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Thread: MF6499 radiator replacement and waterpump rebuild.

  1. #1
    Senior Member Footsfitter's Avatar
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    MF6499 radiator replacement and waterpump rebuild.

    Back in June while getting ready for harvest I had our largest wheeled tractor a MF6499 in for a weeping radiator. the core had been damp along part of the bottom section for a while but now a noise had started to come out of the front of the Sisu engine. Normally they sound like a sewing machine when idling but it sounded like we might have a waterpump issue- a common trait on these- a few years ago the smaller 6480 we have succumbed when we were really busy so a £600 pump got slapped on.

    With time to spare our dealer shifted a rad in stock in Warwickshire down to us with a decent in-stock discount and because we had been bitten by the 6480's pump price I had pulled it apart to ID the seal and bearings so these were in stock to rebuild the pump if ever there was the time to !!




    They are a fair sized lump, but still a bit of respect is needed to avoid wrecking something. Off comes the twin pully









    Just a simple pair of ball races





    Round the back is the impeller cover, just a couple of 6mm sets hold it in place. I get it out by squirting some plus gas round the oring and then tap it with a hammer all round and then it starts to bounce out a bit, when the groove/oring appears a gentle pry with a blunt instrument has it out.





    There you are, now we can use the press to carefully push the shaft and bearings out of the housing having removed the circlip at the front.




    The Impeller moves a tad up to the housing as the bearings start to move, then the shaft starts to move out of the impeller, voilą!






    Now the shaft seal is visible and is simply pushed out







    Here we are with everything cleaned up, The shaft with 2 new bearings and the seal have been installed ( I pull the inner seals off the bearings and add enough grease to 1/4 fill the cavity between the bearings. if it makes them last longer we shall see but I'm sure it will help?) With the circlip back in it time to put the sprung loaded shaft seal in. This requires the outer tin housing to be pressed in at the same time as the inner sleeve being pressed onto the shaft. Do it wrong and the seal will be wrecked.







    Heres a tool turned up in the lathe to push both bits of the seal together






    Same thing different view!





    With the aid of the vernier gauge I'd figured out the required distance between the two steps and bored out to take both the seal and shaft






    Heres the tool loaded with the old seal to give an idea







    So heres the seal in place and next the impeller goes back on- I pressed it back to the same depth as it was before dismantling it. Its important to sit the shafts threaded end on the press bed and press the impeller on so that the bearings are not marked.








    There it goes - usually theres a socket that makes the ideal spacer to push on.





    And that leaves the back plate and new oring to go in.
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  2. #2
    Senior Member Footsfitter's Avatar
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    Re: MF6499 radiator replacement and waterpump rebuild.

    With the pump rebuilt it was refitted along with new thermostats and a belts. Then its was in with the new radiator followed by the cooler packs.








    Theres a fair old few items to the cooler pack - Note the wheels and mudguards are off- one of the joys of having the wheel trolly and air wrench to make removal a doddle and access to the job much easier.







    Nice new shiny radiator in place along with all the other bits and pieces.







    These are small top-hat bushes that form several pivots for the cooler packs as they hinge up out of the way, several has vibrated sideways wearing them through to the bolt and allowing the packs to slop about a bit. OE ones were not ex-stock so it was simpler to put a bit of brass bar in the lathe and turn a few up, when they were assembled I also found out some nice fibre washers to space out the sideways slop and hopefully stop the side-to-side movement and chafing of the bushes










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