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Thread: WOSR in rows

  1. #31
    lordbonville
    Guest

    Re: WOSR in rows

    Quote Originally Posted by tchris View Post
    Went to a meeting yesterday about rape establishment presented by Agrovista and detailing results from 4 years of trials at there northallerton site.
    They reckon 40 -50 cm apart but also no more than 15 plants per linear meter.
    I agree with them that the best way to determine the quality of the plant is to dig one up and look at how the root looks.
    Learnt myself last year that if you plant to many to close you get poorer roots and poorer canopy resulting in loss of yield.
    I personally do not use a subsoiler to sow rape.
    We make do with what we have got.
    There data showed that there was very little yield difference between all establishment types, provided moisture was not lost
    Was at the same meeting. The guy is my agronomist. We achieved an average of 5.6t/ha last year over 72ha of Catana and Excalibur. The best was 10ha of Catana at 7t/ha dried weight.
    All of my rape was established with mintill simba solo with discs as shallow as possible, then either drilled with a combidrill and rolled all within 10 hours or other approach was stocks seeder on back of solo broadcasting the seed evenly across full width followed by double rolling.
    Land was very dry at the time and solo plus seeder approach got 20% higher seed rate than drilled. seed rates were around two thirds of standard.
    I believe drilling is slightly better and allows targeted rates. This year all drilled at 30seeds for Compass. Still looks too good.

    Some theory.
    If target rate is 25 seeds/m2 then ideal spacing leads to 5 rows per metre with 5 seeds down each row. 36 seeds/m2 is 6 rows per metre (16cm ish row spacing) with 6 plants per linear metre. If you use a subsoiler with 50 or 60cm leg spacing then plant spacing down the row ends up very high unless seed rates are ridiculously low. Therefore if seed spacing is the only single issue, the subsoiler seeder approach is wrong and a drill is better.

    However, we have other issues at play, moisture loss, fertiliser, slugs, herbicides, timeliness, etc.
    My take on it all is that whichever method you use, do it well. Conserve moisture where necessary by reducing passes or speeding up the time between first cultivation and final roll. Roll twice if very dry crossover first then down the run. Use low seed rates to achieve stronger plants in the winter. I don't need to worry about fertiliser placement as most rape land gets a dollop of pig slurry before cultivation.

    My only other "pearls of wisdom" are to leave the fert spreader in the shed for longer in the spring unless crops are backward.

  2. #32
    FarmerStan
    Guest

    Re: WOSR in rows

    Quote Originally Posted by Lee View Post
    Just wish I could find a similar formula for wheat
    Broadcast your wheat too!!

    Or next best thing - mount a hopper on a culivator and dribble the wheat on at the same time as cultivating!
    I want to build / make something to try this! Just don't seem to get round to it!

  3. #33
    Clive
    Guest

    Re: WOSR in rows

    Quote Originally Posted by FarmerStan View Post
    Broadcast your wheat too!!

    Or next best thing - mount a hopper on a culivator and dribble the wheat on at the same time as cultivating!
    I want to build / make something to try this! Just don't seem to get round to it!
    it has been tried on a big scale locally - same guy drills now so I guess it wasn't a great success ?

  4. #34
    Neddy Flanders
    Guest

    Re: WOSR in rows

    Quote Originally Posted by FarmerStan View Post
    Broadcast your wheat too!!

    Or next best thing - mount a hopper on a culivator and dribble the wheat on at the same time as cultivating!
    I want to build / make something to try this! Just don't seem to get round to it!
    Isn't that a Horsch drill? Won't they penetrate ?

  5. #35
    Mayo
    Guest

    Re: WOSR in rows

    Can understand the need for loosening at depth for osr given the nature of it's rooting habit. Perhaps this is why broadcast cereals are not so successful: need a depth of soil above the seed?

    Osr has always been one of those things in my simple mind that looks like a weed and seems to behave like one. It will grow in mud patch or a crack next to the weigh bridge but it will just as soon die in what you though was a perfect seedbed, I bet there isn't a man here who hasn't had it dish out a depressing surprise once or more.

    Another key chemical being banned will surely cause more environmental harm than good. The day they allow the use of crop tolerant to glufosinate ammonium cannot come soon enough. That would kick tue grass weed and charlock problem into touch!

  6. #36
    Panzer III
    Guest

    Re: WOSR in rows

    This is the bit that puzzles me as to why people can't see the fact the osr plant is a bush and the maximum canopy which is where the yield comes from is down spacing around it. Its just one of those things that makes total sense.
    It only makes 'total sense' if your not seeing the bigger picture - should 'ave gone to spec savers Lee

    OSR is aleopathic in nature - it exudes a chemical from its roots to kill off any near neighbours, so that only the stronger plants survive. If its too thick along a row, then it thins itself out by killing the weaker plants.

    If its too thick and randomly spaced - then you get a thick crop of 'pencil stemmed' biomass which does nothing but grow tall and slow down the combine while harvest a mediocre crop. All stem, no pod.

    Sowing in rows over a subsoiler leg creates a channel of moisture and mineralised N, as well as allowing the tap root to grow rapidly without impediment, and lets sunlight through to the lower branches at pod fill.

    We averaged 5.9t/Ha of Catana into store (over our weigh bridge) last year, using a Subdisc and seeding box (40 seeds M2), and a tickle of Autumn N.
    When we ploughed for rape, it was always miserable in more 'moist' parts of the farm, and never really recovered. The current system is a lot more uniform from hedge to hedge, and a certainly a damn site quicker and cheaper to boot.

  7. #37
    NB
    Guest

    Re: WOSR in rows

    Pulled some OSR plants up today. Those in the row behind the subsoiler leg were a lot harder to pull up and broke at about 8" with probably a 5-6" tap root. Plants between the main rows (unsubsoiled) were easier to pull up and the roots were only two thirds in length. I know which I prefer.

  8. #38
    Mayo
    Guest

    Re: WOSR in rows

    Quote Originally Posted by NB View Post
    Pulled some OSR plants up today. Those in the row behind the subsoiler leg were a lot harder to pull up and broke at about 8" with probably a 5-6" tap root. Plants between the main rows (unsubsoiled) were easier to pull up and the roots were only two thirds in length. I know which I prefer.
    Picture of that would have been good. Haven't you invested in a smartphone yet? :lolk:

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