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Thread: Fences

  1. #1
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    Fences

    Hi All,

    I am looking at doing some fencing, got a few paddocks to set up and was wondering what the opinion was on augers or post drivers? I am considering either on a circa 40hp tractor.

    What method is best for installing square posts which will have 3 rails on them holding in livestock? Auger the holes and fill in or just driving them into the ground? Probably be about 5ft high at the end of the day?

    Thanks,

    Kevin

  2. #2
    Senior Member 4wd's Avatar
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    Re: Fences

    The post driver is most versatile and they can bash in strainers as a rule, which surprised me.
    Even ground with stones and roots they will usually go in with perhaps minor relocation
    Your tractor sounds on the small side hydraulic output more important than power/weight.
    The augers are OK but only for larger posts, the small tractor would be advantage for getting into awkward corners.
    We did get one some twenty years ago but I doubt it did more than 30 holes.
    When it's not too dry you can push fence stakes in with a regular front loader but perfectionists might not be happy about how straight they go in.

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    Re: Fences

    Wearing my tin hat....

    I'd go for the auger, coz that provides some positioning freedom to get the posts dead in line. A post & rail fence which is not straight is not a sight to behold - and while I would normally go for a driver, my experience is that it is much more difficult to get a neat line.

    JV
    Agtronix - the home of the Weedswiper

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    Re: Fences

    Quote Originally Posted by 4wd View Post
    The post driver is most versatile and they can bash in strainers as a rule, which surprised me.
    Even ground with stones and roots they will usually go in with perhaps minor relocation
    Your tractor sounds on the small side hydraulic output more important than power/weight.
    The augers are OK but only for larger posts, the small tractor would be advantage for getting into awkward corners.
    We did get one some twenty years ago but I doubt it did more than 30 holes.
    When it's not too dry you can push fence stakes in with a regular front loader but perfectionists might not be happy about how straight they go in.
    Thanks for the feedback. The pump flow for the tractor is 43.9lpm. I was looking at the smaller types of post driver but will double check the required specs.

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    Re: Fences

    Quote Originally Posted by john maddock View Post
    Wearing my tin hat....

    I'd go for the auger, coz that provides some positioning freedom to get the posts dead in line. A post & rail fence which is not straight is not a sight to behold - and while I would normally go for a driver, my experience is that it is much more difficult to get a neat line.

    JV
    Thanks, so that is one vote for auger and one for post driver. Again I know tractor has both hydraulics and PTO so could go for either option. They would be square posts with an auger I imagine there is other things to consider like filling in hole etc. where with driver you are relying on the solid ground around to hold the post firm?

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    Re: Fences

    Quote Originally Posted by Kevee View Post
    Thanks, so that is one vote for auger and one for post driver. Again I know tractor has both hydraulics and PTO so could go for either option. They would be square posts with an auger I imagine there is other things to consider like filling in hole etc. where with driver you are relying on the solid ground around to hold the post firm?
    Usual trick here for backfilling is to use finely crushed rock , 6mm minus. It means outlay to buy the stuff, but huge saving in time and labour compared to ramming earth back in the hole - and risking a moved post, if a straight line is desired.
    Agtronix - the home of the Weedswiper

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    Re: Fences

    Quote Originally Posted by john maddock View Post
    Usual trick here for backfilling is to use finely crushed rock , 6mm minus. It means outlay to buy the stuff, but huge saving in time and labour compared to ramming earth back in the hole - and risking a moved post, if a straight line is desired.
    Kevee - do you get frost in the ground where you are at? if yes, putting some concrete in the bottom of the drilled hole (down below normal frost line) then set the pole in it will help keep the pole from frost heaving.

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    Re: Fences

    Quote Originally Posted by Ironhead View Post
    Kevee - do you get frost in the ground where you are at? if yes, putting some concrete in the bottom of the drilled hole (down below normal frost line) then set the pole in it will help keep the pole from frost heaving.
    We do not normally get bad frosts because not too open but some areas due to ground layout can have standing water for a few days where as other areas would have soaked into the ground.

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    Re: Fences

    Quote Originally Posted by john maddock View Post
    Usual trick here for backfilling is to use finely crushed rock , 6mm minus. It means outlay to buy the stuff, but huge saving in time and labour compared to ramming earth back in the hole - and risking a moved post, if a straight line is desired.
    Thanks, would you say that doing this makes a fence post stronger then just driving it into the ground? It will need to withstand kicking and leaning\rubbing against.

