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Thread: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

  1. #61
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    What, for example, has a fibreglass handle?

  2. #62
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Quote Originally Posted by normanhuntbach View Post
    What, for example, has a fibreglass handle?
    Most new 'fancy' hammers have a fibreglass handle to reduce shock travelling up the handle to the user,

    Very tidy job FF I din't know to cut the slot, learn something new everyday

  3. #63
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread- Hexagon drive thread taps

    Heres a little bodge for making a thread tap suitable for use with a socket or a spanner. Find a suitable nut that is too small to slip on the square end of the tap, using a strong vice or a press, push the tap into the nut so that it broaches out four "splines" in the threaded inside of the nut, leaving a fairly tight fitting hex nut. Not really strong enough to drive a tap properly, but the nut trick works well as a way of driving them in awkward places or when cleaning out iffy threads with the tap in a battery drill+adaptor

    Pictures show three taps, Taper, Second and Plug. Taper is the one to use to start cutting a thread. Second and plug are more for cleaning out jobs, but if you have to get down into a blind hole then you would use them in the order above being careful not to break the parallel plug tap in the bottom of the hole!






    ff
    The best thing about Facebook is the logout button......

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    First post in the new forum , as a toolmaker/come fitter come welder etc etc I find these invaluable, Dormer stud extractors , basically when you shear off a bolt or stud you drill a pilot hole to the recommended size and tap the relevant extractor into the hole and use a tap wrench or an adjustable spanner and the extractor bites into the broken stud and you can unscrew it as normal. I use them in work daily and I done a few jobs at my uncles farm this weekend , he had snapped some wheel studs on his matbro telehandler and I managed to get them out so for 26 you cant go wrong , saves a lot in time and labour with dealers local agri fitters . http://www.lsengineers.co.uk/dormer-...-set-3147.html cheers

  5. #65
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread- Hexagon drive thread taps

    Quote Originally Posted by Footsfitter View Post
    Heres a little bodge for making a thread tap suitable for use with a socket or a spanner. Find a suitable nut that is too small to slip on the square end of the tap, using a strong vice or a press, push the tap into the nut so that it broaches out four "splines" in the threaded inside of the nut, leaving a fairly tight fitting hex nut. Not really strong enough to drive a tap properly, but the nut trick works well as a way of driving them in awkward places or when cleaning out iffy threads with the tap in a battery drill+adaptor

    Pictures show three taps, Taper, Second and Plug. Taper is the one to use to start cutting a thread. Second and plug are more for cleaning out jobs, but if you have to get down into a blind hole then you would use them in the order above being careful not to break the parallel plug tap in the bottom of the hole!






    ff
    or you could buy a set of these like i have! dam handy. i have the 8 piece set. http://www.wurth.co.uk/hand-tools1/t...ocket-set-3pcs

    smaller sizes are 1/4 socket drive and the larger ones in the set are 3/8 drive.

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread- Hexagon drive thread taps

    Quote Originally Posted by ACE View Post
    or you could buy a set of these like i have! dam handy. i have the 8 piece set. http://www.wurth.co.uk/hand-tools1/t...ocket-set-3pcs

    smaller sizes are 1/4 socket drive and the larger ones in the set are 3/8 drive.





    Pity they don't have a better description of them!! But you get the message that they are part of their Time-sert thread inserts from the number of times its mentioned!!!!

    Can't see from the picture but I guess there is the drive square on the top and the tap square up inside with an O ring to hold the tap??


    First time I have seen the Wurth on-line shop, been a long long time coming Rep at Lamma said they wanted to get it right before they would go public.


    ff

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread- Hexagon drive thread taps

    Quote Originally Posted by Footsfitter View Post




    Pity they don't have a better description of them!! But you get the message that they are part of their Time-sert thread inserts from the number of times its mentioned!!!!

    Can't see from the picture but I guess there is the drive square on the top and the tap square up inside with an O ring to hold the tap??


    First time I have seen the Wurth on-line shop, been a long long time coming Rep at Lamma said they wanted to get it right before they would go public.


    ff
    Thats exactly how they are ff.

