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  1. #1
    Senior Member Footsfitter's Avatar
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    Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Back when most of my schoolmates were chasing skirt, I was occupied with anything mechanical and followed a series in the popular magazine Car Mechanics, called "Trick of the Trade" it was written by a chap called Barry Cade who recalled bits and pieces of interest from the small garage workshop he ran. I followed it for years, using many of them still to this day.

    So it seems a logical thing to have in a Workshop board, I'll start off, but if anyone else has any practical tips, please add them.



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    Senior Member Footsfitter's Avatar
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Only picked this tip up back last year while in the engine machine shop I use, a lad was drilling out a broken stud on an engine and had to get the oversize replacement exactly parallel to others.






    Here is the new Mag drill on its first outing, had it some time but not christened it yet!. The washers are two flame cut rings Parker Steel did for me, around 65kg each, they will be bolted to the rear rim of the back wheels on our MF6499 we acquired last summer so that we can use them as adaptors to go from 4 bolts in the rim to the 3 bolt fixings used in a set of 12 49kg ex TW20 wheel weights we still have.

    I looked into a reasonable set of used Agco weights but they came without the big starter ring so the whole job started to add up. Plan B was to get these rings cut, (IIRC approx 160)

    Picture 1 is drilling out the pilot hole for the first of the four 3/4"unc holes for the rim, once drilled and without moving the mag drill I have put the tail centre out of our lathe in the drill taper socket so I can put the taper tap in the pilot hole to start it off with a spanner while just applying light pressure to keep the pilot in the countersunk centre hole in the end of the taps shank.

    After about 1 to 1-1/2 turns, off comes the mag drill and then on with the proper tap wrench. The end result is a thread dead in line with the pilot hole drilled for it.


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    Last edited by Footsfitter; 20-02-13 at 11:00 PM. Reason: Wrong image links
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    Senior Member Bumble Bee's Avatar
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Just changed the taper roller king pin bearings on the Multidrive axles.
    I asked a local mechanic "what was the best way to get the outer bearing casing out of the axle".
    He said too run some weld round the inside of the casing, let it cool, then it would drop out. Sure enough it did.

    In the past I have spent hours trying to get bearing casings out. I think I owe him a few beers

  4. #4
    Senior Member Ray's Avatar
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Bumble Bee View Post
    Just changed the taper roller king pin bearings on the Multidrive axles.
    I asked a local mechanic "what was the best way to get the outer bearing casing out of the axle".
    He said too run some weld round the inside of the casing, let it cool, then it would drop out. Sure enough it did.

    In the past I have spent hours trying to get bearing casings out. I think I owe him a few beers
    The same technique is good for removing worn bushes, stub axle, king pin etc, only I knock them out while still hot...

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Ray View Post
    The same technique is good for removing worn bushes, stub axle, king pin etc, only I knock them out while still hot...
    +1

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    When changeling pto bearings after taking out the circlips for the bearing caps if you hold shaft dangling the yoke down in one hand and crack the yokes with a hammer with the other the caps walk out with out a lot easyer than you would think with each hammer blow

  7. #7
    Senior Member happy hillbily's Avatar
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Il be the first to admit I have an untidy workshop
    After many years of losing small parts when dissasembling things, I now use a square lick bucket and dissasemble the parts inside the bucket, if anything falls out it should be in the bucket and not on the floor !

  8. #8
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Bin all those bits of workshop paper and rags that have been used to wipe oil / grease etc off things.
    Grinder sparks can find them from the other end of the workshop.
    Smoulder smoulder....wait till you have gone........smoulder fire.
    gee

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Gee View Post
    Bin all those bits of workshop paper and rags that have been used to wipe oil / grease etc off things.
    Grinder sparks can find them from the other end of the workshop.
    Smoulder smoulder....wait till you have gone........smoulder fire.
    gee
    Big fire in Devon last week caused just as you describe. Nobody badly hurt but four buildings, machinery and one poor dog were lost.

    Our Farm Ideas tip of having filled household sprays (bath/shower cleaner etc) around on the work bench. But you have to see - smell the smoke. Better to shield the sparks with moveable panels which are between the grinder and the pile of oily rags.
    Bright ideas for successful farming www.farmideas.co.uk

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    Senior Member Footsfitter's Avatar
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread - another use for a roll pin!

    Well thats harvest 99% done...................just last field to do tomorrow with a demo tracked axial-flow

    Been back in the workshop yesterday and today, picking up from where we left everything plus a few new items in the "queue". Still on the bench stripped down was a year old lishman 3phase grain column fan that "fell over". The housing being alloy was badly bent with what looked like marks where the tyre of what ever made it fall over squished it into the concrete!



