Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: NEW HOLLAND 376 NEEDLE/KNOTTER ISSUE

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    164

    NEW HOLLAND 376 NEEDLE/KNOTTER ISSUE

    Hello all, the old 376 was out this week making a few square bales for cllents. Worked fine for the first few days just missing the odd knot and throwing out a loose bale, personally more loose bales than I would have tolerated if i were the driver, about 15 in every 250 bales. However today it started to really mess up. The needles seem to trip for no reason so we got situations where tiny soft bales were been produced and to make matters worse the twine seemed to wrap around the bill hook. I came to the field in the afternoon to see what all the fuss was about and as I was standing behind the baler I notices that the needles seemed to be tripped three times in succession while the baler was stationary. The driver seemed to think that this tripping of the needles was the cause of the mini/phantom bales and the amout of twine getting caught on the bill hooks. Initially the knotter on the inside was getting twine caught in it but twords the end both knotters were getting twine caught on the bill hooks. The driver said that he had broken a flywheel shearbolt earlier and he said that the plastic twine was not ideal and would have preferred red setter sisal twine. Any ideas on what may cause these issues, especially the needles tripping prematurely would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Senior Member T P's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    The muddy edge of the biggest puddle in the uk
    Posts
    669

    Re: NEW HOLLAND 376 NEEDLE/KNOTTER ISSUE

    Although we had new Holland balers in the past it is along time ago so my memory is hazy. most balers use a mechanism to trip whereby a spiked wheel is turned as the bale progresses in the chamber. The turning of the spiked wheel moves a lever by the friction of a small pulley with a core of usually plastic or rubber up the way until the pulley drops into a notch which "trips" the knotters to cycle. There is usually some sort of spring that holds the lever onto the pulley and more spring(s)inside the knotter shaft end that engage the dogs to stop or catch the knotter shaft after one revolution, from what you describe I suspect the knotter mechanism is not being caught after one revolution and is continuing a second or third time before halting. Off the top of my head the only easy thing to check is the knotter brake mechanism is providing enough drag to stop it banging to a halt and rebounding and disengaging again the rest of the stuff is likely well buried and could involve a bit of stripping. I'm sure someone with more recent experience will be along soon with a more precise answer but first off check that the brake is working properly, it's common for the discs to rust especially if stored in the open and eat the pads or the pads to jam. The brake is a necessary item to control backlash and rebound_not an optional extra. As you say the machine worked fine initially either a spring broke on the dog that catches it again (dog might be worn) or the brake deteriorated after a lot of revolutions. The latter should be easy fixed, I don't know about the former depending on access.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    164

    Re: NEW HOLLAND 376 NEEDLE/KNOTTER ISSUE

    Hi TP, Thanks for the info. It turned out the issue was on the knotter end of the trip arm where two pauls overlap while the bale is been made. In this case one paul was out of allignment throught wear and once adjusted the baler worked pretty much ok. Still produced 5 untied bales out of 420 but for an a 40 year old antique its not bad. Thanks again.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •