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Thread: Canberra

  1. #1
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    Canberra

    This has nothing to do with agricultural matters, but I could not restrain myself by not sharing!!!
    I took a friend to show them the Canberra at Elvington air museum. It is a Trainer version of the B2 bomber that I worked on in 27 Squadron at Scampton.
    Whilst looking at it we struck up a conversation with the young guy who was working on night fighter version of the meteor next door.
    When I was on the squadron we were allocated one particular aircraft as our special responsibility, but worked on all ten aircraft on the squadron. My aircraft was WH732. I gave the number to this guy and he got out his phone and traced WH 732 with an app or something. I thought it would have been scrapped long ago. Apparently it was in service until the late 60,s when it was sold to Venezuela.It flew for another 15 years but now resides in a museum in Venezuela.
    I was fascinated, it made my day!
    Jack Caley.
    By the way the last time I would see it would be 62 years ago!!

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    Re: Canberra

    Gonna wait for the dust to settle in Venezuela before you plan a trip?

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    Re: Canberra

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack_Caley View Post
    This has nothing to do with agricultural matters, but I could not restrain myself by not sharing!!!
    I took a friend to show them the Canberra at Elvington air museum. It is a Trainer version of the B2 bomber that I worked on in 27 Squadron at Scampton.
    Whilst looking at it we struck up a conversation with the young guy who was working on night fighter version of the meteor next door.
    When I was on the squadron we were allocated one particular aircraft as our special responsibility, but worked on all ten aircraft on the squadron. My aircraft was WH732. I gave the number to this guy and he got out his phone and traced WH 732 with an app or something. I thought it would have been scrapped long ago. Apparently it was in service until the late 60,s when it was sold to Venezuela.It flew for another 15 years but now resides in a museum in Venezuela.
    I was fascinated, it made my day!
    Jack Caley.
    By the way the last time I would see it would be 62 years ago!!
    On an ag. conference in Moscow & post conference tour in Ukraine in 1974, we flew from Lvov (now Lviv?) back to Moscow in a plane which looked pretty much like a copy of the Canberra.

    One door at the rear thru which everyone (including pilots, who walked up the aisle with rolled-up maps under their arms), two rows of seats on each side, one engine buried in each wing.

    before takeoff, the female cabin attendant gave us all barley sugar to chew, and before we landed she did the same. Didn't see her during the flight.

    As I remember the flight was ok, but when we landed the pilot cut the engines & hit the brakes - no reverse thrust available. I have no idea how long the runway was, but we rolled, and rolled... and rolled, right tot he end of the runway. I was sitting in a window seat on the left, and as we turned right, I could see the end of the bitumen below.

    When we reached the terminal, babushkas (?spelling - grandmothers) rushed out with hoses to cool the wheels.

    Soviet civil aviation at it's best at the time?

    JV
    Agtronix - the home of the Weedswiper

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    Wink Re: Canberra

    Quote Originally Posted by john maddock View Post
    On an ag. conference in Moscow & post conference tour in Ukraine in 1974, we flew from Lvov (now Lviv?) back to Moscow in a plane which looked pretty much like a copy of the Canberra.

    One door at the rear thru which everyone (including pilots, who walked up the aisle with rolled-up maps under their arms), two rows of seats on each side, one engine buried in each wing.

    before takeoff, the female cabin attendant gave us all barley sugar to chew, and before we landed she did the same. Didn't see her during the flight.

    As I remember the flight was ok, but when we landed the pilot cut the engines & hit the brakes - no reverse thrust available. I have no idea how long the runway was, but we rolled, and rolled... and rolled, right tot he end of the runway. I was sitting in a window seat on the left, and as we turned right, I could see the end of the bitumen below.

    When we reached the terminal, babushkas (?spelling - grandmothers) rushed out with hoses to cool the wheels.

    Soviet civil aviation at it's best at the time?

    JV
    The Russians had a habit of copying western aircraft, but I was not aware of a Canberra copy. It might have been possible, but with the main fuel tanks in the fuselage and the bombs underneath them, it would have been a bit cramped!!
    Reverse thrust did not come in to operation until much later. Reverse thrust propellers were probably the first. I remember seeing a C130 at Elvington air show doing about 60 mph backwards!! On the runway!!
    All good fun!
    If I remember correctly there are Canberras in a museum in NZ, whether there are in Australia I do not know. There is one still flying in the UKIthink.
    Jack Caley

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    Re: Canberra

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack_Caley View Post
    The Russians had a habit of copying western aircraft, but I was not aware of a Canberra copy. It might have been possible, but with the main fuel tanks in the fuselage and the bombs underneath them, it would have been a bit cramped!!
    Reverse thrust did not come in to operation until much later. Reverse thrust propellers were probably the first. I remember seeing a C130 at Elvington air show doing about 60 mph backwards!! On the runway!!
    All good fun!
    If I remember correctly there are Canberras in a museum in NZ, whether there are in Australia I do not know. There is one still flying in the UKIthink.
    Jack Caley
    Quite a few on display in Aus,:

    http://www.adf-serials.com/2a84a.htm

    JV
    Agtronix - the home of the Weedswiper

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    Re: Canberra

    Being of more tender years.....have to make do with tales of yore!
    Putting in time one afternoon in departures in a remote South American airport....we fell in with a Canadian couple.....he had worked in civil engineering.
    Job had taken him into the sort of North Western China and South Eastern USSR area. Transport was by Soviet passenger airliners.....Tupelovs??? Not sure now. But the story revolved around the dodgy landing gear that had a habit of not "locking" into position for landing.
    Soviet pilots solution was to climb as high as possible and then dive as fast as possible with the gear extended then pull up as suddenly as possible, thus encouraging the gear to lock in.
    Unfortunately this could take several repitions before it worked, personally I find landing the most stressful part of any flight....not seriously, but well you know what I mean......
    After half a dozen of the above efforts the sweat would be dripping!

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    Re: Canberra

    Quote Originally Posted by Gee View Post
    Being of more tender years.....have to make do with tales of yore!
    Putting in time one afternoon in departures in a remote South American airport....we fell in with a Canadian couple.....he had worked in civil engineering.
    Job had taken him into the sort of North Western China and South Eastern USSR area. Transport was by Soviet passenger airliners.....Tupelovs??? Not sure now. But the story revolved around the dodgy landing gear that had a habit of not "locking" into position for landing.
    Soviet pilots solution was to climb as high as possible and then dive as fast as possible with the gear extended then pull up as suddenly as possible, thus encouraging the gear to lock in.
    Unfortunately this could take several repitions before it worked, personally I find landing the most stressful part of any flight....not seriously, but well you know what I mean......
    After half a dozen of the above efforts the sweat would be dripping!
    This time last year we tried landing in the tail end of storm Katie in an Ethiad A380, seeing the runway go on and on in the belly camera and the flaps info on the screen as the computer fought the keep it level was a bit testing but eventually it was full power and a second attempt. That went better as the flight deck turned all the cameras off and the screens just showed the flight progress map
    The best thing about Facebook is the logout button......

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    Red face Re: Canberra

    [QUOTE=Gee;279563]Being of more tender years.....have to make do with tales of yore!
    Putting in time one afternoon in departures in a remote South American airport....we fell in with a Canadian couple.....he had worked in civil engineering.
    Job had taken him into the sort of North Western China and South Eastern USSR area. Transport was by Soviet passenger airliners.....Tupelovs??? Not sure now. But the story revolved around the dodgy landing gear that had a habit of not "locking" into position for landing.
    Soviet pilots solution was to climb as high as possible and then dive as fast as possible with the gear extended then pull up as suddenly as possible, thus encouraging the gear to lock in.
    Unfortunately this could take several repitions before it worked, personally I find landing the most stressful part of any flight....not seriously, but well you know what I mean......
    After half a dozen of the above efforts the sweat would be dripping![/QUOTE
    When I got my posting to 27 Squadron at Scampton we inherited some of the old Lincoln ground crew. One of them was an airframe mechanic called Sam from Hull. He and a mate went up in the last flight of the Lincoln. Instead of flying out in the wide blue yonder, the undercarriage would not lock up, so they spent the next couple of hours on the emergency hand pump in the fuselage pumping the undercarriage up and down until they got three greens!
    He was one of those disaster prone guys, we never left in peace about it!
    Jack Caley

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    Re: Canberra

    Another Soviet era story: the only other flight we took while on the tour was at night (all but one of our journeys was at night - we reckoned so we saw as little as possible) in a plane which looked pretty much like a Fokker F27, an Ilyushin (which we re-named the Illusion) something or other. At one stage the cabin filled with fog, presumably coz the aircon was dodgy, but the Russians on board thought we were a goner!

    JV
    Agtronix - the home of the Weedswiper

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    Re: Canberra

    My son who speaks fluent Spanish has sent me a photo of WH 732 actually in the museum in Venezuala. Trying to upload it on to the forum, but I still hate this i-pad
    Jack Caley

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