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Thread: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

  1. #1
    Senior Member Footsfitter's Avatar
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    Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Back when most of my schoolmates were chasing skirt, I was occupied with anything mechanical and followed a series in the popular magazine Car Mechanics, called "Trick of the Trade" it was written by a chap called Barry Cade who recalled bits and pieces of interest from the small garage workshop he ran. I followed it for years, using many of them still to this day.

    So it seems a logical thing to have in a Workshop board, I'll start off, but if anyone else has any practical tips, please add them.



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    Senior Member Footsfitter's Avatar
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Only picked this tip up back last year while in the engine machine shop I use, a lad was drilling out a broken stud on an engine and had to get the oversize replacement exactly parallel to others.






    Here is the new Mag drill on its first outing, had it some time but not christened it yet!. The washers are two flame cut rings Parker Steel did for me, around 65kg each, they will be bolted to the rear rim of the back wheels on our MF6499 we acquired last summer so that we can use them as adaptors to go from 4 bolts in the rim to the 3 bolt fixings used in a set of 12 49kg ex TW20 wheel weights we still have.

    I looked into a reasonable set of used Agco weights but they came without the big starter ring so the whole job started to add up. Plan B was to get these rings cut, (IIRC approx 160)

    Picture 1 is drilling out the pilot hole for the first of the four 3/4"unc holes for the rim, once drilled and without moving the mag drill I have put the tail centre out of our lathe in the drill taper socket so I can put the taper tap in the pilot hole to start it off with a spanner while just applying light pressure to keep the pilot in the countersunk centre hole in the end of the taps shank.

    After about 1 to 1-1/2 turns, off comes the mag drill and then on with the proper tap wrench. The end result is a thread dead in line with the pilot hole drilled for it.


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    Senior Member Bumble Bee's Avatar
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Just changed the taper roller king pin bearings on the Multidrive axles.
    I asked a local mechanic "what was the best way to get the outer bearing casing out of the axle".
    He said too run some weld round the inside of the casing, let it cool, then it would drop out. Sure enough it did.

    In the past I have spent hours trying to get bearing casings out. I think I owe him a few beers

  4. #4
    Senior Member Ray's Avatar
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Bumble Bee View Post
    Just changed the taper roller king pin bearings on the Multidrive axles.
    I asked a local mechanic "what was the best way to get the outer bearing casing out of the axle".
    He said too run some weld round the inside of the casing, let it cool, then it would drop out. Sure enough it did.

    In the past I have spent hours trying to get bearing casings out. I think I owe him a few beers
    The same technique is good for removing worn bushes, stub axle, king pin etc, only I knock them out while still hot...

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    When changeling pto bearings after taking out the circlips for the bearing caps if you hold shaft dangling the yoke down in one hand and crack the yokes with a hammer with the other the caps walk out with out a lot easyer than you would think with each hammer blow

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    A good tip for getting those small grub screws back in without them dropping out is to get a matchstick and bite the end.

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Hey FF

    I remember the Barry Cade articles very well, used to look forward to reading it every month!!, what does that say about us ??

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    When using a hammer and it is sliding off the top of a punch or nail or chisel .Dry the face of the hammer with a cloth or on your sleeve and it will work a lot better . The man that showed me that trick is long gone but everytime a hammer skids off the top of a chisel he is remembered .

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    Senior Member Footsfitter's Avatar
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Quote Originally Posted by CYRUSH View Post
    Hey FF

    I remember the Barry Cade articles very well, used to look forward to reading it every month!!, what does that say about us ??
    Probably that we would understand syncromesh on only 2 of a 4 speed gear box and the art of double de-clutching !!

    rgds

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    When fitting tubeless tyres ,if you cannot get the tyre to seal on the bead.use a ratchet strap around the circumference of the tyre,ratchet it up to spread the tyre,partially inflate and then remove the strap

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    One tip from the old site that I always remember. I think it was Footsfitter who posted it; to remove a stubborn small pin using a thin drift that can bend, start it moving with a heavier conventional punch, only using the parallel drift to finally knock the pin through. Saves a lot of bent drifts.

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Bumble Bee years ago I saw someone get a bearing casing out with an arc welder After shooting on day I saw a very talented but extremely frustrated estate fitter trying to get a large outer casing off a muck spreader I suggested he ran a bead about 300 amps around much easier than trying to get a drift to hold he did it a few minutes later it went ping a fell out He very nearly lost it & never spoke to me again !!

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Bog Man View Post
    When using a hammer and it is sliding off the top of a punch or nail or chisel .Dry the face of the hammer with a cloth or on your sleeve and it will work a lot better . The man that showed me that trick is long gone but everytime a hammer skids off the top of a chisel he is remembered .
    Or scrub it on a bit of concrete or coarse glass paper...

