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Thread: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

  1. #181
    Senior Member Footsfitter's Avatar
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Haven't used this trick for a long time, but it always helps. Had to remove some 1" bsp nipples to reseal where diesel was weeping out. They were going to be tight, I didn't have any more and it was at the weekend so they had to come out and go back in. I have a pair of vice grips with very curved jaws which are better at spreading the pressure a bit more evenly, but usually when they are tight the high grip pressure deforms the nipple into an oval shape which often increases the grip between the threads making the stick even more.

    To help overcome this I usually find the best fitting socket to slip in the nipple to support it as you grip it- usually as this one did the socket is a slip fit and as you apply pressure it become tight which stops the crush effect and then your away.

    In this case the grips just made some teeth marks but there was no slipping & scalping of the thread so the few marks were simply polished with a fine 1/2 round file. They went back together with some of the thicker gas type PTFE tape- 2-3 wraps stopped their weeping.

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  2. #182
    Senior Member Footsfitter's Avatar
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Came up with a new "trick" today.

    Someone brought in an, IIRC 235/35R18 car wheel with a sliced sidewall and a replacement casing to go on the rim, breaking the beads was easy with the tyre machine but 17" rims are the biggest that will fit using the 4 hook clamps- using the other option of clamping it on the inside of the rim like steel rims was a no-no! so with plenty of tyre grease we thought we'd see if it would be possible to use one of these rim protectors doing it manually with just levers-



    That worked ok getting a narrow 1" lever in and getting the bead started, but after the second lever we were stuck needing a second protector................... so after a bit of hunting around I came up with trying the webbing from a ratchet load strap- having cut several 8" strips off an old strap I placed one in between the rim and bead, inserted the 1" lever and levered the next bit of bead over, moving on with another strip- same again and returning to the first bit of webbing, there was still enough hanging out to pull on and extract it ready to use in again in a fresh bite. The webbing worked well- not a mark on the alloy and it slid with the tyre lever nice and easily! Used it again to fit the replacement tyre in the same fashion, inflated and then on to the balancing machine

    Saved the webbing strips up in the bins with all the other tyre bits & bobs.
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  3. #183
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Hi
    Just been reading this thread, thanks to all for some great ideas.
    Many of the ideas have a magnet as part of the solution: if you want a good source of very powerful magnets then take apart some old computer hard disks you will find some excellent magnets inside.
    Oh and make sure its a disk you dont need, because it does not matter how well you put it back together it will never work again

  4. #184
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Not sure if this qualifies as a genuine trick of the trade - but it worked for me.

    With the local auto electrician closed for the silly season, and a tractor (MF148) with a starter motor which wouldn't coz the brushes were almost to the wires, I dug out an old one (Lucas M45G) with good brushes, (ex MF168) intending to swap the end plate and body onto the remains of the 148 starter (not possible to swap the whole starter coz they fit opposite sides of the engine).

    The usual problem arose: getting the brushes onto the armature.

    I bolted the body of the starter to the cast-off rim off a 135 to allow gravity to hold parts of the starter in a favourable and stable position & threaded pieces of builder's line through the brush wires. Carefully pulling on each line in turn pulled the brushes over the armature, allowed the end plate to seat correctly.

    I also swapped the solenoid contacts around, as well as flipping over the bridging plate, although none were particularly bad.

    Starter works as normal, auto electrician misses out on a couple of hundred dollars and I give myself an Xmas present.

    JV
    Agtronix - the home of the Weedswiper

  5. #185
    Senior Member Footsfitter's Avatar
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Got the combine in the workshop for some warranty jobs and a service. One of the jobs we wanted to do was to put the rear wheels in a tad. Our last one had the back wheels slightly narrower - this one has the outside width of front and rear the same which makes the rears clash with the kerbs and traffic calming islands through one village.

    To make it easier to drag the loosened off wheel & outer axle I used an old trick I learnt of back in the 80's when we had tandem axle trailers converted to triaxles locally, I had taken one to be tested and re-plated which failed on a brake issue, I took it back to the converters where one of their fitters removed the pair of twin wheels c/w hub & brake drum in their carpark using two thin steel sheets and a blob of grease!





    Using the same principle the sheets and grease made it easier to pull each side in
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  6. #186
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    I put a 45'x20' mobile home together using the same trick only with plywood. The delivery driver gave me the tip. Each side weighed about 7 tonnes but two of us slid it together without any great effort. Same driver told me he had got out of all sorts of tight spots with his artic using the same method. A small tractor is needed to move a lorry but about 150hp less than just trying to drag it.

  7. #187
    Senior Member Dexta man's Avatar
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Sorry if this has been mentioned by someone before but learned this the other day turns out if you have this type of grinder wire brush and its worn its actuall only about half worn , get a screwdriver or punch,etc and the suport band comes off revealing quite a bit more
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    All my tractors are treated like dog's.......the pedigree show variety

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