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Thread: Adding worms to fields...

  1. #1
    jimwilson
    Guest

    Adding worms to fields...

    Hi,

    This is a weird one but if you guys don't know then no-one will..

    Friend of mine in Holland doing research into improving soil health is adding different species of worm to soil and analysing the result.

    He has heard that a farmer in England has also experimented with adding worms to soil and wanted to get in touch with him to compare results and conclusions.

    Anyone got any idea who is doing the research in the UK?

    PM me if you like or jim at soilessentials.com

    Could be really interesting..

    jim

  2. #2
    SorenIlsoe
    Guest

    Re: Adding worms to fields...

    Interesting question!
    Where shall they come from, when the conditions in the soil gets better?
    Perhaps we should start a breeding system of Lumbricus Terrestris! They are cheaper than steel and they work day and night without salery!

  3. #3
    Elaine
    Guest

    Re: Adding worms to fields...

    Quote Originally Posted by SorenIlsoe View Post
    Interesting question!
    Where shall they come from, when the conditions in the soil gets better?
    Perhaps we should start a breeding system of Lumbricus Terrestris! They are cheaper than steel and they work day and night without salery!
    People DO breed them.http://www.wigglywigglers.co.uk/shop...580CrGTWE096A9

    Though I think they would breed themselves if the soil is right; I don't know if just releasing them really does help before the habitat is OK for them.

  4. #4
    York
    Guest

    Re: Adding worms to fields...

    There was, maybe still is, a report of a farmer in the US which collects the worms from the gras "roads" on his farm when it's wet and places them in certain parts of the field, where there is straw. He could show how the little spots grew larger with worms over the years.
    we just have to face it, that without food for them they will not stay. We have a No Till fields, some of the BFF members have seen it, where they do each year a worm count & harvest and do this also on the neighbours field, which has a tight potatoe rotation. Normaly, as every one expects, the No Till field has higher number, more bio mass and older once. but one poor corp & no cover crop changed the picture within less then 12 month.
    Unfortunately the worms don't start to "moo" like a cow, when they are hungry.
    york-Th.

  5. #5
    jimwilson
    Guest

    Re: Adding worms to fields...

    York,

    I agree that if no food is available any worms added will soon disappear.

    However Soren has a point in that in an “improving” soil ( say one that is very low in OM but has had a large amount of muck applied) the effectiveness of the muck or the effect of adopting direct drilling or cover crops may be limited because of the lack of worm numbers.

    In this case the process of soil improvement may well be speeded up by “seeding” the field with worms.

    Don’t know how they are going to get down the seed drill spouts though.. ;-)

    Jim

  6. #6
    DM
    Guest

    Re: Adding worms to fields...

    Quote Originally Posted by jimwilson View Post

    In this case the process of soil improvement may well be speeded up by “seeding” the field with worms.

    Don’t know how they are going to get down the seed drill spouts though.. ;-)

    Jim
    I'm sure Nickersons could come up with a fancy worm coated seed dressing for a small premium

  7. #7
    Willscale
    Guest

    Re: Adding worms to fields...

    Lumbricus is not native to the USA so they have different issues but I don't really see the point of that in this country where Lumbricus is native.

  8. #8
    fred
    Guest

    Re: Adding worms to fields...

    I have read somewhere that Lucerne compost tea is the ultimate worm charming juice.

  9. #9
    Gothmog
    Guest

    Re: Adding worms to fields...

    few years after i went organic the worm numbers started to grow.
    healthy soil and the right slug pellets and you will have worms without buying them. after all if the soil is not healthy, thats why the worms died out in 1st place so just adding worms again wont solve anything.

  10. #10
    Barleycorn
    Guest

    Re: Adding worms to fields...

    Quote Originally Posted by Gothmog View Post
    few years after i went organic the worm numbers started to grow.
    healthy soil and the right slug pellets and you will have worms without buying them. after all if the soil is not healthy, thats why the worms died out in 1st place so just adding worms again wont solve anything.
    Absolutely agree, we have worms now on really light downland where I never thought that they would come. Heavier ground is covered in wormcasts.

    You certainly notice it when our bloke goes ploughing, never seen seagulls like it, and we're 20 miles from the coast!

  11. #11
    Gadget
    Guest

    Re: Adding worms to fields...

    Quite a few years ago when worm farming was the latest get rich quick scheme, I went on a stand at the Royal Show and got all the sales patter. I am sure that one of the things they were aiming to do was, with the aid of a core cutter, remove cores of soil and replace them with cores containing worms. The aim was to use the system on reclaimed land to try and improve it.

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