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Thread: terminal sire texel vs hampshire

  1. #151
    andybk
    Guest

    Re: terminal sire texel vs hampshire

    Quote Originally Posted by easyram1 View Post
    You are quite right. The dangers of what both I and GO said is that if commercial sheep farmers producing lambs off grass go out and buy high index rams in the hope of producing more valuable lambs they may well be disapponted that the offspring do no better than those off lo index or non recorded rams when the rams they have bought have been reared under a totally different management system ie using lashings of creep.They then say recorded sheep are no good etc etc when the real problem is the differing management regimes.

    However I think things are on the move and Signet are currently producing a booklet about producing grass/forage fed rams. This is aimed at ram breeders but probably should be compulsory reading for all ram buyers!This book will apparebtly be launched at the NSA event at Malvern in July.
    exactly , and the point i have always been trying to make and to Signet going back years , you cant record under one system and sell to do the same job on another .
    The argument was always, that the differential under a forage system did not give clearly enough defined results between best and worst , surely better to find the one that does make a difference and breed from him as far as possible .not fill him full of creep and ruin his future health and cloud the results .
    I fear any document will fall on deaf ears , as the call of the ring and the feed bucket amongst those type of sellers will always win out .
    the fattest best fed rams always attact the best bids and has always been so .

  2. #152
    Global Ovine
    Guest

    Re: terminal sire texel vs hampshire

    Quote Originally Posted by andybk View Post
    exactly , and the point i have always been trying to make and to Signet going back years , you cant record under one system and sell to do the same job on another .
    The argument was always, that the differential under a forage system did not give clearly enough defined results between best and worst , surely better to find the one that does make a difference and breed from him as far as possible .not fill him full of creep and ruin his future health and cloud the results .
    I fear any document will fall on deaf ears , as the call of the ring and the feed bucket amongst those type of sellers will always win out .
    the fattest best fed rams always attact the best bids and has always been so .


    Agree as far as those types of sellers. But I would punt on that type of selling losing ground rapidly as farmers wake up to the disconnect of overfed rams to commercial reality. Already a number of posters have declared there position outside of the public sale scene by buying or selling rams privately.
    Three things will wake farmers up;
    1. Profit from a flock comes from genetics of the sires, not the grain he was fed. It's profit that needs increasing in the UK sheep industry.
    2. The trend in world grain prices is expected to rise steeply over the next decade. Sheep are the least efficient at conversion to body weight, therefore more reliance on pasture finishing will occur as grain prices rise.
    3. In other sheep countries (especially NZ, Sth Africa and Australia) that change has already occurred to mainly private buying of rams from chosen sellers, because those private sellers were deemed as providing the goods. Economics drove this earlier as subsidies were removed or decreased thereby making profit drivers more transparent.

  3. #153
    petec
    Guest

    Re: terminal sire texel vs hampshire

    Some years ago a college in Wales took a number of ram lambs from different breeders and fed them with free range good grass add lib and allowed in to feed concentrates ad lib . The individual amounts of concentrates volentarily taken by each animal was carefully weighed.
    The daily ammounts varied from about 1/2 lb a day to about 13lbs each from memory.
    Which ones would have appeared at the sales?
    Seriously though, most animals, including humans prefer some types of food to others.
    This is born out by the evolution of different breeds to meet different natural circumstances.

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