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Thread: Metal stitching

  1. #1
    Track Marshall
    Guest

    Metal stitching

    has anybody had a go at doing a metal stitching repair to a cracked engine block?
    There are people advertise that they can do the job but i want to have a go at it myself if you can just buy the parts to do it.

    looking at 'lock-n-stitch' http://www.jswl.co.uk/metal-stitching.htm

  2. #2
    Footsfitter
    Guest

    Re: Metal stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by Track Marshall View Post
    has anybody had a go at doing a metal stitching repair to a cracked engine block?
    There are people advertise that they can do the job but i want to have a go at it myself if you can just buy the parts to do it.

    looking at 'lock-n-stitch' http://www.jswl.co.uk/metal-stitching.htm

    A quick google on "Lock-N-Stitch" came up with http://www.locknstitch.com/ There looks to be a bit of info to read later

    Never tried it nor seen anything with it done.


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  3. #3
    Howburn
    Guest

    Re: Metal stitching

    There is a fairly good thread about it here
    http://www.mig-welding.co.uk/forum/s...=cylinder+head
    Also some good information on YouTube

  4. #4
    Track Marshall
    Guest

    Re: Metal stitching

    looks pretty straight forward

    [YOUTUBE]Pq0wfU4ZaKk[/YOUTUBE]

  5. #5
    oskosh
    Guest

    Re: Metal stitching

    My dad showed me to do it this way 30 years ago. I think the crack was on the side of an engine block, he showed me to drill a hole and tap it 3/16th, screw in a length of threaded brass rod and cut it off just above the surface, then peen the brass over. Drill another hole to overlap the brass and continue till crack is all sealed, this may not be the correct way but I remember it working well.

  6. #6
    defender
    Guest

    Re: Metal stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by oskosh View Post
    My dad showed me to do it this way 30 years ago. I think the crack was on the side of an engine block, he showed me to drill a hole and tap it 3/16th, screw in a length of threaded brass rod and cut it off just above the surface, then peen the brass over. Drill another hole to overlap the brass and continue till crack is all sealed, this may not be the correct way but I remember it working well.
    thats how I was taught as well but used mild steel rod ,It was called chain studding back then

  7. #7
    Footsfitter
    Guest

    Re: Metal stitching

    Had a look at some of the videos and info about the american system. To me it looks like their counterboring a recess in the top to allow the slight shoulder of the head of the stud gives plenty of meat when the jobs done to cap the repair off.

    The use of the spacing gauge to drill the line of holes must speed things up a lot and make for accurate spacings (assuming you get the 1st hole in the 2nd stage right!)

    One of the repairs pictured is of a D series cylinder head where the bottom of the head blows out below the thermostat, we bought in a irrigation pump with a welded repair to one, its not the best of jobs but still water tight, plus it's made me think about an upright caprari irrigation pump that got frosted a couple of years ago and would also be a candidate for stitching, the estimate for it to be cast welded was over 400


    ff


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  8. #8
    MrNoo
    Guest

    Re: Metal stitching

    Not done it myself but had a racing block done that spat a rod out, these chaps did it http://www.vintagecarrestorations.com/scemain1.htm
    Once done it was fine and lasted another season at 9,000rmp and was still running fine when I sold it.

  9. #9
    TP
    Guest

    Re: Metal stitching

    Don't really see it as much of a job,surely milling the crack out and welding it then resurfacing would be a far superior and probably quicker job?

  10. #10
    oskosh
    Guest

    Re: Metal stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by defender View Post
    thats how I was taught as well but used mild steel rod ,It was called chain studding back then
    We used brass rod because it expanded quicker than the cast, well thats what dad told me.

  11. #11
    Track Marshall
    Guest

    Re: Metal stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by TP View Post
    Don't really see it as much of a job,surely milling the crack out and welding it then resurfacing would be a far superior and probably quicker job?
    i was of the opinion that to do a decent job of welding cast iron the item to be welded should be pre heated before being welded. this would make a hell of a job out of it, especially on a block or something else large that had to make it a specialist job.

    the stitching idea looks like it would get over the heating problem, plus it could be done 'in situ' saving alot of aggro and cost

    although i could well be wrong

  12. #12
    defender
    Guest

    Re: Metal stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by oskosh View Post
    We used brass rod because it expanded quicker than the cast, well thats what dad told me.
    that could be right but we couldnt afford brass rod