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    Senior Member ACE's Avatar
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread- Hexagon drive thread taps

    Home made tool to help with refitting uj's, made out of scrap i found about the workshop one day. 1 x piece of 25mm angle iron 1 x 25mm dia off cut of rod
    1 x piece of flat steel welded to angle iron to balance it on top of the vice jaws.

    Makes things alot easier espically when fitting double jointed shafts.



    My first pic uploaded on the new bff so bare with me not got the hang of it yet!

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Ah well, time to get back on "thread"...................................... ....


    Meant to mention in the earlier post about Dienuts



    On the left is a standard split thread die, used in a proper die holder to cut threads as required. (the split is so that you can adjust them slightly and get the correct size thread)
    On the right is a Die Nut, similar tool but not for cutting threads, more for thread cleaning & recovery. Very handy having spanner flats as you can often get them onto the long bit of thread someone left sticking out that has rusted or got damaged and will cause problems when trying to undo it. I have managed to build up a fair sized collection of them. The first ones I bought as an apprentice are still available from Draper, currently they are only about 15 for a set of 5 metric ones 6-12mm (also have UNF & UNC) although only carbon steel they need to be used with a bit of care and with oil but have got me out of many holes over the years, some of the popular ones have been replaced with the likes of Dormer HSS ones.







    Another lifesaver are Thread Files. Basically a square bar profiled to give 8 different thread pitches (sizes). Very handy to recover damaged threads, best to use half the file in the good thread and work your way around the tread, this will keep the pitch correct. The shiny file is a metric one with a handy extra on each end that can be used to recover damaged internal threads at the start of a hole, again often managed to tidy up the start of threads where there has been a miss-threading and it just needs a few splinters tidying up.


    ff

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread- Hexagon drive thread taps

    Quote Originally Posted by ACE View Post


    My first pic uploaded on the new bff so bare with me not got the hang of it yet!

    Well done! Chuck the L plate and stick up a P plate now


    ff

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Heres a trick for cleaning up small parts easily.





    Take one empty grease keg (carefully beaten pouring lip optional), one chip pan/fryer basket and some kerosene, or other cleaning "fluid". Here kerro form the parts washer is pumped into the keg. Put 3-4 inches of liquid in, place parts in basket and place into keg. Using your hand, rapidly contra-rotate the basket with the contents submerged creating bubbles. Usually 20-30 seconds will have most items cleaned up nicely. Finally drain basket before taking to air line and blowing dry whilst still in the basket.

    Garnish & serve



    ff

  12. #72
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    My favourite thread on the new forum If the window rubbers start to come loose and you can't tighten the springy grip part on the glass, I use glazing silicone to stick the rubber to the window. Comes in black so not really noticable.

  13. #73
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread- Hexagon drive thread taps

    Quote Originally Posted by Agricontract View Post
    When changeling pto bearings after taking out the circlips for the bearing caps if you hold shaft dangling the yoke down in one hand and crack the yokes with a hammer with the other the caps walk out with out a lot easyer than you would think with each hammer blow
    Quote Originally Posted by ACE View Post
    Home made tool to help with refitting uj's, made out of scrap i found about the workshop one day. 1 x piece of 25mm angle iron 1 x 25mm dia off cut of rod
    1 x piece of flat steel welded to angle iron to balance it on top of the vice jaws.

    Makes things alot easier espically when fitting double jointed shafts.



    My first pic uploaded on the new bff so bare with me not got the hang of it yet!


    Just a couple of things to add on to these earlier UJ tips-

    When you are assembling the yokes with their new UJ, have a look if it has a sliding spline grease nipple (if its a propshaft) or other nipples on wideangle joints etc, If you can try to fit the new UJ so that it will align up with the others, only a small point but ever greased the front axle propshaft on a tractor where you can see the easy nipples and then try to locate the on on the joint hidden up through the guards slot only to find the nipple is pointing somewhere other than in line with its pals!!

