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Thread: Weirs in a slatted tank?

  1. #1
    Filthy Rich
    Guest

    Weirs in a slatted tank?

    Advice please!

    I am in the long & slow process of thinking about installing a slatted tank under a new build to house 160 cows. The tank will be 38m x 28m x 2.44m with the intention to extract from one end only.

    Do I need to make a series of weirs front to back to aid slurry movement or can i get away with a flat floor? The slats will be on piers rather than using salom walls

    It is intended to house cows on robots so it is unlikely they will be going out much if at all. I am hopiing that i only have to empty once or twice a year keeping the slurry liquid via aeration or slurry bugs

  2. #2
    sprocket
    Guest

    Re: Weirs in a slatted tank?

    Quote Originally Posted by Filthy Rich View Post
    Advice please!

    I am in the long & slow process of thinking about installing a slatted tank under a new build to house 160 cows. The tank will be 38m x 28m x 2.44m with the intention to extract from one end only.

    Do I need to make a series of weirs front to back to aid slurry movement or can i get away with a flat floor? The slats will be on piers rather than using salom walls

    It is intended to house cows on robots so it is unlikely they will be going out much if at all. I am hopiing that i only have to empty once or twice a year keeping the slurry liquid via aeration or slurry bugs
    As long as you have good access for mixing at various locations, a flat floor should be OK
    What do you mean by piers?

  3. #3
    Filthy Rich
    Guest

    Re: Weirs in a slatted tank?

    Piers = Pillars

    I am hoping not to have to stir due to the risk of gases. Having a bit of a problem sourcing firms who make aeration systems though. Slurry bugs may be the alternative but you have to remember to keep adding them ...

  4. #4
    james d geoghegan
    Guest

    Re: Weirs in a slatted tank?

    Dairypower in Ireland fit air systems, dont build on piers, use walls instead , you will have to agitate at some point and it is impossible to agitate with piller tanks, as the lumps wont flow to the pump.

  5. #5
    cozzie
    Guest

    Re: Weirs in a slatted tank?

    Quote Originally Posted by james d geoghegan View Post
    Dairypower in Ireland fit air systems, dont build on piers, use walls instead , you will have to agitate at some point and it is impossible to agitate with piller tanks, as the lumps wont flow to the pump.
    I agree, I would use walls instead. On of the tanks I empty is about the length your talking about and its just a flat floor, all be it with some bit of a fall and a slurry box to stick the pipe into.

  6. #6
    sprocket
    Guest

    Re: Weirs in a slatted tank?

    Quote Originally Posted by james d geoghegan View Post
    Dairypower in Ireland fit air systems, dont build on piers, use walls instead , you will have to agitate at some point and it is impossible to agitate with piller tanks, as the lumps wont flow to the pump.
    Can you explain how walls are better. I have only seen pillars & works OK as long as plenty of access points for mixing

  7. #7
    Slurry Solutions
    Guest

    Re: Weirs in a slatted tank?

    Quote Originally Posted by Filthy Rich View Post
    Piers = Pillars

    I am hoping not to have to stir due to the risk of gases. Having a bit of a problem sourcing firms who make aeration systems though. Slurry bugs may be the alternative but you have to remember to keep adding them ...
    Thry these guys - very good product with a long track record. SPeak to Brian Mees, he will give you all the info. http://www.ameramslurry.com/index.php

    I would offer to do it for you but you are bit out of my area

    Cheers

    Rob

  8. #8
    Filthy Rich
    Guest

    Re: Weirs in a slatted tank?

    Quote Originally Posted by Slurry Solutions View Post
    Thry these guys - very good product with a long track record. SPeak to Brian Mees, he will give you all the info. http://www.ameramslurry.com/index.php

    I would offer to do it for you but you are bit out of my area

    Cheers

    Rob
    Thanks for that Rob.

    All this has now put doubt in my mind .. (easily done!) -

    Surely by aerating the slurry on a daily basis (or more frequently), there should be not need to stir when emptying as the slurry will remain in suspension and due to agitation will not settle or crust. True or false?

    The question of putting in weirs - if the slurry doesn't need stirring assuming that aeration does what i suggest above, then would weirs help to move the material down to the extraction point assuming that i only had one or two exits at the gable end of the shed? Or can i get away with a flat floor?

    At least I am not in a rush ....

  9. #9
    Agri Design
    Guest

    Re: Weirs in a slatted tank?

