck!

  24. #54
    Tesla
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    If it fails at all then its no good. One field of wheat here was almost written off. Problem was it was rolled, then got inches of rain. Grain all popped - might have been fine had I not rolled it. Either way, its 25ac, but that to me is an expensive disaster (margin on 25ac pre rent would normally pay my basic wage). A lot of the problems we face on our farms are created by trying to incorporate residues, in particular wheat straw, and we have had much better results where we just forget what it looks like from the roadside and leave all the trash on the top.

  25. #55
    WillScale
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Tesla - All the experienced direct drillers tell me don't judge a crop too early. Chris Renner tells me his crops are very hard to discern until April.

    I think for the first few years you have to allow yourself the leeway of a few decent size cock ups. Do it while the sub is around I say. I'm learning DD WW after spring wheat is just a stupid thing to do on my farm - obvious I suppose but lesson learned now!

    SW after WW and mustard cover crop however...

  26. #56
    s.chiles
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tesla View Post
    If it fails at all then its no good.
    OK,this year of all my autumn planting, 25 acres that were ploughed and 14 acres that were min tilled have been redrilled. None that were direct drilled have been although one field that does still look poor is improving. As I only ploughed 30 acres in total does that mean that ploughing is no good? I don't think so. Each system has it's own merits and can be equally be affected by adverse weather conditions, flooding, slugs etc. Direct drilling is the favorite for me, despite requiring a higher level of management skill, because I save alot of time, diesel and metal, and reduce the number of hours my tractors work, thereby increasing profitability.

  27. #57
    Tesla
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Sorry, maybe typing "its no good" sounds different to my saying it with my accent! What I meant was, not that the system was no good, but the situation was no good.

    With "landlords prior charge", rent, rental equivalents, FBT rates, or whatever you are ok (here a combination of all, and all heading over 100/ac), I meant that 25ac with costly inputs on top of just getting the crop in the ground is "no good".

    New latitude dressed wheat seed + one fairly hot herbicide spray + the stuff in the ground, all times 25 is not great. For me, in this case the landlord will essentially keep the SFP as rent, and I will take the knock for the establishment, and the inputs. If you count the lost profit of a normal crop, that is my anual salary before profit-related bonuses!

    DD for me has to match what we do in the main in terms of yield and relaibility, and I am hoping that coming down to the open day will answer the key question for me - is DD a whole system for our farm, or just a "use when conditions allow" way to cut some establishment costs.

  28. #58
    Andrew Kerr
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tesla View Post
    Sorry, maybe typing "its no good" sounds different to my saying it with my accent! What I meant was, not that the system was no good, but the situation was no good.

    With "landlords prior charge", rent, rental equivalents, FBT rates, or whatever you are ok (here a combination of all, and all heading over 100/ac), I meant that 25ac with costly inputs on top of just getting the crop in the ground is "no good".

    New latitude dressed wheat seed + one fairly hot herbicide spray + the stuff in the ground, all times 25 is not great. For me, in this case the landlord will essentially keep the SFP as rent, and I will take the knock for the establishment, and the inputs. If you count the lost profit of a normal crop, that is my anual salary before profit-related bonuses!

    DD for me has to match what we do in the main in terms of yield and relaibility, and I am hoping that coming down to the open day will answer the key question for me - is DD a whole system for our farm, or just a "use when conditions allow" way to cut some establishment costs.

    Tesla,

    You have a Moore drill,so are well placed to DD when conditions allow?

  29. #59
    Hartwig
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Picture of DDing beans on 22nd march '09 into wheat stubble and one picture of DDing barley around 17th september '08 into bean-stubble with a lot of volunteers due to hail-damage and the other picture how it looks today. It's a bad patch because of sticky loam and grass-weeds, the rest of the field looks better - but I think it's imortant to photograph the worst parts and observe how it goes on. If there is no problem, it's hard to learn from...

    Hartwig

  30. #60
    doorknob
    Guest

    Re: direct drilling photo gallary?

    Hartwig
    but I think it's imortant to photograph the worst parts and observe how it goes on. If there is no problem, it's hard to learn from...
    Well put. I tend to concentrate the attention to the trouble areas.

    Thanks for the pics.

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