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Thread: HayBob

  1. #1
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    HayBob

    Hi All,

    Looking at getting my first hay making machinery for my smallholding. I have seen a few second hand PZ Haybobs for sale and was thinking for my first season and due to me doing hay just for my own use these may do the job.

    I have seen 275's and 300's for sale, is there much difference with these apart from the working width because there is a few hundred pound difference on a well known auction site. I only have a cat1 linkage so something compatible would be ideal.

    Thanks,

    Kevin

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    Re: HayBob

    Firstly it all depends on how much haymaking you are planning to do. I used to bale for 4-5 customers who used to make between 50-70 acres each and they graduated to a Havbob after the Acrobat/Cock Pheasant/Wuffler days had run their course. I used to make about 40 acres for myself and with that and the hay that I made for other customers my best days were with a 6 star Centipede but we had to row up with an Acrobat and, like most machines, including a Haybob, if you send someone to do the job when they don't know how to use the particular machine then it can be a recipe for disaster.

    The Centipede could do 12 acres an hour if the going was O.K. but I found that when we went to Haybobs (and I only ever had PZ machines) it was less hassle teaching people how to use them properly to ted and row up. I expect that there will be some comments on here saying that Haybobs are a load of rubbish but it's all about using them the right way. I wrote a document once, which I still have somewhere, telling my chaps how I wanted them to use the Haybobs. I was doing the baling and it was important that I could get in and out in the shortest possible time and get on to the next job.

    The condition of the Haybob is more important than the model. I assume that it's going to be baled with a conventional baler ?

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    Re: HayBob

    Quote Originally Posted by zaza View Post
    Firstly it all depends on how much haymaking you are planning to do. I used to bale for 4-5 customers who used to make between 50-70 acres each and they graduated to a Havbob after the Acrobat/Cock Pheasant/Wuffler days had run their course. I used to make about 40 acres for myself and with that and the hay that I made for other customers my best days were with a 6 star Centipede but we had to row up with an Acrobat and, like most machines, including a Haybob, if you send someone to do the job when they don't know how to use the particular machine then it can be a recipe for disaster.

    The Centipede could do 12 acres an hour if the going was O.K. but I found that when we went to Haybobs (and I only ever had PZ machines) it was less hassle teaching people how to use them properly to ted and row up. I expect that there will be some comments on here saying that Haybobs are a load of rubbish but it's all about using them the right way. I wrote a document once, which I still have somewhere, telling my chaps how I wanted them to use the Haybobs. I was doing the baling and it was important that I could get in and out in the shortest possible time and get on to the next job.

    The condition of the Haybob is more important than the model. I assume that it's going to be baled with a conventional baler ?
    I agree with zaza about the condition of the machine being important. If it has tynes which can be adjusted for tedding or rowing, check that all can be moved to both positions. If the machine has not been stored in a shed, rust will prevent easy movement. The original model I have has 4 different tynes: left & right, wide & narrow. They work best if all of those are correct.

    The only bad feature of the PZ Haybob in my opinion is that they don't invert the hay, and as a consequence the bottom of a row tends to be damp. A combination of a Haybob and a fingerwheel will produce a better result. The Haybob for tedding, then maybe rowing, followed by the fingerwheel to roll the row over, and if that produces a ragged row, go through again with the Haybob set for rowing. The Haybob design tucks the hay in at the bottom, so it is easier for the baler to pick up.

    JV
    Agtronix - the home of the Weedswiper

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    Re: HayBob

    Quote Originally Posted by john maddock View Post
    I agree with zaza about the condition of the machine being important. If it has tynes which can be adjusted for tedding or rowing, check that all can be moved to both positions. If the machine has not been stored in a shed, rust will prevent easy movement. The original model I have has 4 different tynes: left & right, wide & narrow. They work best if all of those are correct.

    The only bad feature of the PZ Haybob in my opinion is that they don't invert the hay, and as a consequence the bottom of a row tends to be damp. A combination of a Haybob and a fingerwheel will produce a better result. The Haybob for tedding, then maybe rowing, followed by the fingerwheel to roll the row over, and if that produces a ragged row, go through again with the Haybob set for rowing. The Haybob design tucks the hay in at the bottom, so it is easier for the baler to pick up.

    JV
    Forgot to say, the early models tended to crack where the top link mast joined the cross tube on which the rotors are mounted. Check.

    JV
    Agtronix - the home of the Weedswiper

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    Re: HayBob

    The way to make sure that the grass is moved properly is when you go through it first time with the Haybob after mowing make sure that you drive so that you are meeting the grass heads. i.e. don't approach it from the cut stalk. Not sure why but they grab it all when done like that and gives it all a good airing. We always used to ted it first time with the wheel stalks in the top hole so that the machine is as low to the ground as is possible and with a shortish top link so that it is pointing forward. The latter can allso be acheived by using the top link hole on the machine that is designed to acheive that but we never bothered with messing about with that.