    Having pulled the fan off and pressed the alloy plates flat again, squared up the side plate and the wonky fan I wanted to clean up the shaft and fan boss. The shaft was easy with a bit of emery tape but the 20mm fan boss was smaller than any of the flapwheels I had, (behind the bench grinder/wire wheel is a parts bin full with various wire cup brushes and flap wheels I buy as special offers and use them for polishing/cleaning during repairs and overhauls) so I looked on the bench shelf for a short round bar with a slot cut in the end, when mounted in an electric or air drill with a length of emery tape in the slot it makes short work of cleaning out small holes.

    Being unable to lay my hands on it, I double checked in the parts bin where I came a cross a 10mm roll pin and realised that it could be pressed into service. Placing it in the drill chuck and then rolling a little of the end of the emery tape so that it would slot into the roll pin forming an anchor to hold the strip in place, then wrap the tail round the outside of the pin. Very impressed how well it worked, never thought of using a roll pin for that before!





    ff

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    A good tip for getting those small grub screws back in without them dropping out is to get a matchstick and bite the end.

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Hey FF

    I remember the Barry Cade articles very well, used to look forward to reading it every month!!, what does that say about us ??

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    When using a hammer and it is sliding off the top of a punch or nail or chisel .Dry the face of the hammer with a cloth or on your sleeve and it will work a lot better . The man that showed me that trick is long gone but everytime a hammer skids off the top of a chisel he is remembered .

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Bog Man View Post
    When using a hammer and it is sliding off the top of a punch or nail or chisel .Dry the face of the hammer with a cloth or on your sleeve and it will work a lot better . The man that showed me that trick is long gone but everytime a hammer skids off the top of a chisel he is remembered .
    Or scrub it on a bit of concrete or coarse glass paper...

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Bog Man View Post
    When using a hammer and it is sliding off the top of a punch or nail or chisel .Dry the face of the hammer with a cloth or on your sleeve and it will work a lot better . The man that showed me that trick is long gone but everytime a hammer skids off the top of a chisel he is remembered .
    Now this a tip that has saved me many a black thumb!!!

  16. #16
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Quote Originally Posted by CYRUSH View Post
    Hey FF

    I remember the Barry Cade articles very well, used to look forward to reading it every month!!, what does that say about us ??
    Probably that we would understand syncromesh on only 2 of a 4 speed gear box and the art of double de-clutching !!

    rgds

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    When fitting tubeless tyres ,if you cannot get the tyre to seal on the bead.use a ratchet strap around the circumference of the tyre,ratchet it up to spread the tyre,partially inflate and then remove the strap

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Quote Originally Posted by plant hauler View Post
    When fitting tubeless tyres ,if you cannot get the tyre to seal on the bead.use a ratchet strap around the circumference of the tyre,ratchet it up to spread the tyre,partially inflate and then remove the strap
    If that fails pallet rap or silage rap stuffed in the gap works better than u would think

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Best to chase skirt every chance given, no regrets

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    Senior Member Footsfitter's Avatar
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    Cool Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread- Drill sharpening

    With a bit of practice and a aid or two its not difficult to sharpen HHS twist drills.


    To help get the angle right, mark the grinding wheel rest with a hacksaw cut. 118degrees is the "normal" mild steel point angle so this mark is 59degrees












    Now you can use the line to easily keep on angle. Use a grinding wheel dressing tool to get a nice straight face to the grindstone











    Here you can see that the rest is angled to make the drill bit sit pointing uphill. This needs to be 2-3 degrees.












    Now as you start to grind the first face take a fine amount off and straight away lift the drill point up so that the land on the bits face is ground back at an angle










    Heres the before, some hard cutting has taken the corner of the cutting edge








    Here is the same bit sharpened up












    What you need to do now is to look at the bit end on and figure out if both cutting edges are the same length. Keep shaving a wee amount off the face with the shortest cutting edge. You need to get them both the same length to cut evenly









    Job done



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    Senior Member ACE's Avatar
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread- Drill sharpening

    Quote Originally Posted by Footsfitter View Post
    With a bit of practice and a aid or two its not difficult to sharpen HHS twist drills.


    To help get the angle right, mark the grinding wheel rest with a hacksaw cut. 118degrees is the "normal" mild steel point angle so this mark is 59degrees












    Now you can use the line to easily keep on angle. Use a grinding wheel dressing tool to get a nice straight face to the grindstone











    Here you can see that the rest is angled to make the drill bit sit pointing uphill. This needs to be 2-3 degrees.












    Now as you start to grind the first face take a fine amount off and straight away lift the drill point up so that the land on the bits face is ground back at an angle










    Heres the before, some hard cutting has taken the corner of the cutting edge








    Here is the same bit sharpened up












    What you need to do now is to look at the bit end on and figure out if both cutting edges are the same length. Keep shaving a wee amount off the face with the shortest cutting edge. You need to get them both the same length to cut evenly









    Job done



    ff
    Nice one FF! want to do mine! got no end blunt at the moment. I bought a drill doctor 350x a fair while ago not cheap but is quite good most of the time! sometimes have trouble getting enough angle on it for the back edge to clear leaving the cutting edge to bite in, often when that happens its easier to finish off on the bench grinder.

    i dont have the knack to do the smaller bits but can do the bigger bits on the grinder after a bit of practice.

