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Thread: Mr Mzuri

  1. #1
    henery
    Guest

    Mr Mzuri

    Weather permitting am going to visit Mr Lole and have a look see on Friday. Any thoughts from anyone using a Mzuri, or with crops in the ground planted with one?

  2. #2
    fred
    Guest

    Re: Mr Mzuri

    My 10 acres looks ok will post some photos soon

  3. #3
    Seat Right Back
    Guest

    Re: Mr Mzuri

    same here

  4. #4
    strip-till-phil
    Guest

    Re: Mr Mzuri

    Well get some pictures on then lets have a look

    We only really see the Claydon ones on here be nice to see other one pass drilled crops

  5. #5
    autopilot
    Guest

    Re: Mr Mzuri

    We've had Mzuri, Claydon with older type V drill and Seed Hawk all drill in the same field this year. Difficult to make comparisons at this stage - prefer to wait until combined.

  6. #6
    Martin Lole
    Guest

    Re: Mr Mzuri

    Quote Originally Posted by no-till-phil View Post
    Well get some pictures on then lets have a look

    We only really see the Claydon ones on here be nice to see other one pass drilled crops
    Hi Phil

    Yes it would be interesting to see a few more photos of crops drilled with other makes of machinery.

    On our farm this autumn, all crops were established with the Mzuri Pro-Til direct drilling into the undisturbed stubbles with the entire previous crop residue remaining on the surface.
    No cultivation, straw rakes at all; just the one pass drilling operation with the option of rolling.
    Tramlines remain as the previous year, drilling alternatively at 30 degrees to the existing tramlines.

    I see huge improvements in crop establishment when recognizing the benefits of controlled traffic combined with conservation tillage (all previous crop residue remaining on the surface) if we are to avoid moisture loss and the deteration of the soil structure.

    With the Mzuri we really are benefitting from the best of both worlds: -
    Improved organic matter of ‘no-till’ and the aerobic tilled strip of conventional tillage.

    Plus the additional benefits of band placement of P & K below the seed for quick healthy growth and the seed placed in the optimum environment of clean, trash free, tilled moist soil.
    All at a fraction of the costs associated with conventional tillage.

    Below are a few photos of autumn’s crops. Drilling dates were stretched out because both drills were out on demonstrations throughout the week.

    1)OSR drilled into WW stubble c/w chopped straw @ 2.2 kg/ha. 3rd week August. No rolls
    2) A closer look at pic 1, this is the same field as in http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kj8a_...e_gdata_player
    3) Gallant into W.Beans stubble @ 160 kg/ha, 3rd week Sept
    4) Gallant into S.Linseed stubble @ 180 kg/ha, 1st week Oct
    5) Gallant into OSR stubble @ 180 kg/ha 4th week Sept
    6) Gallant into standing mustard @ 160 kg/ha 3rd week Sept

  7. #7
    henery
    Guest

    Re: Mr Mzuri

    Looking foreword to meeting you tomorrow! Weather permitting, coming down with Steve Corfield, lots of questions I'm afraid.
    One question, in case I forget.....have you any experience of planting forage maize with your drill?

  8. #8
    Martin Lole
    Guest

    Re: Mr Mzuri

    Quote Originally Posted by henery View Post
    Looking foreword to meeting you tomorrow! Weather permitting, coming down with Steve Corfield, lots of questions I'm afraid.
    One question, in case I forget.....have you any experience of planting forage maize with your drill?
    So far very limited experience, limited to cover crops, although very encouraging.
    We will gain far more experience over the next few years as I believe strip-tillage c/w fertilizer placement to be the most logical way to establish maize.
    In the States a greater acreage of maize is established with strip tillage than any other crop.

    Looking forward to meeting you.

  9. #9
    Andrew Kerr
    Guest

    Re: Mr Mzuri

    Martin,

    Your crops look well, must be something in this fert placement idea!

    Our rape is less forward due to running out of soil N i think,but still well rooted and established.

    Like yourself, i have retained all chopped straw on the surface,no regrets about not baling anything.I am sure its for the long term good.

    Andrew.

  10. #10
    autopilot
    Guest

    Re: Mr Mzuri

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Kerr View Post
    Martin,
    Our rape is less forward due to running out of soil N i think,but still well rooted and established.
    Andrew.
    +1
    Our rape has gone the same way and I am sure you are right; it has run out of N. We didn't drill rape with a Mzuri or Claydon, but with a converted flatlift, so its not the drill.