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    Re: HayBob

    Most important to check on the Haybob.....that the shafts for the wheels slide up and down freely, if it has been in the nettles they won’t. Vital for changing from tedding to rowing up.
    Also vital that the tines are in the correct sequence on the correct rotor.....alternate tines around the wheel.....and on the correct side. Easy for someone to pop a few tines on to fill up the spaces just to improve the look.
    Tines should also point upwards when parked....not essential but good.....small spring needs replacing...very fiddly.
    Gates need to be in good order, bottom of them become worn , need to be smooth to stop them pulling lumps along with you.
    As ever they work fantastically when the sun is shining...

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    Re: HayBob

    Quote Originally Posted by zaza View Post
    Firstly it all depends on how much haymaking you are planning to do. I used to bale for 4-5 customers who used to make between 50-70 acres each and they graduated to a Havbob after the Acrobat/Cock Pheasant/Wuffler days had run their course. I used to make about 40 acres for myself and with that and the hay that I made for other customers my best days were with a 6 star Centipede but we had to row up with an Acrobat and, like most machines, including a Haybob, if you send someone to do the job when they don't know how to use the particular machine then it can be a recipe for disaster.

    The Centipede could do 12 acres an hour if the going was O.K. but I found that when we went to Haybobs (and I only ever had PZ machines) it was less hassle teaching people how to use them properly to ted and row up. I expect that there will be some comments on here saying that Haybobs are a load of rubbish but it's all about using them the right way. I wrote a document once, which I still have somewhere, telling my chaps how I wanted them to use the Haybobs. I was doing the baling and it was important that I could get in and out in the shortest possible time and get on to the next job.

    The condition of the Haybob is more important than the model. I assume that it's going to be baled with a conventional baler ?
    It is a very small set-up I have. I was going to only be covering a few acres so while a baler would be nice I think it is quite an expense. To begin with was thinking of the haybob then manually baling it up until saved enough for a baler. Looking at what is out there it would be the same issue a lot of machines which have already seen a lot of usage so would it be becoming a bit of a money pit for a non commercial operation.

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    Re: HayBob

    Quote Originally Posted by john maddock View Post
    Forgot to say, the early models tended to crack where the top link mast joined the cross tube on which the rotors are mounted. Check.

    JV
    Thanks as I suspected a lot of the machinery in the lower price bracket is seeing rust so checking movement of tines etc. would be ideal. I will check this as well as the gates because some do look like they have been worn.

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    Re: HayBob

    Quote Originally Posted by Gee View Post
    Most important to check on the Haybob.....that the shafts for the wheels slide up and down freely, if it has been in the nettles they won’t. Vital for changing from tedding to rowing up.
    Also vital that the tines are in the correct sequence on the correct rotor.....alternate tines around the wheel.....and on the correct side. Easy for someone to pop a few tines on to fill up the spaces just to improve the look.
    Tines should also point upwards when parked....not essential but good.....small spring needs replacing...very fiddly.
    Gates need to be in good order, bottom of them become worn , need to be smooth to stop them pulling lumps along with you.
    As ever they work fantastically when the sun is shining...
    Thanks for the tips.

  10. #10
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    Re: HayBob

    Quote Originally Posted by Gee View Post
    Most important to check on the Haybob.....that the shafts for the wheels slide up and down freely, if it has been in the nettles they won’t. Vital for changing from tedding to rowing up.
    Also vital that the tines are in the correct sequence on the correct rotor.....alternate tines around the wheel.....and on the correct side. Easy for someone to pop a few tines on to fill up the spaces just to improve the look.
    Tines should also point upwards when parked....not essential but good.....small spring needs replacing...very fiddly.
    Gates need to be in good order, bottom of them become worn , need to be smooth to stop them pulling lumps along with you.
    As ever they work fantastically when the sun is shining...
    That is all very true and helpful advice. Also check if the crop divider is there. It works without it but better with it.The free up and down movement of the wheels is very important. I had a friend who bought an old Haybob and we had a bit of a job freeing the wheel stalks from their respective bushes.

    070520181917(small).jpg

    Also check on the tyres.Early ones came with 2 ply (may have been 4 ply) tyres but they need to be better than that.

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    Re: HayBob

    Quote Originally Posted by zaza View Post
    That is all very true and helpful advice. Also check if the crop divider is there. It works without it but better with it.The free up and down movement of the wheels is very important. I had a friend who bought an old Haybob and we had a bit of a job freeing the wheel stalks from their respective bushes.