  13. #13
    lamplighter2
    Guest

    Re: Metal stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by Track Marshall View Post
    i was of the opinion that to do a decent job of welding cast iron the item to be welded should be pre heated before being welded. this would make a hell of a job out of it, especially on a block or something else large that had to make it a specialist job.

    the stitching idea looks like it would get over the heating problem, plus it could be done 'in situ' saving alot of aggro and cost

    although i could well be wrong
    if you can find a good tig welder then should be ok had a cast exaust manifold welded this way never broke again. the guy who did it for me built racing cars. so was good at his job. have a look for someone small who does this sort of thing on racing cars a lot of club racers on a budget

  14. #14
    TP
    Guest

    Re: Metal stitching

    Well suppose you're taking your seat on an airbus,you know the ones with a rake of cracks in the wings.Now having watched the video would you prefer the captain to announce that he got the cracks welded or metal stitched?

  15. #15
    snowcat
    Guest

    Re: Metal stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by Track Marshall View Post
    i was of the opinion that to do a decent job of welding cast iron the item to be welded should be pre heated before being welded. this would make a hell of a job out of it, especially on a block or something else large that had to make it a specialist job.

    the stitching idea looks like it would get over the heating problem, plus it could be done 'in situ' saving alot of aggro and cost

    although i could well be wrong
    Welding Cast is very Hit and miss, It doesnt matter how much of a jouneyman you are sometimes its just not possible, I recently had a Grey cast sump from an Ag dealer (A bit more here), I attempted it a multitude of ways, and even with all the plant available to me I had to admit defeat, the sump would crack at any temperature above 150C.
    Pre heat on Grey Cast shouldn't be used, as its often not possible to keep the steady 500C on the whole area that is necessary to be effective,

    Stitching does work very well, a skilled art, but a more reliable one than welding which is a complete unknown.

  16. #16
    chris696
    Guest

    Re: Metal stitching

    I had a company in to "stitch" a crack in the water jacket of a sulzer compressor.
    The repair method was like here http://www.r-f.com/metal_stitch_repair.asp with locks across the crack and laces along the length. Never had any problems afterwards.
    Can not remember how much, it was a lot cheaper than a new block though!

  17. #17
    JohnB_IE
    Guest

    Re: Metal stitching

    I would have to agree with snowcat,i regularly attempt repairing castings including aluminium ones .Its heartbreaking work at times.

  18. #18
    joe soapy
    Guest

    Re: Metal stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnB_IE View Post
    I would have to agree with snowcat,i regularly attempt repairing castings including aluminium ones .Its heartbreaking work at times.
    with aluminium, have often read accounts on metal casting forums of making a mould, then simply recasting the broken part.. there is also a low temperature solder like rod they use for repairs

  19. #19
    TP
    Guest

    Re: Metal stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by joe soapy View Post
    with aluminium, have often read accounts on metal casting forums of making a mould, then simply recasting the broken part.. there is also a low temperature solder like rod they use for repairs
    On the rare occasions I try to weld anything cast the low temp rod is what I use and it works well.Economical and easy to use for small jobs or an occasional user.Too dear for major fabrication but then you'd have a mig or tig for that.I use durafix rods but I'm sure there are other brands_works a treat.

    http://durafix.com/

    http://durafix.co.uk/pages.php?&pID=6

  20. #20
    Track Marshall
    Guest

    Re: Metal stitching

    just to update this a little i have had a quote from the European distributors for lock-n-stitch.

    he sent me this catalogue http://www.locknstitch.com/FT%20pdf%...Cat%202007.pdf

    so,

    C2FSK (page 22) is 570
    C2FA-100 (page 11) is 87
    and the power tapper on page 39 is 822

    this is all plus postage from the US and plus VAT

  21. #21
    MickMoor
    Guest

    Re: Metal stitching

    At the Vintage Sports Car Club race meeting, had a chat with Nick Hood from Surelock, www.castingrepairs.com He said they had even done tens of thousands of blocks for York diesel engines, to Ford approval. He can help I'm sure, although he does specialise in vintage and classic cars now. He's in Rutland, but is not confined to the workshop, and will carry out the job for less than the price of equipment quoted. He has repaired the block of ERA R2B Romulus, not a job for the ham fisted!

  22. #22
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    1

    Re: Metal stitching

    I have been a metal stitched for some 40 years. Its not quite as easy as you think.
    I still have all the tooling and would be willing to repair any cast iron that you have damaged.
    Even if there is iron missing.
    Mel

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