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Thread: Dragon boilers

  1. #91
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    Re: Dragon boilers

    Quote Originally Posted by Chippy View Post
    Does anyone think this would be good idea for strapping bundle of logs together and lifting in to dragon length ways with pallet fork?
    http://www.kitepackaging.co.uk/scp/s...trapping-kits/

    Did you ever do it after and what was results like ?
    Lots of metal everywhere ?- can you use a few times maybe ?

  2. #92
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    Re: Dragon boilers

    i spoke to one of the companys and they didn't recommend lifting the bundle with the strap because they weren't designed to lift but they would have been good for holding the bundle together. I tried grabbing a load with muck grab then wrapping baler twine round it to see if that would work but logs are just awkard, I think you have to get the bundle very very tight or it just falls apart so I gave up with that idea. My local builders merchant has been giving me pallet boxes which im filling with lots of bits of logs and wood and trying to get rid of so burning them at the moment. ive also tried filling crate I made with 2 inch box which I fill with round logs 5 feet long then lift it in length ways and this does work well but after 4 burns it started to warp and bend because of the heat. Id like to make a crate which is the shape of the boiler and very thick steel and see if that's any good

  3. #93
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    Re: Dragon boilers

    Looks like all designs / fan arrangements / etc. altered on new dragons now and may be 3rd pass type also on cards maybe ???
    Will it be called a T20 now ???(treble pass)

  4. #94
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    Re: Dragon boilers

    Burnt my first bale of straw today but boiler kept shutting down because flue temp wasn't reaching its set amount but the only thing I can do differently is open the vents that blow air down onto the bale, is that what I should do?

  5. #95
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    Re: Dragon boilers

    Quote Originally Posted by Chippy View Post
    Burnt my first bale of straw today but boiler kept shutting down because flue temp wasn't reaching its set amount but the only thing I can do differently is open the vents that blow air down onto the bale, is that what I should do?
    I know about boilers (Dragon or otherwise) only what I've read on BFF, however some interesting info (which may - or may not - be relevant to this question) came across my screen a few days ago. It relates to the production of bio-char in a cone kiln. The full report can be read here:

    http://www.biochar-journal.org/en/ct...har-production

    but the relevant section is as follows:

    "But underneath the flame of the woodgas the wood itself does not burn but carbonizes, because the gas flame consumes all the oxygen, creating a pyrolysis zone where the flame protects the match from oxidation. As we know, the match burns with a clean flame until someone blows out the flame after which it will smoke. The smoke is just the last unburned and condensing residual wood vapors, released before the match cools sufficiently to stop outgassing them.

    Fig. 2. The example of a match shows how the flame excludes oxygen allowing pyrolysis to take place (image: Thomas Reed)

    A smokeless fire can be made to work just like a match. You light it from above, so that the fire in the uppermost layer heats the next lower layer, which consequently begins to outgas. The gas rises through the flame above, where it is burned. In contrast, when you light a fire from below, the heat will cause the wood layer above to outgas. Much of the ascending gas will escape the flame and condense in the cooler air. This is what we see as smoke. Instead of burning completely, the bottom lit fire sends smoke out the chimney or into the house, or into the clothes, eyes and noses of those seated around the campfire.

    If you layer a wood pile loosely, with enough small branches in the upper layer, and light it at the top, nearly all the resulting wood gas will pass through the overlying flame front and burn so there is only a clean, smoke free combustion gas. Radiant heat from the flame chars the wood beneath layer by layer. Air is drafted in from the sides of the pile, but is updrafted into the flame and consumed in combustion. Under the nearly oxygen-free fire front the char is mostly preserved. As the pyrolysis reduces the wood chunks to smaller pieces that pass down through the loose pile, fresh layers of wood are continually exposed to off-gassing heat below the fire front."

    How is this relevant to your question? Dunno exactly, but maybe you should try opening the vents.

    JV

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