    When assembling the cups into the yoke, press the first cup in a fair way so that you can feed the UJ cross piece into the yoke then backwards into the cup, now using a tool like "ACE's vice assistant" above or a socket, press the cup with the cross piece further on in, way past the circlip groove. Now fit the circlip into its groove (check if its a stamped clip,- look at the edge of the clip, one side will have a nice square edge to it, the other is usually "rounded" somewhat, fit the good square edge facing out). Now edge the cross piece out of the cup so that it sticks slightly out through the other yoke eye, now you will be able to start the 2nd cup onto the cross piece before you reach the yoke eye, (this will allow the needles to slip over their intended bearing surface and not get knocked out which comes to light later on when the 2nd circlip won't fit!!). Now you have to gently use a socket or spacer to push both bearing cups and crosspiece towards the circlip you fitted earlier, when you have reached the circlip, before releasing it, you need to use a hammer and drift to lightly tap the inside of the yoke eye without the circlip which will allow it to spring slightly open and fully reveal the circlip groove, put the circlip in (square edge out!), finally last job before greasing is to free off the joint as you should find that the joint is stiff and refuses to move about easily, simply hold the shaft with joint hanging down so you can strike the yoke next to each bearing cup, the strike will allow the cup,needle rollers and crosspiece to settle inline and you will find that the joint will now articulate as it should.



    ff

  14. #74
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread- Hexagon drive thread taps

    Been using this for years, being American its sometimes been difficult to source, though Ebay has been good on & off although I see that Sparex now actually stock it-







    http://v2.gb.sparex.com/ItemDetails/...ber=905001010#


    Screw Grab is a silvery metallic liquid with a suspension of tiny granules of something very hard, the idea is to apply a small dot of it in the cross slot of screw heads that are too stubborn to undo, the granules form a sort of non-slip bond between the fixings head and the screwdriver, although it also works with hex head socket screws, torx screws and ordinary sockets.

    We used to have a van based autoparts salesman who pushed it a lot, he demonstrated it by gripping a new selftapping screw in a pair of vicegrips and get you to try and turn it with a pozi-drive screwdriver, after you had struggled with the screwdriver camming out of the screw, he would apply a spot of screw grab and then promptly shear the screw off!!

    Worth keeping a bottle or tube in the toolbox



    ff

  15. #75
    Senior Member track marshall's Avatar
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread



    does it really work that well??

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Looks like they have it on ebay as well.

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/TODSG-Toda...item2ec6444a92

  17. #77
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread- Hexagon drive thread taps

    Quote Originally Posted by Footsfitter View Post
    Been using this for years, being American its sometimes been difficult to source, though Ebay has been good on & off although I see that Sparex now actually stock it-






    http://v2.gb.sparex.com/ItemDetails/...ber=905001010#


    Screw Grab is a silvery metallic liquid with a suspension of tiny granules of something very hard, the idea is to apply a small dot of it in the cross slot of screw heads that are too stubborn to undo, the granules form a sort of non-slip bond between the fixings head and the screwdriver, although it also works with hex head socket screws, torx screws and ordinary sockets.

    We used to have a van based autoparts salesman who pushed it a lot, he demonstrated it by gripping a new selftapping screw in a pair of vicegrips and get you to try and turn it with a pozi-drive screwdriver, after you had struggled with the screwdriver camming out of the screw, he would apply a spot of screw grab and then promptly shear the screw off!!

    Worth keeping a bottle or tube in the toolbox



    ff

    The wurth rep tried to sell it to me a few years back but i never bothered with it, no doubt i will be cursing my self tomorrow now i have said that when i round off them dash board screws!

  18. #78
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread- Hexagon drive thread taps

    Quote Originally Posted by track marshall View Post


    does it really work that well??

    Its hard to believe, but yes it does! It just looks like a runny form of valve grinding paste (tried that- no comparison!) What ever the little granules are in it, they form hell of a grip between the driver and the fixing.



    Quote Originally Posted by john63 View Post
    Looks like they have it on ebay as well.

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/TODSG-Toda...item2ec6444a92

    Thats where I have bought mine before, though the little tubes and P&P run up a bit, would be worth asking your Sparex stockist if they would get it in on a stockorder, should be able to sell it once word gets around.



