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Thread: Techmagri Profilab

  1. #1
    FarmerDan
    Guest

    Techmagri Profilab

    Not sure if this is the right place for this thread, but I saw one of these being demo'd and thought it looked like a viable alternative to a conventional subsoiler for those of us without 250 hp.

    Given that DD won't work on my farm this year (IMO) if we keep having rain like we have and that I need to loosen the soil deeper for both OSR and beet (beet requiring tilth too) if I want yield, then will this machine do the job?

    Anyone out there running one? Or a Quivogne Saturn (same sort of thing).

    Like the method of action better than the Trio as I think better for soil structure.

  2. #2
    TINTIN
    Guest

    Re: Techmagri Profilab

    we run 2 machines and they are brilliant.would put them up against a sumo any day!you wont use half the diesel also!

  3. #3
    walter melon
    Guest

    Re: Techmagri Profilab

    We couldn't get it to deal with chopped straw very well as it does not mix it properly.

    On clean baled stubble though you couldn't fault the job it did.

  4. #4
    charlie brown
    Guest

    Re: Techmagri Profilab

    Would it be fair to say that these machines can do shallow subsoiling with low surface disturbance, rather like the old Paraplow?

    If that is the case they may be ideal machines for those of us that are doing true low disturbance direct drilling and feel the need for a little shallow subsoiling. But I'm a bit confused as to why they have the wavy discs behind, wouldn't a packer of some sort be more suitable?

    cb

  5. #5
    FarmerDan
    Guest

    Re: Techmagri Profilab

    Quote Originally Posted by charlie brown View Post
    Would it be fair to say that these machines can do shallow subsoiling with low surface disturbance, rather like the old Paraplow?

    If that is the case they may be ideal machines for those of us that are doing true low disturbance direct drilling and feel the need for a little shallow subsoiling. But I'm a bit confused as to why they have the wavy discs behind, wouldn't a packer of some sort be more suitable?

    cb
    This explains it pretty well...

    http://www.techmagri-uk.co.uk/downlo...w-it-works.pdf

    I would not describe the machine as low disturbance though. When I saw one working, there was a fair bit of tilth behind it. The discs are to chop residue but do not mix the residue with soil like say a trio would... they leave it all on the surface.

  6. #6
    TINTIN
    Guest

    Re: Techmagri Profilab

    the profilab will break up all the soil but will not bring up anything from down below!the wavy discs do a fantastic job.you have to see the machine working to see how good a good it does.we drilled over 300 acres of rape with the machine with the seeder on last year and every farmer wants us back again this year!!

  7. #7
    Feldspar
    Guest

    Re: Techmagri Profilab

    The Profilab doesn't seem to have been discussed much on here which surprises me a little. Particularly this year where soils will be compacted there will be a wish (and arguably a need) to have something that can loosen the soil next summer without using vast amounts of hp / fuel. The Profilab seems to fit the bill nicely.

    Speaking personally I think any hope that our soils will somehow self-structure over the coming months allowing everything to be DDed next year is unrealistic. Cover crops will not be sufficient in many cases - they cannot level huge ruts and they also have to be able to germinate and root to perform their biological tillage role.

    The Profilab doesn't look like it would be hugely expensive and would give pretty decent work rates in a 4m guise with the option of putting rape and beans in.

    I see the comment above about it not mixing the straw properly. Is this really much of a problem? I would say it could be an advantage depending on the drill.

    Does anyone have experience of it working in heavy clay? What sort of finish does it leave? Do the cutting discs work well on these types of soils? Does it loosen without generating huge clods when working at depth (i.e. 8-10 inches)? Does it do a good job of levelling fields?

  8. #8
    charlie brown
    Guest

    Re: Techmagri Profilab

    We bought a 3m SMS machine for this autumn. It uses the same "michel" patent legs as the profilab, but we opted for a split roller behind because we wanted it purely for rape drilling. After some experimentation we took every other leg out for drilling the rape.

    About 50% of this rape may make it .
    100% of the Sim-tec dd'ed failed.

    Exceptional year, but I think we will use it again.

    cb

  9. #9
    Feldspar
    Guest

    Re: Techmagri Profilab

    Quote Originally Posted by charlie brown View Post
    We bought a 3m SMS machine for this autumn. It uses the same "michel" patent legs as the profilab, but we opted for a split roller behind because we wanted it purely for rape drilling. After some experimentation we took every other leg out for drilling the rape.

    About 50% of this rape may make it .
    100% of the Sim-tec dd'ed failed.

    Exceptional year, but I think we will use it again.

    cb
    Do you think (using all the legs) that it would be the equivalent of ploughing then pressing?

  10. #10
    Right-arm fast
    Guest

    Re: Techmagri Profilab

    Quote Originally Posted by Feldspar View Post
    The Profilab doesn't seem to have been discussed much on here which surprises me a little. Particularly this year where soils will be compacted there will be a wish (and arguably a need) to have something that can loosen the soil next summer without using vast amounts of hp / fuel. The Profilab seems to fit the bill nicely.

    Speaking personally I think any hope that our soils will somehow self-structure over the coming months allowing everything to be DDed next year is unrealistic. Cover crops will not be sufficient in many cases - they cannot level huge ruts and they also have to be able to germinate and root to perform their biological tillage role.

    The Profilab doesn't look like it would be hugely expensive and would give pretty decent work rates in a 4m guise with the option of putting rape and beans in.

    I see the comment above about it not mixing the straw properly. Is this really much of a problem? I would say it could be an advantage depending on the drill.

