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  1. #1
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    Compressor problem

    I have an old road compressor made by consolidated pneumatic for blowing off the combine. This morning I started it as normal but it seemed there was no drive to the actual compressor does anyone know what sort of coupling it would have to the engine, im thinking some sort of viscous coupling but can't see anywhere to top up the oil, or is some sort of slip clutch more likely?

  2. #2
    Senior Member T P's Avatar
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    Re: Compressor problem

    There's likely to be a large rubber "donut" cushion drive between the engine and compressor which can fail (it did in mine).Can be expensive from the machine maker /agent but should be available for a lot less from the likes of a bearing supplier so it's worthwhile measuring the old one and looking for part numbers on it, It'll probably be handier to remove the compressor from the engine rather than the engine from the compressor to check and repair. Shouldn't be a big job for a competent home mechanic There may well be an inspection plate on the bell housing that you could remove to see if that's what's gone. if there's no inspection plate a large hole might be drilled or cored to make one. If there is a rubber coupling it could look something like these or have 3 holes axially and three holes radially like the old DB or Leyland hydraulic pump couplings. They perish with age or oil contamination and running the compressor at basically an open hole flat out puts the full engine power through them and finishes them off.

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_f...pling&_sacat=0

    Unfortunately a lot of the older sizes are now obsolete and that then requires some modification to get around which then becomes an issue of whether it's cost effective on an old machine.This is the sort of design that was in mine though it was likely a different size:

    http://www.charnleys.com/part/leylan...lic-pump-drive

    Not a cheap bit of rubber, this design needs to be squeezed to get the holes to align, usually a couple of jubilee clips joined together around the ring then tightened does the trick as long as it's not minus five at the time. There are several other possible variations on a flex drive including splined nylon / hard rubber so you won't know for sure until you look inside.

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    Re: Compressor problem

    Thanks for the reply tp, I've got the compressor off and there were 3 sheared off studs in the flywheel and 3 larger worn holes in the drive plate, I rooted round where the machine has been stood and found a stud which I'm assuming should have a rubber sleeve in one side? I suppose the next step is to visit the local bearing supplier and see what they can source

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  5. #5
    Senior Member T P's Avatar
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    Re: Compressor problem

    From your photograph I would hazard a reasonable guess that it had this sort of thing originally:

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/DRIVE-Shaft-...-/171025210053

    This is just an example picture, it might have looked a bit different. Unfortunately there seems to be little rubber evidence left for parts retrieval. I think you bolted it onto one side with three screws and then as you pushed the halves together the three tapered bolts screwed into the other side slid into the other three holes. Once the rubber failed it ran on until all the studs sheared from the vibration due to lack of cushioning. More than a bit of extrapolation from what little evidence is left. First step would be to get the broken studs out and then see if they could be made up out of new bolts tapered on a grinder or such. You can tell a fair bit about what was in it by putting it together and looking through that inspection cover in case it was just an early crude three pins driving in three holes job. Does look as though you might not be the first "explorer" by the tabs on the flywheel bolts. At the end of the day three good quality bolts with nuts to support the base would get it running again, you could even drill out the broken ones rethread for a bigger size, even the opposite flange could have beefier holes drilled. Certainly an option if parts are dear. Could be handier to remove the flywheel to work at the broken studs, wonder was that why it was off before in bygone days?

  6. #6
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    Re: Compressor problem

    I think its that old and will be simpler than a doughnut coupling.

    IIRC they had something like a metalastic bush in each of 3 holes 120degrees apart and then there should of been 3 of those drive pins in the flywheel that simply pushed into the bushes in the airside flange

    bushes would be something like this possibly



    I'll see if I can get in touch with a couple of old school plant fitters who may know where to find vintage spares
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