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Thread: any ideas

  1. #31
    Mr Bean
    Guest

    Re: any ideas



    This picture was taken last February. A leaf tissue test was sent off and then the area immediately sprayed with manganese. The spray made no difference and the leaf tissue test came back low in manganese and magnesium. After advice from Plumbo, I gave it a dose of phosphite, manganese & magnesium. There was an almost immediate response, but a second dose was needed later on. What ever the problem, I think a bit of phosphite in the mix can give the plant a useful kick.

    The field was wheat, direct drilled into OSR stubble, on light land. If you look carefully, the drill tractor wheelings can be seen, and also the combine wheelings running at a diagonal to the drilling. The black lump in the picture is top dressed compost!

  2. #32
    DX 3.90
    Guest

    Re: any ideas

    Hi, this is my first post so here goes.. it looks as though you have similar problems to us in previous years, on dark sandy ground, one field inparticular, it lacks manganese, but the problem is made many times worse by lack of consolidation! i.e the wheeling from the drill and roller tractors grew ok yet the rest needed several passes with manganese.

  3. #33
    SKIMMER
    Guest

    Re: any ideas

    Quote Originally Posted by TAG Direct View Post
    No way, not in isolation. Possibly several factors (herbicide damage, sulphur deficiency and Mn deficiency) all exacerbating each other.
    As already said the problem is in fields sprayed with Atlantis,Mn is a big problem on this land and is applied as part of our spray routine.
    Sulphur is the only common factor on soil and tissue samples off any poor area's although P is short on one and K & B on another. Any help or idea's will be apprecciated as we really do need to find the problem.

    Mark

  4. #34
    SKIMMER
    Guest

    Re: any ideas

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Bean View Post


    This picture was taken last February. A leaf tissue test was sent off and then the area immediately sprayed with manganese. The spray made no difference and the leaf tissue test came back low in manganese and magnesium. After advice from Plumbo, I gave it a dose of phosphite, manganese & magnesium. There was an almost immediate response, but a second dose was needed later on. What ever the problem, I think a bit of phosphite in the mix can give the plant a useful kick.

    The field was wheat, direct drilled into OSR stubble, on light land. If you look carefully, the drill tractor wheelings can be seen, and also the combine wheelings running at a diagonal to the drilling. The black lump in the picture is top dressed compost!
    Thats exactly how this started off aapplied the same.only ours carried on going back.

  5. #35
    CORK
    Guest

    Re: any ideas

    Ever try Manganese Sulphate powder? (31% mn + Sulphur).

    We have some reasonably sandy land with high pH (nearly 8!) which always suffers from Mn deficiency. I have tried liquid Mn in the past with very little if any effect. However, I find the MnS terrific.

    +1 on lack of consolidation, this will always make trace element deficiencies worse.

    We have some WW which is showing up with Mn deficiency in the usual patches. I plan to spray it next week with MnS once ground conditions allow (no snow here, +10deg C).
    I'll take some pics tomorrow.

    MnS is also incredibly cheap but has some mixing restrictions.

    I am sure that the S in the product is also helping.

    C

  6. #36
    Clive
    Guest

    Re: any ideas

    looks like chronic manganese deficiency to me ?

    we get it here - spraying sorts it, rolling helps as well

    We have a field with patches this year, not so bad but not looking as good as they should, our agronomist thinks we have had some damage from Avadex application ??

  7. #37
    plumbo
    Guest

    Re: any ideas

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Bean View Post


    This picture was taken last February. A leaf tissue test was sent off and then the area immediately sprayed with manganese. The spray made no difference and the leaf tissue test came back low in manganese and magnesium. After advice from Plumbo, I gave it a dose of phosphite, manganese & magnesium. There was an almost immediate response, but a second dose was needed later on. What ever the problem, I think a bit of phosphite in the mix can give the plant a useful kick.

    The field was wheat, direct drilled into OSR stubble, on light land. If you look carefully, the drill tractor wheelings can be seen, and also the combine wheelings running at a diagonal to the drilling. The black lump in the picture is top dressed compost!

    Reply

    Phosphite will not do it. It has to be a phosphite/phosphate product with adequate Mn Mg and in this case sulphate.

  8. #38
    walter melon
    Guest

    Re: any ideas

    Disgruntled neighbour rounduped for you in the dark?

  9. #39
    peasantman
    Guest

    Re: any ideas

    The photo posted by Mr Bean is exactly the problem that we have seen and sometimes it just gets worse despite Mn + Mg spray.

    I think its a combination of


    consolidation
    Mn
    Mg
    S
    N

    Lack of any of these will give symptoms shown on sandy soils. But we never see this problem in oats or rye or OSR for that matter - just in wheat and barley (which don't have manganese fixing bacteria round their roots).