  10. #10
    Senior Member wr.'s Avatar
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    Re: Fences

    In your case, I would also go for the auger. Square posts are bu66ers to keep in line when driving them in with a knocker. They will usually twist a bit as they are going in. If you were using round posts, the knocker would be the better option IMO.
    Don't itch for something if you're not prepared to scratch for it.

  11. #11
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    Re: Fences

    Quote Originally Posted by 4wd View Post
    The post driver is most versatile and they can bash in strainers as a rule, which surprised me.
    Even ground with stones and roots they will usually go in with perhaps minor relocation
    Your tractor sounds on the small side hydraulic output more important than power/weight.
    The augers are OK but only for larger posts, the small tractor would be advantage for getting into awkward corners.
    We did get one some twenty years ago but I doubt it did more than 30 holes.
    When it's not too dry you can push fence stakes in with a regular front loader but perfectionists might not be happy about how straight they go in.
    Piece of string tied to loader about a foot from the post..weight on the end. Make it the length that you want the post to be above the ground. Then when pressing you can see vertical left and right.....some one else there can check in the other direction....not perfect but it helps.
    When the weight hits the ground that’s far enough....
    ”Tip” use round posts!
    Stoney ground does not suit either.....Depends on the size of the stones
    Biggish stones will deflect the auger as with the Knocker.
    Pretty sure you can hire a portable man held auger from tool hire companies.
    Smaller tractor would suit an auger better than a knocker.....PTO driven rather than the Oil driven Knocker.

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    Re: Fences

    Quote Originally Posted by wr. View Post
    In your case, I would also go for the auger. Square posts are bu66ers to keep in line when driving them in with a knocker. They will usually twist a bit as they are going in. If you were using round posts, the knocker would be the better option IMO.
    I had not thought about them twisting, I was thinking that the square posts would be easier to nail the railings too.

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    Re: Fences

    Quote Originally Posted by Gee View Post
    Piece of string tied to loader about a foot from the post..weight on the end. Make it the length that you want the post to be above the ground. Then when pressing you can see vertical left and right.....some one else there can check in the other direction....not perfect but it helps.
    When the weight hits the ground that’s far enough....
    ”Tip” use round posts!
    Stoney ground does not suit either.....Depends on the size of the stones
    Biggish stones will deflect the auger as with the Knocker.
    Pretty sure you can hire a portable man held auger from tool hire companies.
    Smaller tractor would suit an auger better than a knocker.....PTO driven rather than the Oil driven Knocker.
    Thanks for the tip, is this due to the hydraulic flow needed for the knocker or more to do with stability?

  14. #14
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    Re: Fences

    Bit of both...
    The original Knockers like the Parmiter were fairly light ....as the years have gone on the have got heavier.
    Oil flow is quite important....but the return flow is Much more important.
    Ideally it needs to be via a return that exits below the oil level in the gearbox, to prevent frothing etc.
    Not so easy on anything older....also need to be of a largish flow capacity to prevent it restricting the hammer fall.
    For a small number of posts probably not a huge problem but that’s the way they are.
    Square posts.....weld up a bar with a claw that can grip the post below the hammer plate....helps you prevent the post wandering.

  15. #15
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    Re: Fences

    If you have heavy clay soil like me, knocking posts in is barely feasible for 9 months of the year: the ground sets like concrete, and the post either doesn't go in, or just splinters. An auger won't go in very well either, except for the first 20cm or so, BUT you can go along and start a series of holes, top them up with water, and then leave them for an hour. You'll then be able to go down a good bit further, and in many cases deep enough for a post.

    I use an 8" auger for 5x3 "Motorway" posts, which allows a bit of freedom to get the posts exactly in line. Crushed stone has been mentioned as backfill, but I use pea sized shingle, which works beautifully, and knocking the post a few times with a mallet shakes it down and locks it well.

  16. #16
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    Re: Fences

    Yes they will....
    With some decent posts...
    https://iowafarmequipment.com/bryce-...t-drivers.html



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    Re: Fences

    Quote Originally Posted by Gee View Post
    Yes they will....
    With some decent posts...
    https://iowafarmequipment.com/bryce-...t-drivers.html


    Impressive machine - but an even more impressive post! What sort of timber was it , to not shatter?

    JV
    Agtronix - the home of the Weedswiper

  18. #18
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    Re: Fences

    Good question.....UK videos are in Bryces yard.....suspect timber would be nothing special....other than good sound wood most likely Pine or Spruce of some sort.
    May have been imported from Scandinavia where wood due to slower growing is much more dense....def not hard wood.

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