    Quote Originally Posted by ACE View Post
    The wurth rep tried to sell it to me a few years back but i never bothered with it, no doubt i will be cursing my self tomorrow now i have said that when i round off them dash board screws!
    Would be ideal in your case where you get dragged into a job after someone else has had a go at chewing all the fixings up!!


    ff

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Quote Originally Posted by track marshall View Post


    does it really work that well??

    Update. Screwgrab has now changed name is now known as "magic" ...................well it is here, been busy this week removing a timber drying floor from a farm that we once rented the buildings along with land. With a change in circumstances we finally had to remove the floor as we actually owned it. Cant tell you the floor sizes but it was installed around 25 years ago in two stages, a storerite with tunnel and then a few years later a chalow was added to the larger side.

    There were 880 4" No3 pozidrive screws in the storerite and 1220 in the Challow. Most of them came out ok-ish but there were quite a few in the storerite that were corroded and/or wound in too far and the heads had actually gone down into the hardwood planking. In the end we found that putting a 2.5mm drill into the screw head cleaned out the muck and then followed with a good blast of air many screw could be whipped out, but maybe 25% were terrible to engage with the pozi bit.

    These screws had intensive digging out with a scriber and then if still a non-runner it would receive a spot of screw-grab. Our drill man was helping me and he was amazed at the difference a tiny spot of screwgrab made leaving only the hopeless cases to be dug out with a chisel, such was the amazement it wasn't long before screwgrab went and Magic was the new name!! Its just amazing how the tiny gritty stuff in the bottle seems to lock the bit into the screw head.

    One thing that came out during all this, until now I had normally used the small tubes of Screwgrab with no problems but found that with these bottles of screwgrab its worth unscrewing the top nozzle and stirring the grit stuff up with a screwdriver as it seems to settle to the bottom while on the shelf, do this occasionally and there will be no problems.


    A few views of the action....





    Just one word of warning, never store fertilizer on these floors. The previous owners did once and suffered a broken bag which caused all sort of problems from the corrosion.


    ff

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Back to the tricks...........

    Passed on to me by a mate who used to do our mains electrics, old school type who showed me how to straighten out plain galvanized wire when putting up catenary wires to support armoured SWA cables.

    Roll out the galv wire, tie one end to something secure and cut off the amount of wire required plus an extra metre or so. Take your battery drill and put the cut end in the chuck, pull wire taught and then slowly start the drill turning while pulling pretty hard. Keep the drill going as you really pull and eventually the wire will twist off at the chuck, you should find the wire will be left straight and ideal to use.

    Another trick I picked up off of him is when sinking mains recessed sockets in old walls that are very delicate he would produce what he called Dental Plaster, supposed to ultra fast setting plaster of paris, it would be knocked up so that a new switch box would be sunk into a bed of the plaster, hold it for 1-2 min then leave it to go off before carrying on with the job.


    ff

  21. #81

    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Footsfitter View Post
    Back to the tricks...........

    Passed on to me by a mate who used to do our mains electrics, old school type who showed me how to straighten out plain galvanized wire when putting up catenary wires to support armoured SWA cables.

    Roll out the galv wire, tie one end to something secure and cut off the amount of wire required plus an extra metre or so. Take your battery drill and put the cut end in the chuck, pull wire taught and then slowly start the drill turning while pulling pretty hard. Keep the drill going as you really pull and eventually the wire will twist off at the chuck, you should find the wire will be left straight and ideal to use.

    Another trick I picked up off of him is when sinking mains recessed sockets in old walls that are very delicate he would produce what he called Dental Plaster, supposed to ultra fast setting plaster of paris, it would be knocked up so that a new switch box would be sunk into a bed of the plaster, hold it for 1-2 min then leave it to go off before carrying on with the job.


    ff
    twist off at the chuck=break is it?

  22. #82
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Quote Originally Posted by aidank View Post
    twist off at the chuck=break is it?
    Sorry, hard week & nodded off a few times at the keyboard!