    I am not sure that spraying on manganese sulphate contributes enough sulphate to do any good.

    What surprises me is how agronomists generally don't seem to have an answer to the problem.

    Trial plots definitely needed.

    What we used to do as a rescue measure was give it a bag to the acre of ammonium sulphate and maybe half a bag of ammonium nitrate. We also added some nitrate to the sprayer tank when we sprayed it with manganese and magnesium. So in the sprayer tank 5 kg/ha MnSO4, 5 Kg/ha Mg, 6 Kg/ha Ammomium Nitrate. It looked terrible, and the odd small patch was completely bald but it still did 3 ton. Could not roll it till it had recovered because feared burying the plants.

    Never considered phosphite. Don't know anything about it. We always had high phospate on the sand.

  10. #40
    Yorkie3
    Guest

    Re: any ideas

    Quote Originally Posted by SKIMMER View Post
    Cordial wheat , different fields,One ploughed power harrowed drilled rolled,one
    subsoiled drilled and the other done with a tri till, ph ok always spray well for
    mn PK ok wondering if atlantis has anything to do with it. Looks like to cut losses and redrill with spring wheat but I don't want to through good money after bad.
    Mark
    hi skimmer hate changing thread subject , but is it a philip watkins tri till and if so how do you rate it ?
    Thanks y3

  11. #41
    SKIMMER
    Guest

    Re: any ideas

    Quote Originally Posted by Yorkie3 View Post
    hi skimmer hate changing thread subject , but is it a philip watkins tri till and if so how do you rate it ?
    Thanks y3
    I only had it for a couple of days on demo but it seemed to do a good job. 2.4 metre behind a NH 6050, took it ok with legs down to 16" but would certainly want a bigger tractor if I was buying one.
    I opted for a new plough in the end.

  12. #42
    SKIMMER
    Guest

    Re: any ideas

    Quote Originally Posted by TAG Direct View Post
    No way, not in isolation. Possibly several factors (herbicide damage, sulphur deficiency and Mn deficiency) all exacerbating each other.
    Latest more in depth soil tests have come back showing a Cation exchange capacity of 4.9,and a high magnesium level possibly locking up the potash causing the plants to take in salt.

  13. #43
    SKIMMER
    Guest

    Re: any ideas

    Finally found the problem, Root knot nematode.How deal with it is now the problem.

  14. #44
    SKIMMER
    Guest

    Re: any ideas

    Quote Originally Posted by JCA View Post
    Could it be nematodes feeding on the roots? With the drier milder winter they could still be active but plant roots not regenerating quick enough to feed the crop.
    Just looked back and you were spot on.

  15. #45
    Col
    Guest

    Re: any ideas

    Quote Originally Posted by SKIMMER View Post
    Finally found the problem, Root knot nematode.How deal with it is now the problem.
    No way of dealing with it I'm afraid, get it quite a lot on light areas, only thing to do is get roots growing well in the autumn, make sure nutrition is spot on, maybe try spring crops, the other suggestion was long term grass

  16. #46
    hamish
    Guest

    Re: any ideas

    I have a couple of fields where it has reared its head this year, it seems very wide spread in one of the fields suggesting it has been there for years unnoticed. I have done quite a bit of investigation into the little blighters, rotation seems to be the most common answer. However from what I can work out, it seems to affect, cereals, legumes, rye grass and beet, so that leaves a pretty limited rotation.
    My plan is to carry on with my rotation as planned in the hope that it has only reared it's head due to the exceptionally dry back end. One of the fields is due to go into beet, I'm thinking about putting a nematacide to see if that does anything.

  17. #47
    CORK
    Guest

    Re: any ideas

    Interesting diagnosis.

    We had a lot of it in this region a few years ago. It occured when we had a very very warm spring.
    It seemed to especially effect spring wheat.

  18. #48
    kpa
    Guest

    Re: any ideas

    Quote Originally Posted by SKIMMER View Post
    Finally found the problem, Root knot nematode.How deal with it is now the problem.
    Have you have a tissue test? Don Huber in Mineral Nutrition & Plant Disease mentions low Silicon and low K as predisposing factors for the disease in rice or its roots with high Si had increased resistance it. Can't say we've knowingly had it
    Potassium silicate comes to mind, probably expensive.

  19. #49
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    16

    Re: any ideas

    Over 4 years late in contributing to this thread but I believe there are many studies showing phosphite reduces growth of root knot nematode ! (Don't tell anyone though it's "only a nutrient" 😊

  20. #50
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    4

    Re: any ideas

    Have you tried mapping your crops with specialist drones to provide an in-depth review of their health?

    Perhaps this could give some insight into whatís working and what isnít?

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