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Thread: Pruning loppers

  1. #1
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    Pruning loppers

    I must be mad but rather than flail my hedges (approx 700m) I'm going to have a go at them by hand.

    Flailing leaves so much debris and I can't risk exposing visiting aircraft to punctures so I really have no option and although I've got a pair of ancient bypass loppers I was wondering if any of you had any advice regarding what are best pruning loppers available.

    Glad the forum albeit a new one is up and running again.

  2. #2
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    Re: Pruning loppers

    Spear and Jackson I would have thought.
    Can you not then side up with a pole saw ?

  3. #3
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    Re: Pruning loppers

    Like many products with familiar names from the past Spear and Jackson products are now made in China and are no longer manufactured to the high standards of a couple of decades ago. I have a friend who imports tens of thousands of garden tools from the ROC and most are branded with the names of the quality manufacturers we'd come to trust years ago, a bit like all the TV's flooding the market with household names from the past such as Grundig and Ferguson.

    My plan for the hedges is to cut back hard to about a metre and a half high and have a go at the side growth on what remains with my Stihl hedge trimmer.

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    Re: Pruning loppers

    Pole saw, hedgetrimmer and then bucket brush.

  5. #5
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    Re: Pruning loppers

    I do rather more hedge than that using a pole mounted reciprocating trimmer (i.e. brushcutter based). For what it's worth, mine is a Tanaka 230C, and it's very good, but others are probably just as good. The great thing about it is that the weight is taken by a shoulder strap most of the time, and I can cheerfully do well over a quarter of a mile in a couple of hours, and not end up knackered - unlike what I would be if I used a reciprocating trimmer with the engine mounted directly on the end of the blades.

    The other advantage of a pole mounted trimmer is that you'll be able to take the trimmer head off, and put a pole chainsaw head on, which is also a wonderful tool for dealing with overgrown hedges: much faster and easier than any hand loppers.

    I do have loppers as well, and they're cheap compound action Chinese made ones, with an anvil type head, and extendable tubular handles: they still get sold under various brand names. Not things of beauty, but I've been using mine for well over 20 years now, and they still work well on branches up to about an inch in diameter.

  6. #6
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    Re: Pruning loppers

    I've got a Stihl brushcutter which I have used on the growth around the base of the hedge but I found that the springy nature of the thin branches/twigs meant that the rotating blade really doesn't get enough resistance to cut the stuff!

  7. #7
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    Re: Pruning loppers

    Quote Originally Posted by rogcal View Post
    I've got a Stihl brushcutter which I have used on the growth around the base of the hedge but I found that the springy nature of the thin branches/twigs meant that the rotating blade really doesn't get enough resistance to cut the stuff!
    Get a reciprocating cutter head for it, or it that isn't easy for your model of Stihl, get hold of a Makita or Tanaka brushcutter complete with reciprocating head, and in both cases you can buy the pole chainsaw head fairly cheaply.

  8. #8
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    Re: Pruning loppers

    I was using a Stihl telescopic pole saw the other day, great for trimming branches up to about 8 inches thick but also pretty good at doing lighter stuff of around 1/2 inch takes a bit of handling when fully extend just less then 4 m Our
    local dealer was doing husky hedge cutter / pole saw /strimmer combo for just over 1000 inc vat , that i had a look at it but at but it was too short of reach for what I needed so just hired the Stihl
    Last edited by Big red; 17-02-13 at 02:27 PM. Reason: Grammer

  9. #9
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    Re: Pruning loppers

    Thanks for all the good advice, it's greatly appreciated. I do like the idea of the saw attachment and shall explore this option.

  10. #10
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    Re: Pruning loppers

    I have used these for about 10 years now for pruning trees gateway entrances etc. Very strong and make a cleaner cut than a pole saw. STANTON HOPE HIT FS 27 LOPPER - immensely strong, 38 mm. (1.5") capacity blades, 'slide shift' action to increase cutting power. try google or pruning world. priced About 50.

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