  11. #11
    henery
    Guest

    Re: Mr Mzuri

    Put 30 kg n on mine post drilling, left a little patch untreated, what a contrast! Much bigger plant tops, but if anything the root is longer where no N.

  12. #12
    henery
    Guest

    Re: Mr Mzuri

    Martin, thanks very much for your time today, very impressive !, drove home with much food for thought.

  13. #13
    Martin Lole
    Guest

    Re: Mr Mzuri

    Quote Originally Posted by henery View Post
    Martin, thanks very much for your time today, very impressive !, drove home with much food for thought.
    It was a great pleasure.

    You showed a keen interest in cover crops, although I have far less experience than yourself I think we both agree on their benefits.

    To date I have found cover crops easy to establish and likewise easy to drill directly into.

    Noticeable benefits:
    1.The cover crop retains moisture and improves soil texture.

    2.The Mzuri drill planted the seed accurately below the crop residue therefore the following crop germinated very quickly, evenly and has remained looking healthy.

    3.Provides the ideal soil environment for each seed to germinate quickly and grow to achieve its full potential.


    Here is a link to the Mzuri Pro-Til direct drilling winter milling wheat directly into a full crop of mustard. No pre drilling chemicals, however we put a splash of ‘Pixie’ with the pre/post emergences herbicides.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aavCWJ6Dw5c

  14. #14
    Elmsted
    Guest

    Re: Mr Mzuri

    Martin good film show thanks. Regards your comment on pre/post emergent herbicides and my aversion to SU based products full stop. What please is pixie.

    Seasonal greetings.

    Elmsted.

  15. #15
    autopilot
    Guest

    Re: Mr Mzuri

    Quote Originally Posted by Elmsted View Post
    What please is pixie.
    Herbicide from Nufarm UK. Contains a mix of DFF and Mecoprop-P.

  16. #16
    fred
    Guest

    Re: Mr Mzuri

    heres mine.
    Scout after spring beans

  17. #17
    MJB
    Guest

    Re: Mr Mzuri

    Fred,

    How does that compare to any other system same drilling date and soil type etc?

    Looks quite sparse to me, I would have expected almost full ground cover by now.

    Matt

  18. #18
    fred
    Guest

    Re: Mr Mzuri

    Matt

    here are a couple of photos of headland and part not drilled with Mzuri, this was sumo trioed, cultivated and drilled with Horsch.

    I am pleased with all emergence as at one time i thought it was going to be troublesome, i must admit though the mzuri drilled stuff hit the ground running and chitted and emerged within 7-10 days whereas some of my other wheat was a bit longer.

  19. #19
    fred
    Guest

    Re: Mr Mzuri

    heres a couple of the drilling, we had afew people visit,

  20. #20
    clodhopper
    Guest

    Re: Mr Mzuri

    I like the concept of the Mzuri Drill very much, can we expect to see a 6m version anytime soon?

  21. #21
    Devon James
    Guest

    Re: Mr Mzuri

    Quote Originally Posted by clodhopper View Post
    I like the concept of the Mzuri Drill very much, can we expect to see a 6m version anytime soon?
    How much Horsepower do you have?
    What in particular do you like in the Mzuri concept compared to the more established Claydon technique?

  22. #22
    clodhopper
    Guest

    Re: Mr Mzuri

    I have 400hp.

    I like the more aggressive, negative raked leading tine which I concider to be more effective at eliminating compaction, I also like the idea of a cleated tyre preparing/consolidating in front of the seed coulter, I think the rear press wheel is useful in ensuring seed to soil contact and I like the fertilizer option.

    That said, I'm not (yet) a direct driller, and they are just by-standers observations.

    Any comments/thoughts would be welcome!

  23. #23
    Willscale
    Guest

    Re: Mr Mzuri

    Quote Originally Posted by clodhopper View Post
    I have 400hp.

    I like the more aggressive, negative raked leading tine which I concider to be more effective at eliminating compaction, I also like the idea of a cleated tyre preparing/consolidating in front of the seed coulter, I think the rear press wheel is useful in ensuring seed to soil contact and I like the fertilizer option.

