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Thread: sticky, rotation and rotation trials?

  1. #31
    kpa
    Guest

    Re: sticky, rotation and rotation trials?

    Quote Originally Posted by Willscale View Post
    ...S Barley may not be the daftest thing in the world either
    WW followed by rape & turnips grazed by sheep in Winter then tipple S barley yielded about 7+ t/ha 68kg/hl 1.53%N 98%germ, don't know what malting premium will be but stacks up well against WW.

    Spring beans look to be about 2t/ha good sample hardly any bruchid, also followed rape & turnips which came after a very ordinary 2nd WW.

  2. #32
    Tomsewell
    Guest

    Re: sticky, rotation and rotation trials?

    Wheat, rape, wheat, spring beans here. That way I get half the farm in 1st wheat, half in true break crops. All wheat group 1s (solstice and crusoe). Nice spread workload and quarter of the farm "available" for maintenance (trees, ditches, fences etc) over winter.

    Although margin not possibly as great on beans, following wheat always flies out of the blocks and dead easy to establish plus cash flow bonus not having to throw stacks of fert at it!

    Rape 1 year in 4 keeps agronomist happier as well.:lolk:

    Probably should be thinking of a cover crop pre spring beans?

  3. #33
    yellow belly
    Guest

    Re: sticky, rotation and rotation trials?

    Quote Originally Posted by Willscale View Post
    Spoke to a bloke yesterday whose DD spring beans did 2.5t/acre. it ain't a bad option surely?

    How about bringing in a spring wheat in or a late drilled ie Nov WW?

    WW/SW/SB/WOSR (bit late maybe/maybe not + herb residue)
    WW/WW/WOSR/cover/SB

    S Barley may not be the daftest thing in the world either
    what sort of soil are the beans on and how long has it been dd and how long since it was in a mixed farming rotation 10 30 or 50 years

  4. #34
    Willscale
    Guest

    Re: sticky, rotation and rotation trials?

    Quote Originally Posted by yellow belly View Post
    what sort of soil are the beans on and how long has it been dd and how long since it was in a mixed farming rotation 10 30 or 50 years
    He's on here and he lives in Essex and has a museum of direct drills so he will answer better than me

  5. #35
    SimonC
    Guest

    Re: sticky, rotation and rotation trials?

    Quote Originally Posted by yellow belly View Post
    what sort of soil are the beans on and how long has it been dd and how long since it was in a mixed farming rotation 10 30 or 50 years
    There has been a bit of a misunderstanding, the 2.5t/a beans were winters, not spring, but anyway very pleased with them. Looked good all year, got to 7 foot tall and didn't seem to get troubled with chocolate spot too badly.

    Fifth year dd, drilled with the Sim-tec into chopped/stripped straw on every other row, so 300mm spacing, 4 inches deep. Heavy London clay, half the field has no top soil either, other than the 2 inches I have managed to grow since starting no-till. Gave up the cows twentyfive years ago. The last 15 years it has had no phosphate or potash and no muck or compost since the cows went. Had plenty of Plumbo's concoctions over the years though, call them snake oil if you like, but works for me.

  6. #36
    kpa
    Guest

    Re: sticky, rotation and rotation trials?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tomsewell View Post
    Wheat, rape, wheat, spring beans here. That way I get half the farm in 1st wheat, half in true break crops. All wheat group 1s (solstice and crusoe). Nice spread workload and quarter of the farm "available" for maintenance (trees, ditches, fences etc) over winter.

    Although margin not possibly as great on beans, following wheat always flies out of the blocks and dead easy to establish plus cash flow bonus not having to throw stacks of fert at it!

    Rape 1 year in 4 keeps agronomist happier as well.:lolk:

    Probably should be thinking of a cover crop pre spring beans?
    What you should be thinking of, is a cover crop for sheep Winter grazing and then we would pay you to graze it off. Symbiotic relationship, you benefit by more readily available nutrients from the cover crop passing through the sheep + and we benefit with feed for sheep.

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