    Yes, the far end is attached to a convenient anchor point just by looping it round, the other end is in the drill chuck. Once it has wound the wire up a bit with you pulling to keep it taught the wire will twist off at the chuck.

    Wire drops to the floor nice and straight.



    ff

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread- Eccentric locking bearings

    Been a bit of a gap......

    Sorry if this is old hat..........but for many there may be a first time yet to come




    The Eccentric Locking bearing. Very common on some agricultural machinery, not so popular on non Ag stuff though. Because of the quirky way they are locked to the shaft, they are nearly always used on non-reversable shafts.
    Above is a new insert being installed on the top of the bubble up auger from our NH CR9080 combine, it was changed because the triple lip seal facing up was getting worn and the bearing itself was beginning to get a little bit shaky. NH use a custom housing so it required a delicate touch to remove the old insert without cracking the housing.

    You should just about be able to see the off-centre eccentric mating faces of the bearing and collar







    Here the bearing is on the shaft, generally they are nearly always a slip fit so are easy to get on the shaft.






    Here the locking collar is mounted onto its mating counterpart on the bearing, when the bearing is in the correct position, the collar is always turned in the direction of the shafts rotation The idea is that once the collar is locked to the shaft the action of it rotating means that the bearing should keep tight as the collar in theory is "pulling" the bearings inner race track around by the tapered flange. The proper way is to use a pin wrench, but normal practice is to use a pin punch, a taper one is always best.
    The collar doesn't need to be knocked up murder tight as this will cause problems such as cracking the bearing inner race, distorting the inner race which often makes a new bearing overheat and fail.







    Once the collar is secured then you can nip up the grub screw. Job done.





    ff

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    Thanks FF

    We have loads of those bearings on old Reekie kit and I was never sure which way was the correct rotation for locking the collar (or geting the old one off)

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    If a tractor will not go back together after doing a clutch ie the splines will not line up, go and have a cup off tea then go back and try again and it will go, It has worked for me twice

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread- Eccentric locking bearings

    Quote Originally Posted by Footsfitter View Post
    the collar is always turned in the direction of the shafts rotation The idea is that once the collar is locked to the shaft the action of it rotating means that the bearing should keep tight as the collar in theory is "pulling" the bearings inner race track around by the tapered flange.


    ff
    This has been a subject of a few heated debates at work.......should it be with rotation or against it.....for what its worth I agree with you (with rotation),however during 1 such debate it was decided by somebody (who obviously isn't busy enough) that they would ring our local bearing people to find out a definitive answer .......their answer.......clockwise

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread- Eccentric locking bearings

    Quote Originally Posted by anything good View Post
    This has been a subject of a few heated debates at work.......should it be with rotation or against it.....for what its worth I agree with you (with rotation),however during 1 such debate it was decided by somebody (who obviously isn't busy enough) that they would ring our local bearing people to find out a definitive answer .......their answer.......clockwise
    I have one application where there is no argument over their orientation..................We have an elderly Amazone ZGB8000 trailed spreader and on the floor belt rollers they use flange mount 4-bolt bearing housings with an eccentric insert, but you omit the locking collar as there isn't enough room to get a normal bearing or an eccentric with a collar! Ultra slow moving so there has never been a slippage or wear problem yet


    ff

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread - DIN 7349 washers

    Been hunting for a quite a while to find two things.............. nice thick flat washers and someone who stocks them at a reasonable price! So was surprised to find that Sparex of all places keep DIN 7349 washers. Sometimes there are places where doubling up standard washers just isn't the same and thick washers can be quite handy when fabricating.




    Heres the comparison between a selection I keep- Left to Right is M6,8,10,12 & 14 with the thinner Form A washer stacked on its thick DIN7349 version






    Used to come across a lot of HD thick flat washers when we ran Grimme kit, they would put a proper washer in key places.



    Also available from other suppliers, but heres the Sparex link - http://v2.gb.sparex.com/SearchResult...yword=DIN+7349


    ff

  29. #89
    Senior Member track marshall's Avatar
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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread

    How hard is it to get a sparex account?

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    Re: Workshop "Tricks of the Trade" thread


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