    That said, I'm not (yet) a direct driller, and they are just by-standers observations.

    Any comments/thoughts would be welcome!
    Seed to soil contact and packing soil on top of the seed are different things.

    I still think its odd when farmers talk of the germinating seed needing oxygen (and therefore a bit of subsurface tillage to get "air" in underneath) the seed but then want to pack it down above the seed and displace or destroy old pores.

    Happy new year all.

  24. #24
    Andrew Kerr
    Guest

    Re: Mr Mzuri

    Will,

    One of the reasons i bought a Pro Til drill concerns its real ability to mill down clods and produce a better tilth with the cleated depth wheels, yet retain moisture with a following flex wheel.

    If i were on lighter free draining soil i would consider a JD or other disc drill, but the tine approach works for us 95% of the time on our Windsor and Hanslope series clays.

    Even after 8 yrs of using DD i remain convinced that a front tine system is the best compromise for us,as it can cope with a wide variation in conditions and sow most crops well. I believe Vaderstad and Horsch are now starting to appreciate that if new prototype models come to fruition.

  25. #25
    Willscale
    Guest

    Re: Mr Mzuri

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Kerr View Post
    I believe Vaderstad and Horsch are now starting to appreciate that if new prototype models come to fruition.
    Hmm possibly.

    Equally it could be possible that they have not designed a coulter capable of no tilling properly - certainly in Horsch's case this is true as the seeding coulters usually involve the same old small double disc coulters on a spring which is not capable of providing the downpressure necessary (no parallel linkage etc.) which is why there is all sorts of cultivation stuff going on in front of these drills - to make up for the fact that the coulter is still a 1960's style coulter but dressed up with newer cultivation gear around it.

    In Vaderstads case the Rapid is potentially 80% of a direct drill but lacks the things of crucial importance - seed firming? No, slot closing in tougher soils? - No.

    Sorry - gone of the Mzuri topic!

  26. #26
    Andrew Kerr
    Guest

    Re: Mr Mzuri

    Will,

    Vaddy already have a good No till coulter in the SeedHawk,its just that they realise its not offering strip till to their customers who are presumably asking for deeper loosening capability when required?

  27. #27
    Martin Lole
    Guest

    Re: Mr Mzuri

    Quote Originally Posted by Willscale View Post
    Seed to soil contact and packing soil on top of the seed are different things.

    I still think its odd when farmers talk of the germinating seed needing oxygen (and therefore a bit of subsurface tillage to get "air" in underneath) the seed but then want to pack it down above the seed and displace or destroy old pores.

    Happy new year all.
    Hi Will

    Come and visit us!

    Disc direct drills have been used in the UK for well over 30 years. If they reliably produced consistent yields on all soil types, they would be common practice.

    Recently, like yourself my colleagues and I visited the last three No-Till Alliance Days. It is time for you (and any other interested farmers that attended those days) to visit our farm.

    You will see that all crops have been drilled directly into stubble, complete with surface straw and with a variation of soil types. You will observe equal friable soil structure across each and every field, including all headlands; likewise the crops are even and healthy corner to corner. No reliance on any other type of cultivator, plough or power harrow.

    A visit to our farm will give you a better understanding of the Mzuri Strip Till System.

    I would like to wish you all a Happy New Year.

  28. #28
    clodhopper
    Guest

    Re: Mr Mzuri

    Martin,

    Do you intend offering wider models?

  29. #29
    Jim Bullock
    Guest

    Re: Mr Mzuri

    clodhoppper...
    If you consider the DD route...you will not need 400hp...and you would be suprised just how many acres (or ha's) you can cover with a narrower drill..We have a four metre Kuhn and with a few acres of spring crops we could easily drill 2500-3000 acres a year with 150hp upfront..

  30. #30
    Enry
    Guest

    Re: Mr Mzuri

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Bullock View Post
    clodhoppper...
    If you consider the DD route...you will not need 400hp...and you would be suprised just how many acres (or ha's) you can cover with a narrower drill..We have a four metre Kuhn and with a few acres of spring crops we could easily drill 2500-3000 acres a year with 150hp upfront..
    And that is why we have to open up our minds and stop doing what we always did....The amount of diesel and metal in use on some farms is scary - I think that the Mzuri ticks a lot of boxes and would love to see the results in the flesh at some stage

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