    For aeration systems the deeper the tank the better. Maybe an idea to go down to 3m. Also that size of tank is below 6 months storage, well depending on what figure you use for wash water.
    With the aeration system running every night, pillars and a flat floor will work well. Remember you need about 500mm slurry in the tank before the bubbler will be able to operate effectively.
    Make sure the ventilation is designed properly or the shed will really not be a pleasant place to be when the aeration system is on and for while afterwards.

    David Mair

  10. #10
    Filthy Rich
    Guest

    Re: Weirs in a slatted tank?

    Thanks for that David.
    Interesting photos.
    My intention is to be able to divert roof water into the tank on a needs basis using a diverter value on the downpipe sump with the idea to put at least 500mm in before the cows ever arrive.

    I have worked out that I have a theoritical capacity of 2596 cu m from which I need to deduct 300mm of freeboard (320 cu m) leaving 2276 cu m. With a total of 145 cows in at any one time, say producing 53 l/cow/day of slurry & urine then over 180 days = 1383 cu m leaving 893 cu m. Rainwater to start at 500mm = 532 leaves 361cu m for wash down so you are right that 6 mths is very tight but we are not (yet) in an NVZ and have free draining land that is generally accessible throughout the year if needs be although i can understand the idea of going an extra 2' deeper to create an air pocket.

    Ventilation is something I am very keen on and with a green field site, at least i have plenty of space to work in but I am struggling to work out which is the best way to orientate the building to get the best stack effect. We can suffer very strong winds on Anglesey although the site is set down & with good tree cover to at least two sides. Any suggestions welcome on this matter

  11. #11
    Agri Design
    Guest

    Re: Weirs in a slatted tank?

    Sorry I missed your reply.
    The pics are of a shed I designed before I started out for myself. It was a milbury aerator system.
    For the best advice I would need much more info, things like internal shed layout, site location, feeding system etc.

    But if for example you were feeding down the outside of the building on an exposed site it would be best to site the gable into the wind to try and protect the feed down the sides. A soil bund along the gable may help in this situation also by acting as a bit of a wind brake.

    I do ventilation calculations and advise of all aspects of building design, orientation, materials, planning applications etc. If you are interested send me more details or call and I can quote for what you are after.

    David Mair

  12. #12
    joe soapy
    Guest

    Re: Weirs in a slatted tank?

    If at all possible align roof so as to suitable for solar panels in future

  13. #13
    causeway cowboy
    Guest

    Re: Weirs in a slatted tank?

    We have a milbury bubbler system in our slurry store/tower. A total waste of time and money imo! 1st year it was in it crusted solid on top. They said it was because we were bedding with chopped straw even though they knew before fitting that was what we used. Next year it was cleaned out by them (well 6 polish boys and the sales rep with brush and shovel and a bucket to get it over the side!) We started using saw dust same thing happened apparently this time it was because she wasnt on long enough at night despite them having it set to run for 6hours. Following year same thing and in the end i put in slurry bugs to break it up. Good job.

    Now we never bother with bubbler we just fill away at store then when it gets near full or we for spreading we empty tanks in to it though the jetter and break the crust that way. Would put on bubbler for a night or two then to slow down the crusting over.

    I know this isnt the same as your tank but i would take in to consideration what your bedding cows with as well as everything else.


    If i was tanking i would be getting my self a really good slurry pump!


    Just my 2p's worth!

  14. #14
    oskosh
    Guest

    Re: Weirs in a slatted tank?

    We fitted an Ameram system in 2010 and it does all they say it does. Our only problem was not adding enough water when first using it. This year we diverted the water from the roof into the tank to start the process, and all looks well with the slurry being ready to spread at any time with no crust at all. We had our slurry anylised last year, for every 1000 gallons the contents were N 7.5 units, P 16 units and K 38 units, the SAC who did the tests said these results were higher than normal.

  15. #15
    TP
    Guest

    Re: Weirs in a slatted tank?

    We have a former lagoon that is now a decent sized house and tank built on many large piers and lintels similar to the one in the pictures above but witout any aeration,I mixed it the other day in 2 1/2 hours from 3 mixing points in the central passageway.Was done about 15 years ago,never had a problem mixing it yet.Moderm pumps and plenty of donkeys push slurry a long way with a lot of force.You want as open an area for mixing as possible in my experience,we have a tank with a central wall and it's very time consuming to mix as the water all pulls to the pump at the start leaving very hard areas at the furthest point that take ages to move.

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