    Does anyone have experience of it working in heavy clay? What sort of finish does it leave? Do the cutting discs work well on these types of soils? Does it loosen without generating huge clods when working at depth (i.e. 8-10 inches)? Does it do a good job of levelling fields?
    We ran one for a bit, it generally did a very good job but we found on our clayier soil that the wavey discs blocked solid in wet areas and perhaps didnt work the ground quite enough so not leaving a drillable seedbed. On the better land it was very good and excellent for sowing osr. In the end we opted for a trio because the roller wont block and incorporates the straw.

  11. #11
    FarmerDan
    Guest

    Re: Techmagri Profilab

    We ended up buying a Quivogne Saturn (which uses the same tines as the profilab) and are pretty happy with it. I'm viewing it very much as a transition tool from ploughing to direct drilling.

    Our OSR was established using one and looks well, but it moves a lot of soil, and I couldn't follow it with a disc drill even after rolling as it left our ground (fairly light) too fluffy.

    However once the ground got wet we parked it up and put the plough on, which is of course a criminal offence.

    They are reputedly not so good on really heavy stuff. Best have a demo if you're not sure.

  12. #12
    charlie brown
    Guest

    Re: Techmagri Profilab

    Quote Originally Posted by Feldspar View Post
    Do you think (using all the legs) that it would be the equivalent of ploughing then pressing?
    Well of course it doesnt invert anything.

    But if conditions are right the "michel" legs are very good (IMHO) at relieving surface compaction and getting some "air" into the soil.

    We also have a 4m Besson Heliplow, which uses the same legs, but in a different pattern and at a more agressive angle. It proved an excellent tool behind the CAT for getting rid of surface compaction with a little mixing behind the Anglian Biosolids. We used it fairly shallow with two passes,this levelled the ruts nicely.Probably my best crops of wheat this year are behind this machine.

    I gather most subsoilers in France are sold with Michel legs.

    cb

  13. #13
    York
    Guest

    Re: Techmagri Profilab

    I don't know, please excuse my ignorance, why you are embracing this leg. Wasn't the Paraplow originated on your island? What is the difference? Why not pull the Paraplow out of the nettles?
    York-Th.
    p.s. have several farms which just did this.

  14. #14
    SoggySalopian
    Guest

    Re: Techmagri Profilab

    Does anyone have any experience of the Kongskilde Paragrubber?
    Six paraplow legs with an asymmetrical wavy-disc press behind seems like a good idea but I've never found anyone who's used one. Amongst other things I like the idea of wavy discs that either cut clods or press depending on which way round you mount them.

    There's also the Remac system which uses Michel tines but fewer of them than the other makers and a lightweight roller instead of a press.

  15. #15
    Feldspar
    Guest

    Re: Techmagri Profilab

    Quote Originally Posted by York View Post
    I don't know, please excuse my ignorance, why you are embracing this leg. Wasn't the Paraplow originated on your island? What is the difference? Why not pull the Paraplow out of the nettles?
    York-Th.
    p.s. have several farms which just did this.
    Don't have one in the nettles and I've nothing against the French! Not necessarily thinking of buying anything, just curious.

  16. #16
    York
    Guest

    Re: Techmagri Profilab

    Quote Originally Posted by Feldspar View Post
    Don't have one in the nettles and I've nothing against the French! Not necessarily thinking of buying anything, just curious.
    Sorry, if some got it wrong or been offended. It's not about the French or that I can't see the posetive of this unit. It just looks so very similar to a Paraplow and with that one originated on the island I was expecting some more input from the "oldtimers" which where active farmers when the Paraplow was used quite intensively. I know for many I'm as well belonging to the group of "oldtimers" but I haven't got any long term or even workable experience with this tool in question.
    And maybe there is a big differance between the Michael tine & the paraplow tine? Than call it my ignorance to technical vital important details, but please point them out.
    York-Th.

  17. #17
    Feldspar
    Guest

    Re: Techmagri Profilab

    Quote Originally Posted by York View Post
    Sorry, if some got it wrong or been offended. It's not about the French or that I can't see the posetive of this unit. It just looks so very similar to a Paraplow and with that one originated on the island I was expecting some more input from the "oldtimers" which where active farmers when the Paraplow was used quite intensively. I know for many I'm as well belonging to the group of "oldtimers" but I haven't got any long term or even workable experience with this tool in question.
    And maybe there is a big differance between the Michael tine & the paraplow tine? Than call it my ignorance to technical vital important details, but please point them out.
    York-Th.
    My comment was written in jest.

  18. #18
    charlie brown
    Guest

    Re: Techmagri Profilab

    Quote Originally Posted by York View Post
    Sorry, if some got it wrong or been offended. It's not about the French or that I can't see the posetive of this unit. It just looks so very similar to a Paraplow and with that one originated on the island I was expecting some more input from the "oldtimers" which where active farmers when the Paraplow was used quite intensively. I know for many I'm as well belonging to the group of "oldtimers" but I haven't got any long term or even workable experience with this tool in question.
    And maybe there is a big differance between the Michael tine & the paraplow tine? Than call it my ignorance to technical vital important details, but please point them out.
    York-Th.
    I had one of the first Howard Paraplows, and it was a good tool for removing shallow compaction without massive soil surface disturbance. They were much bigger and longer legs than the Michel tine, at a shallower angle. They also had an adjustable flap on the back surface enabling more or less disturbance. A disc mounted on a slant cut a slit for the leg.

    But it had to be worked in "lands" as the legs all slanted in one direction, and it only took a narrow cut as the max no of legs was 4, any more and the machine would just have been too long. But low hp to pull (110)

    We used it a lot back in the straw burning days when we dd'ed everything, and we did a lot of work with ADAS using "dipwells" to see how efficient the machine had been.

    It was in the nettles until about 6 yrs ago when I was persuaded to sell it to a friend.

    cb

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