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Thread: Cattle Shed Lighting

  1. #1
    foxbox
    Guest

    Cattle Shed Lighting

    We are in the process of moving our cattle housing for this winter into a new shed. The shed is 55 feet wide, 6 20 foot bays long and 14 feet to the eves, feed passage down one side, all penning done with gates and hurdles hopefully reducing shadows. We will split the 6 bays in to 3 pens which will house the calving cows so we need to be able to light the building sufficiently to make night calvings easier, that means fast start up (rules out sodiums??) and relatively cheap to run in case they have to be left on for any length of time.

    So, how do we do it? One suggestion from an electrician is pairs of 6 foot fluorescent tubes, one pair per bay and staggered approx 15 feet in from the eves either side so that as you look up the shed bay 1 has a pair on the left of the ridge, bay 2 pair on the right etc. Will this be bright enough?

    Any other ideas worth considering? Our old sheep building had traditional 100w bulbs in, we tried changing these for energy saving ones (nicer light, whiter and cheaper to run) but they really didnít like the cold and rarely lasted more than a season. As the 100w traditional bulbs have gone these are no longer an option any more

    Thanks, foxbox

  2. #2
    hilly bill
    Guest

    Re: Cattle Shed Lighting

    Quote Originally Posted by foxbox View Post
    We are in the process of moving our cattle housing for this winter into a new shed. The shed is 55 feet wide, 6 20 foot bays long and 14 feet to the eves, feed passage down one side, all penning done with gates and hurdles hopefully reducing shadows. We will split the 6 bays in to 3 pens which will house the calving cows so we need to be able to light the building sufficiently to make night calvings easier, that means fast start up (rules out sodiums??) and relatively cheap to run in case they have to be left on for any length of time.

    So, how do we do it? One suggestion from an electrician is pairs of 6 foot fluorescent tubes, one pair per bay and staggered approx 15 feet in from the eves either side so that as you look up the shed bay 1 has a pair on the left of the ridge, bay 2 pair on the right etc. Will this be bright enough?

    Any other ideas worth considering? Our old sheep building had traditional 100w bulbs in, we tried changing these for energy saving ones (nicer light, whiter and cheaper to run) but they really didnít like the cold and rarely lasted more than a season. As the 100w traditional bulbs have gone these are no longer an option any more

    Thanks, foxbox
    If not sodium the fluorescent as yer man suggests but i would go for sodium and be patient LED would be good but i would think they will be far to expensive for the job

  3. #3
    4wd
    Guest

    Re: Cattle Shed Lighting

    We installed fluorescents in 1985, just worked it out as they are about due for replacing since the housings are rusting away (but still work!)
    I'm plannng to replace with a couple of low energy bulb fittings for 'low light' and two floods of some kind when I want it bright.
    The fewer floodlighhts would need less wiring which is a significant cost these days.

  4. #4
    Timbo_1975
    Guest

    Re: Cattle Shed Lighting

    Sodium or Metal Halide is the way to go, but for faster startup, could you put afew Fluro's in acouple of bays for instance with Sodiums either end ?

    I have a cattle shed with 5 Sodiums either side down the central feed passage shining into the pens with 2 fluro's in the middle where the 6th sodium might be. Works fine. Whichever, put more smaller wattage up than less larger. The fluro's will need to be IP67 rated fully enclosed flavours.

  5. #5
    NeilO
    Guest

    Re: Cattle Shed Lighting

    Quote Originally Posted by 4wd View Post
    We installed fluorescents in 1985, just worked it out as they are about due for replacing since the housings are rusting away (but still work!)
    I'm plannng to replace with a couple of low energy bulb fittings for 'low light' and two floods of some kind when I want it bright.
    The fewer floodlighhts would need less wiring which is a significant cost these days.
    We replaced a couple of striplights in the lambing shed with some 100W low energy bulbs 2 years ago, thinking we'd have more light, less bulb changes & lower leccy bills. Absolute waste of time, as they were dimmer from the start and several of the 'loops' have failed already (barely used other than at lambing time). Since found out that low energy bulbs really don't like operating in low temperatures or damp conditions, so most places in a livestock building in the winter really. Striplights going back in for this winter.

  6. #6
    sprocket
    Guest

    Re: Cattle Shed Lighting

    In our cattle shed. 50ft wide with 15ft bays, we have 4 5ft flourescent singles per bay evenley spaced out. Put on plenty of switches as you only need some on at any time.Our shed is 10ft at eves, but with all lights on you can do any job easily.

  7. #7
    Deereone
    Guest

    Re: Cattle Shed Lighting

    I replaced 45 X 100watt strip lights with 6 X 150 watt metal halide; apart from the obvious saving it has stopped the 30 milliamp trip from going in damp weather.

  8. #8
    Exfarmer
    Guest

    Re: Cattle Shed Lighting

    strips are the obvious choice they will give the most light for your money
    they are also the most energy efficent unless you go for very large number of LED`s
    most of the energy efficent bulbs are in fact a form of fluorescent lighting

  9. #9
    Red Bull
    Guest

    Re: Cattle Shed Lighting

    I would use strip lights, i find few floodlights leave too many shadows compared to more strips. As said by someone else, put them on more than one switch so you only put them all on when you really need them. If you're going to leave some light on all night install a light sensor on some, the lights will come on at dusk and go out in the morning, some of the lights in our cubicle shed are wired up like this. If you only want light at certain times of the day install a timeclock, the other lights in our cubicle shed are wired to one of these, the lights come on early evening and go out about 10 then come back on 1/2 hour before milking time in the morning.

  10. #10
    defender
    Guest

    Re: Cattle Shed Lighting

    rewired a cattle shed last year and put in metal halide bulkhead lights ,very good and much better than the strip lights they replaced and no worries about the damp ,dont need so many and cheaper to run.
    fitted just below roof hieght and staggered alternate bays , similar to this
    http://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Products/PWGPF80.html

  11. #11
    Archie
    Guest

    Re: Cattle Shed Lighting

    Got a new shed up last year and just went with what both builders who quoted went for.

    Metal halides in grain store and external but strip lights in cattle shed. Good even light over the full shed.

  12. #12
    foxbox
    Guest

    Re: Cattle Shed Lighting

    Thanks for the replies so far, looks like strip lights are up there with the best options but will also get some prices for the other options mentioned too. Funny how in the old sheds we worked with and put up with whatever was in there but when putting up a new shed it's become an issue with no clear right answer

  13. #13
    defender
    Guest

    Re: Cattle Shed Lighting

    its maybe a good job standard light bulbs are becoming hard to get and I know low energy bulbs dont fit every situation but they save a bit of money if lights are on all night ,we have a pig shed that has 60 light bulbs on all the time and comparing low energy bulbs against standard 60 watt bulbs saves about £1800 per year

  14. #14
    fermerboy
    Guest

    Re: Cattle Shed Lighting

    We have a 100ft by 60ft, 14ft eaves cattle shed with 1 150w Metal Halide floodlight mounted high up in the gable at each end.
    Its ok but I find it a bit dim if you are needing to work with cattle(calving etc)
    Our new one is 120ft by 40ft, 16ft eaves and had the same 150w Metal Halide floodlight at each end and a pair in the middle facing each way.
    Think this should be enough most of the time.
    Haven't finished wiring yet so can't confirm my thinking!
    Neighbour has put in flourescents in his new one, his sparky wouldn't hear of any other option at the height we are at. A lot more wiring though.

    These are ours, http://www.scldirect.co.uk/metal-hal...with-lamp.html

    Our lights are these from these folk, good price and quick delivery too.
    All the lights for that 120 by 40 for £120 can't be bad.

  15. #15
    4wd
    Guest

    Re: Cattle Shed Lighting

    Quote Originally Posted by fermerboy View Post
    We have a 100ft by 60ft, 14ft eaves cattle shed with 1 150w Metal Halide floodlight mounted high up in the gable at each end.
    Its ok but I find it a bit dim if you are needing to work with cattle(calving etc)
    Our new one is 120ft by 40ft, 16ft eaves and had the same 150w Metal Halide floodlight at each end and a pair in the middle facing each way.
    Think this should be enough most of the time.
    Haven't finished wiring yet so can't confirm my thinking!
    Neighbour has put in flourescents in his new one, his sparky wouldn't hear of any other option at the height we are at. A lot more wiring though.

    These are ours, http://www.scldirect.co.uk/metal-hal...with-lamp.html

    Our lights are these from these folk, good price and quick delivery too.
    All the lights for that 120 by 40 for £120 can't be bad.
    I was thinking one of these or similar each end of my 80ftx40ft cubicle house would do (plus the two low-energies for dim light)
    Or how about two mounted together near the middle - pointing outwards?

  16. #16
    awj26
    Guest

    Re: Cattle Shed Lighting

    Quote Originally Posted by 4wd View Post
    I was thinking one of these or similar each end of my 80ftx40ft cubicle house would do (plus the two low-energies for dim light)
    Or how about two mounted together near the middle - pointing outwards?

    You would have more shadows at either end if you did this.

  17. #17
    fermerboy
    Guest

    Re: Cattle Shed Lighting

    Quote Originally Posted by 4wd View Post
    I was thinking one of these or similar each end of my 80ftx40ft cubicle house would do (plus the two low-energies for dim light)
    Or how about two mounted together near the middle - pointing outwards?
    That would do fine.
    One high up on each gable end is what I would go for. Go for two back to back on the middle as well if you want a good light. This is what I've got on our 120ft shed. I have got one on each gable on an 80 by 40 barn.
    The question is do you need it lit up like Blackpool?

    The way its raining here tonight that's tomorrows job to get some of this wiring finished and see if I've enough lights in!