    070520181917(small).jpg

    Also check on the tyres.Early ones came with 2 ply (may have been 4 ply) tyres but they need to be better than that.
    Thanks, I imagine the tyres have signs of wear in terms of ageing rather then distance travelled and no tread left.

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    Re: HayBob

    Quote Originally Posted by Kevee View Post
    Thanks, I imagine the tyres have signs of wear in terms of ageing rather then distance travelled and no tread left.
    Yes. Have a look at this machine. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/PZ-200-Ha...0AAOSwKJpe1i2R

    The left hand n/s tyre is an original, the right hand o/s tyre is a replacement. The early ones were ribbed like a 2wd front tractor tyre, the later machines were fitted with a better tyre which had a different tread. And notice the bottom of the gates as Gee mentioned. The bottom bars to both gates (that run along the ground) are missing completely. Nothing that can't be fixed but it would need to be done otherwise the hay would start to catch rather than fly past where the bottom bend should be . At least the above machine has got a decent PTO guard and the crop divider as well as the stand.

    EDIT. Why not find something that you like the look of and is near enough to you and gives us the link and we (me !!) will pass an opinion ?

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    Re: HayBob

    Quote Originally Posted by zaza View Post
    Yes. Have a look at this machine. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/PZ-200-Ha...0AAOSwKJpe1i2R

    The left hand n/s tyre is an original, the right hand o/s tyre is a replacement. The early ones were ribbed like a 2wd front tractor tyre, the later machines were fitted with a better tyre which had a different tread. And notice the bottom of the gates as Gee mentioned. The bottom bars to both gates (that run along the ground) are missing completely. Nothing that can't be fixed but it would need to be done otherwise the hay would start to catch rather than fly past where the bottom bend should be . At least the above machine has got a decent PTO guard and the crop divider as well as the stand.

    EDIT. Why not find something that you like the look of and is near enough to you and gives us the link and we (me !!) will pass an opinion ?
    Judging by the string round the tines, it looks like all the return springs need replacing too.

    Another note, all the ones I've ever seen working had a rope threaded through the tines so that when one inevitably breaks you don't lose it in the crop.

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    Re: HayBob

    Quote Originally Posted by Paw View Post
    Judging by the string round the tines, it looks like all the return springs need replacing too.

    Another note, all the ones I've ever seen working had a rope threaded through the tines so that when one inevitably breaks you don't lose it in the crop.
    Yes, we always used the rope technique to catch any broken tines. Like this one : https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Farm-Zwee...YAAOSwg6de1A3n Saves taking a chunk out of the knives in the baler.

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    Re: HayBob

    Quote Originally Posted by zaza View Post
    That is all very true and helpful advice. Also check if the crop divider is there. It works without it but better with it.The free up and down movement of the wheels is very important. I had a friend who bought an old Haybob and we had a bit of a job freeing the wheel stalks from their respective bushes.

    070520181917(small).jpg

    Also check on the tyres.Early ones came with 2 ply (may have been 4 ply) tyres but they need to be better than that.
    Found some ....pretty sure they were 8 ply tyres that size similar pattern to the ones in the picture.....keep them inflated pretty hard....they got around a lot of the puncture problems.
    Original ribbed pattern...etc were rubbish at resting punctures.

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    Re: HayBob

    Quote Originally Posted by Gee View Post
    Found some ....pretty sure they were 8 ply tyres that size similar pattern to the ones in the picture.....keep them inflated pretty hard....they got around a lot of the puncture problems.
    Original ribbed pattern...etc were rubbish at resting punctures.
    Completely agree. We fitted all our Haybobs with tyres as in the link and yes, I think they were 8 ply. Of course tyres get tired (sorry !!! ) and after a few years and many many miles, sometimes on customer's fields that are, shall we say, resembling a tank training course, they just give up the struggle. Sod's Law says that it always happens when it is being used to row up some lovely hay when rain is iminent. That's when you need decent hydraulics on the tractor so that the machine can be "carried" rather then relying on the depth wheels.

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    Re: HayBob

    Everything about the 300 is beefed up a bit especially that problem headstock cracking area and the wheels/tyres.
    For a smaller area the smaller version would probably be OK, it will be annoying if it can't quite take two (or one bigger) mower width.
    Here we do 40-50 acres for hay and the 300 is just about feasible for that sort of area, usually cut in 2 or 3 batches.
    Mind the first one we had was the 275 and that was better than various fragile things we had before (New Holland )

    Haybobs are arguably still the best single machine to do an OK job of spreading and rowing up, while being able to take considerable abuse within reason.