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    hammer thing .. fenceing contractor puts the face of the hammer on the coarse side of a shearing grinder so face of the hammer ends up flat vers a slight bow in it

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    JD-Kid That sounds good to me I'll certainly give that a try Xlandman

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    My favourite is the old speaker chucked in the suds tank of the bandsaw to keep the swarf out of the pump.

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    Senior Member Footsfitter's Avatar
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Quote Originally Posted by moffett View Post
    My favourite is the old speaker chucked in the suds tank of the bandsaw to keep the swarf out of the pump.
    Must be a Sub-Woofer then??


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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Footsfitter View Post
    Must be a Sub-Woofer then??


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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    This isn't strictly a trick of the trade, but could save someone from a lot of unexpected hassle. I had a small pile of bits of used kitchen roll on a workbench a couple of weeks ago, and looking at them in the sunshine, they appeared to be steaming.
    The steam got thicker, and I went and had a closer look, at which point flames appeared, and I chucked the lot outside. Now those kitchen roll squares had been used only to wipe oil used for drilling, plus bits of swarf and mill scale off some black mild steel.

    I think the powdered mill scale must have acted as a catalyst for the oil, but I'm guessing. All I really know is some oily, dirty, kitchen roll caught fire spontaneously, and if I hadn't been there might have caused serious damage. Something to avoid.

  20. #20
    Senior Member ACE's Avatar
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Quote Originally Posted by moffett View Post
    My favourite is the old speaker chucked in the suds tank of the bandsaw to keep the swarf out of the pump.
    similar thing i do! only i chuck them in the bottom of hydraulic tanks of machines ie telehandlers in my case amazing what you can find on them.

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    If you get get called to a breakdown and the first thing the operator says is "it's got plenty of diesel "...check and bleed fuel system.

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    Senior Member wr.'s Avatar
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Quote Originally Posted by RGSP View Post
    This isn't strictly a trick of the trade, but could save someone from a lot of unexpected hassle. I had a small pile of bits of used kitchen roll on a workbench a couple of weeks ago, and looking at them in the sunshine, they appeared to be steaming.
    The steam got thicker, and I went and had a closer look, at which point flames appeared, and I chucked the lot outside. Now those kitchen roll squares had been used only to wipe oil used for drilling, plus bits of swarf and mill scale off some black mild steel.

    I think the powdered mill scale must have acted as a catalyst for the oil, but I'm guessing. All I really know is some oily, dirty, kitchen roll caught fire spontaneously, and if I hadn't been there might have caused serious damage. Something to avoid.
    That's a tip for Ray Mears who normally starts a fire in a rain forest by rubbing two uncooked sausages together.

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Quote Originally Posted by moffett View Post
    My favourite is the old speaker chucked in the suds tank of the bandsaw to keep the swarf out of the pump.
    Good one!

    I'll do that!

    JV

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    dare I say subscribe too practical farm ideas mag. always some good tips in there.

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Ray View Post
    The same technique is good for removing worn bushes, stub axle, king pin etc, only I knock them out while still hot...
    +1

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    +1

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Quote Originally Posted by plant hauler View Post
    If you get get called to a breakdown and the first thing the operator says is "it's got plenty of diesel "...check and bleed fuel system.
    That reminds me of something my father once told me. He used to sell a lot of new motor bikes and said how many young kids come in with there irate parents saying there new little two-strokes had nipped up. The oil resevoir was usually full to the brim. He said he used to take great satisfaction in taking the pipe from the carb showing no oil!!

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Quote Originally Posted by RGSP View Post
    This isn't strictly a trick of the trade, but could save someone from a lot of unexpected hassle. I had a small pile of bits of used kitchen roll on a workbench a couple of weeks ago, and looking at them in the sunshine, they appeared to be steaming.
    The steam got thicker, and I went and had a closer look, at which point flames appeared, and I chucked the lot outside. Now those kitchen roll squares had been used only to wipe oil used for drilling, plus bits of swarf and mill scale off some black mild steel.

    I think the powdered mill scale must have acted as a catalyst for the oil, but I'm guessing. All I really know is some oily, dirty, kitchen roll caught fire spontaneously, and if I hadn't been there might have caused serious damage. Something to avoid.
    Would be useful tip for an arsonist!

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    The kitchen roll thing above reminds me of something i got told once, stuff like thinners, specifically celulose when sat on a cotton rag will possibly ignite spontaneously if left crumpled in a ball, seen it set a few workshop bins on fire! I always flat the rag out and leave over a metal bar or similar so it can air and the thinners evaporate easily.

    Dan

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Quote Originally Posted by plant hauler View Post
    When fitting tubeless tyres ,if you cannot get the tyre to seal on the bead.use a ratchet strap around the circumference of the tyre,ratchet it up to spread the tyre,partially inflate and then remove the strap
    If that fails pallet rap or silage rap stuffed in the gap works better than u would think

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