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  1. #1
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    harvest in the 50's

    OK In have bought this from the dark side
    it would be great if these characters could be identified.
    hope this link works
    The bags on the trailer seem to indicate that they are from Towcester in south Northamptonshire so that area or North Bucks West Beds or East OxfOrdshire
    however we have no clue and it has been posted quite widely on Facebook as well
    I have wondered. if it is a posed shot for a film, TV drama or some such
    https://d1hu4133i4rt3z.cloudfront.ne...9a8bb05521.jpg
    Ixworth Solar Farming Ltd.

  2. #2
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    Re: harvest in the 50's

    They do all look a bit too clean especially if they'd been riding on that bagger Massey Harris long enough to be ready for a break.
    I'm a bit surprised by the expensive looking wristwatches too.
    It's possible someone took the chance to get a shot while everyone looked presentable for some other reason.

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    Re: harvest in the 50's

    Quote Originally Posted by Exfarmer View Post
    OK In have bought this from the dark side
    it would be great if these characters could be identified.
    hope this link works
    The bags on the trailer seem to indicate that they are from Towcester in south Northamptonshire so that area or North Bucks West Beds or East OxfOrdshire
    however we have no clue and it has been posted quite widely on Facebook as well
    I have wondered. if it is a posed shot for a film, TV drama or some such
    https://d1hu4133i4rt3z.cloudfront.ne...9a8bb05521.jpg
    They all seem to have similar features. I wonder if they were grandfather, sons, and grandson.
    jack caley

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    Re: harvest in the 50's

    Sorry but I am deeply sceptical. The little MH 735 combine is a bagger but I spent many hours on a 726, 780, & 780S baggers and there is no way you come off one of those looking as clean as those chaps do. They almost look to have new hats on, they are very clean. And look at the chap on the right, you would never wear a flat cap at that angle if you were working on a bagger combine. The thermos flasks are a more modern design than were available in the '50s. But the deciding factor for me was the Shell oil container on the trailer. That is a plastic 20 litre container and in those days all oil containers were metal and usually 5 gallon. And the quality of the photo. is too good for the 50s. Colour and as sharp as that ? I don't think so.

    My guess is that the sacks from Towcester were hired sacks which you could get in those days if you hadn't got enough cow cake sacks. There was one firm that hired sacks and they were called "squirrel" sacks with a picture of a squirrel on them. You could of course get hold of railway sacks. Very thick and you could get two hundredweight and a quarter of wheat in one, a bit less than 2 hundredweight of barley and a "hundred and half" of oats.

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    Re: harvest in the 50's

    No sign of a spout.....they used to stick up fairly high...nor the top of the tank.

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    Re: harvest in the 50's

    Quote Originally Posted by Gee View Post
    No sign of a spout.....they used to stick up fairly high...nor the top of the tank.
    It's a bagger.

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    Re: harvest in the 50's

    Yep realised that was not the issue after I posted.....deletion failed.
    As a fairly young youngster I assisted with the bagging.
    Thinking about it last night 40 acres of wheat here is a good days combining now, thatís
    180 tons of Wheat......to get lifted and back home.

    Short length of water pipe was the tool here for lifting sacks....two men, one either side and the pipe near the bottom of the sack eased the job considerably.
    There was a host of sack hire companies....all the local feed...seed companies did it.
    Annual job here was to go through the on farm store of sacks ....pair of wool shears and a jar of copydex , patching up any mice holes.
    Sacks used to be stored over wires strung between the beams in the granary, to prevent easy mouse access.
    Happy Days?

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    Re: harvest in the 50's

    Quote Originally Posted by zaza View Post
    Sorry but I am deeply sceptical. The little MH 735 combine is a bagger but I spent many hours on a 726, 780, & 780S baggers and there is no way you come off one of those looking as clean as those chaps do. They almost look to have new hats on, they are very clean. And look at the chap on the right, you would never wear a flat cap at that angle if you were working on a bagger combine. The thermos flasks are a more modern design than were available in the '50s. But the deciding factor for me was the Shell oil container on the trailer. That is a plastic 20 litre container and in those days all oil containers were metal and usually 5 gallon. And the quality of the photo. is too good for the 50s. Colour and as sharp as that ? I don't think so.

    My guess is that the sacks from Towcester were hired sacks which you could get in those days if you hadn't got enough cow cake sacks. There was one firm that hired sacks and they were called "squirrel" sacks with a picture of a squirrel on them. You could of course get hold of railway sacks. Very thick and you could get two hundredweight and a quarter of wheat in one, a bit less than 2 hundredweight of barley and a "hundred and half" of oats.
    My my first thought was that the combine was a Massey 21, but when I saw the reel I think it was a 726. I have photos of both of them, from my young days. The trailer would suggest the days before the hydraulic tipping trailer. Tye of York used to do one where you just took out a pin out of the chassis and then upended it!
    With regard to lifting the 18 stone sacks on to the trailer I have done that all day! We did not use a pipe, usually a broken pitchfork shaft, which we called a hicking stick.
    The other guy I did it with is still alive at 90, and lives nearby. I am not so sure but to me the thermos flasks do look pretty old.
    But why would anyone stage it?
    jack caley

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    Re: harvest in the 50's

    Sorry Jack but the combine is not a 726. They were a much larger combine and had totally different air boxes. It's a little 735.

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    Re: harvest in the 50's

    Quote Originally Posted by zaza View Post
    Sorry Jack but the combine is not a 726. They were a much larger combine and had totally different air boxes. It's a little 735.
    Zara,
    It is not often I am wrong, but I am wrong yet again!
    My apologies you are right, I googled Massey Harris 735 and came across a reconditioned one down in Devon.
    All this nostalgia does emphasise the evolution that has taken place in agriculture, for which I do not think enough credit is given.
    I first drove a Massey 21 in1951. We combined 220 acres and finished in November!
    jack caley

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