    I keep meaning to order the attachment for the drill doctor that will let me do left hand drill bits as that would be a big help.

  22. #22
    Senior Member Footsfitter's Avatar
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread- Hammer Handles

    One of the first things I learnt as an apprentice was how to replace broken hammer handles, still something that I do today even with the advent of swish fibreglass ones, making a good job of fitting an ash handle is still enjoyable.




    Two handles to fit here. The old shaft has been removed from the 14lb sledgehammer handle. Cut a slot in the end of the new shaft, then using a sanding disc, thin down the shaft if needed so its near the head size, but not too much. Place the head on the floor and just tap the shaft in enough so you can pick the head up with the shaft, now holding it off the floor, strike the shaft and drive it down into the head, the shaft will drive into the head with each blow, the shaft magically flies into the head, with this handle drive it up to the shoulder. If there is excess sticking out, cut off just proud.











    Next, using the old handle, cut out a wedge, drive this into the slot you cut earlier, if as here there is a gap just drive another small wedge in until filled. Cut the wedge off level. Using two steel wedges, drive them into the shaft across the wooden wedge and inline with the grain if possible. Now sand down the excess level with the head









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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    A wise engeneer told me when you have a tappered allen key bolt rounding off in the hole to get a punsh and flatten the head back down and try again 9 out of 10 times it works for me

  24. #24
    Senior Member Footsfitter's Avatar
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread- Magic!!

    Had to stock up on cable ties for the van & thought this might appeal to one or two













    Take one partitioned storage box, and place your cable ties in the available partitions- I put them so they are grouped by their width.













    When you want some, first stand box on its end

















    Then lay it down, open up and there they are sorted by length- Magic!











    Got fed up with plastic bags of various ties and this fits nicely under the compressor in a hidy hole

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Not sure if this qualifies as a genuine trick of the trade - but it worked for me.

    With the local auto electrician closed for the silly season, and a tractor (MF148) with a starter motor which wouldn't coz the brushes were almost to the wires, I dug out an old one (Lucas M45G) with good brushes, (ex MF168) intending to swap the end plate and body onto the remains of the 148 starter (not possible to swap the whole starter coz they fit opposite sides of the engine).

    The usual problem arose: getting the brushes onto the armature.

    I bolted the body of the starter to the cast-off rim off a 135 to allow gravity to hold parts of the starter in a favourable and stable position & threaded pieces of builder's line through the brush wires. Carefully pulling on each line in turn pulled the brushes over the armature, allowed the end plate to seat correctly.

    I also swapped the solenoid contacts around, as well as flipping over the bridging plate, although none were particularly bad.

    Starter works as normal, auto electrician misses out on a couple of hundred dollars and I give myself an Xmas present.

    JV
    Agtronix - the home of the Weedswiper

  26. #26
    Senior Member Footsfitter's Avatar
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Got the combine in the workshop for some warranty jobs and a service. One of the jobs we wanted to do was to put the rear wheels in a tad. Our last one had the back wheels slightly narrower - this one has the outside width of front and rear the same which makes the rears clash with the kerbs and traffic calming islands through one village.

    To make it easier to drag the loosened off wheel & outer axle I used an old trick I learnt of back in the 80's when we had tandem axle trailers converted to triaxles locally, I had taken one to be tested and re-plated which failed on a brake issue, I took it back to the converters where one of their fitters removed the pair of twin wheels c/w hub & brake drum in their carpark using two thin steel sheets and a blob of grease!





    Using the same principle the sheets and grease made it easier to pull each side in
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    I put a 45'x20' mobile home together using the same trick only with plywood. The delivery driver gave me the tip. Each side weighed about 7 tonnes but two of us slid it together without any great effort. Same driver told me he had got out of all sorts of tight spots with his artic using the same method. A small tractor is needed to move a lorry but about 150hp less than just trying to drag it.

  28. #28
    Senior Member Dexta man's Avatar
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Sorry if this has been mentioned by someone before but learned this the other day turns out if you have this type of grinder wire brush and its worn its actuall only about half worn , get a screwdriver or punch,etc and the suport band comes off revealing quite a bit more
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    One tip from the old site that I always remember. I think it was Footsfitter who posted it; to remove a stubborn small pin using a thin drift that can bend, start it moving with a heavier conventional punch, only using the parallel drift to finally knock the pin through. Saves a lot of bent drifts.

  30. #30
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Bumble Bee years ago I saw someone get a bearing casing out with an arc welder After shooting on day I saw a very talented but extremely frustrated estate fitter trying to get a large outer casing off a muck spreader I suggested he ran a bead about 300 amps around much easier than trying to get a drift to hold he did it a few minutes later it went ping a fell out He very nearly lost it & never spoke to me again !!

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