  18. #18
    Orcadian
    Guest

    Re: Cattle Shed Lighting

    Refreshing this thread, we have decided to go metal halide but there are a few different designs so I thought I would ask on here .There are the ones that Defender went for and different again the ones fermerboy used and the ones below which look better both to fix and appearance.???????????????

  19. #19
    daven
    Guest

    Re: Cattle Shed Lighting

    These little things really put out the light......... I see there are 20 and 30 watt ones also......

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/OXLUX-Floodl...7031480&sr=8-1

  20. #20
    BigW
    Guest

    Re: Cattle Shed Lighting

    Speak to cowcare systems they do really good lights for buildings, we have them in two of our buildings and going to do a third soon. Every sparky that sees them is impressed with the quality of them.

  21. #21
    Fergieman
    Guest

    Re: Cattle Shed Lighting

    Think these are the lights Cowcare systems supply. Deboer also supply them in the UK.

    http://www.agrilight.nl/en/general/home/

  22. #22
    darkness
    Guest

    Re: Cattle Shed Lighting

    They look good but a shame the price makes them not worth it.

  23. #23
    Orcadian
    Guest

    Re: Cattle Shed Lighting

    Quote Originally Posted by darkness View Post
    They look good but a shame the price makes them not worth it.
    Had a look on their web page but couldnt find a price,have you enquired?

  24. #24
    darkness
    Guest

    Re: Cattle Shed Lighting

    I did and someone mentioned the price they paid on here some time ago and you are talking a few grand for the lights. I think that was for a 100ft shed.

  25. #25
    foxbox
    Guest

    Re: Cattle Shed Lighting

    In the end we went with 4 foot, twin tube IP rated fluorescents, mounted one to a bay alternating either side of the shed. The output from them is fantastic, a very clean light which is proving ideal for calving cows. As we have many light sources shadows have been virtually eliminated, this was a problem we had in a previous shed where we used floodlighting instead.


    We have also mounted 3 energy saving fittings along the ridge line which we leave on all night. They provide enough background light for our camera to work without the place resembling an operating theatre. We have also used a GSM dialler in the shed so that if we want more light we can ring it, turning the main lights on remotely.

    The system worked exceptionally well in our first winter and I see no need to spend any more than this on lighting a suckler cow shed. I'm sure expensive lighting may have a place in dairy sheds but not in beef units.

  26. #26
    514
    Guest

    Re: Cattle Shed Lighting

    I replaced 3 250w metal halide lights thst had rotted away after ten years with 2 90w led lights last winter and i'm very pleased with them.
    total power consumption reduced from 900w to 180w with as much light, they're in the parlour and so get plenty of use, the extra cost will be saved before the 3 year warranty runs out on them.I have ordered 3 more to replace the metal halides as they fail and i'm also going to try a led retrofit for some of our flourescent tubes. They came from www.modoledlights.com

  27. #27
    darkness
    Guest

    Re: Cattle Shed Lighting

    I have yet to try some of these LED lights and I wouldn't mind seeing some of these led street lights in action as I need a few yard lights that need to be left on for several hours and metal halide can be sore on juice when you have a number of them running.

  28. #28
    COWCARE SYSTEMS
    Guest

    Re: Cattle Shed Lighting

    Quote Originally Posted by darkness View Post
    They look good but a shame the price makes them not worth it.
    Please do not confuse the matter of a simulated daylight lighting system with installing a few lights to prevent you bumping into things when it's dark.
    Yes the system is not cheap at first glance, but do your sums and you soon realise it makes sence.
    Fitting basic lights is a cost that will will see no return on investment, where as the Agrilight system pays for itself in under 12 months. What's more it continues to pay every year thereafter.

  29. #29
    Reggie Hammond
    Guest

    Re: Cattle Shed Lighting

    Quote Originally Posted by COWCARE SYSTEMS View Post
    Please do not confuse the matter of a simulated daylight lighting system with installing a few lights to prevent you bumping into things when it's dark.
    Yes the system is not cheap at first glance, but do your sums and you soon realise it makes sence.
    Fitting basic lights is a cost that will will see no return on investment, where as the Agrilight system pays for itself in under 12 months. What's more it continues to pay every year thereafter.
    Then explain to us all how Agrilight systems pays for itself in under 12 months because I have yet to hear one person explain how the price is justified?

    Your saying, I spend £3500 on Agrilights and I will make that back?

    I am all on for making a return but I need details.

  30. #30
    COWCARE SYSTEMS
    Guest

    Re: Cattle Shed Lighting

    Reggie, I will post documented data ASAP. But the Maths is quite simple.
    Fistly fertility- Every day you can reduce your calving index is a saving of £5.40 per cow.
    Secondly milk yield- harder to quantify due to a lot of external factors but once again the facts recorded in independent university trials are as follows. 6% increased yield is guaranteed under ANY management regime. Increases of over 14 % recorded, most customers average 10%
    Now I'm no mathematician but seems to add up.

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