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    Re: HayBob

    Quote Originally Posted by 4wd View Post
    Haybobs are arguably still the best single machine to do an OK job of spreading and rowing up, while being able to take considerable abuse within reason.
    I still think they are a very good machine but then I learned my haymaking as mentioned before on Cock Pheasants, Wufflers, Acrobats, even a Dickie on one place. But, like everything else, it has to be used properly. An Acrobat was quite a decent bit of kit when we were mowing with cutter bars but the operator had to think about what they were doing. I had one customer who didn't own anything else and when he had been through a crop turning it about 4 times and then rowed it up the swath was like a length of rope.

    Same with the Haybob. I always asked my chaps to go round the outside of the field first and anti-clockwise with the o/s rotor tines in the rowing up position with the o/s gate in the rowing up hole. That way you got the stuff away from the hedge because once it's been chucked into the hedge bottom you can't get it out again. If you go anti-clockwise very often you can go round the corners instead of having to lift and reverse but if it was a 90 degree or less corner then shove the bonnet right up as far as you can into the corner and get the grass out into the field as far as you can.

    Sorry, I'm a bit nerdy about the way hay is worked and especially rowed up. If you've got say 5 places to go to with the baler in a day then you don't want some clown who has made such a b**ls-up that you have to loop on the corners if they have been working it round and round ! Remember when cutter bar nowers were used grass was mowed round and round and I had some customers who just wouldn't change from that. The first year I had the Centipede I had one customer who went beserk when he saw that it wasn't in rows anymore after I had tedded it. I thought we were going to part company but he came round to my way of thinking eventually.
    Last edited by zaza; 04-06-20 at 08:25 PM.

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    Re: HayBob

    Wow...a Dickie Turner!
    Seem to Remember seeing some spare new tines for a Dickie a year or so ago.....
    From what I remember they could fairly go through the tines with an enthusiastic but inexperienced operator.

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    Re: HayBob

    Quote Originally Posted by Gee View Post
    Wow...a Dickie Turner!
    Seem to Remember seeing some spare new tines for a Dickie a year or so ago.....
    From what I remember they could fairly go through the tines with an enthusiastic but inexperienced operator.
    That is very true. But that particular customer did all the driving himself and he was as tight as a tick and hated having to spend money. I used to send the hay bills out around August time and one year he hadn't paid his bill so just before Christmas time I went and had a chat with him. He was in the cowshed milking his dozen or so cows and so I asked him, very politely, if there was any chance of some money and he turned round to me quite startled and said that he had only recently started to feed the hay that I had baled that year !!

    Silly me, I hadn't realised that the cows had to eat the hay before I got paid for baling it ! But he was a lovely old character. He was telling me one day about a place where "courting couples" used to go and park up in one of his gateways and he had found a condom hung up on a holly bush after it had obviously been thrown out of a vehicle. Then he said to me "he aint a mucher though" meaning that he thought that the culprit was lacking in something. When I asked him why he said "because there was only 3 drops inside the thing and 2 of them was p1$$"
    Last edited by zaza; 05-06-20 at 12:44 PM.

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    Re: HayBob

    Quote Originally Posted by zaza View Post
    Yes. Have a look at this machine. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/PZ-200-Ha...0AAOSwKJpe1i2R

    The left hand n/s tyre is an original, the right hand o/s tyre is a replacement. The early ones were ribbed like a 2wd front tractor tyre, the later machines were fitted with a better tyre which had a different tread. And notice the bottom of the gates as Gee mentioned. The bottom bars to both gates (that run along the ground) are missing completely. Nothing that can't be fixed but it would need to be done otherwise the hay would start to catch rather than fly past where the bottom bend should be . At least the above machine has got a decent PTO guard and the crop divider as well as the stand.

    EDIT. Why not find something that you like the look of and is near enough to you and gives us the link and we (me !!) will pass an opinion ?
    Thanks, I will keep a look out and post on here, I imagine it will be via. ebay seems to be where most are advertised.

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    Re: HayBob

    Quote Originally Posted by zaza View Post
    Yes. Have a look at this machine. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/PZ-200-Ha...0AAOSwKJpe1i2R

    The left hand n/s tyre is an original, the right hand o/s tyre is a replacement. The early ones were ribbed like a 2wd front tractor tyre, the later machines were fitted with a better tyre which had a different tread. And notice the bottom of the gates as Gee mentioned. The bottom bars to both gates (that run along the ground) are missing completely. Nothing that can't be fixed but it would need to be done otherwise the hay would start to catch rather than fly past where the bottom bend should be . At least the above machine has got a decent PTO guard and the crop divider as well as the stand.

    EDIT. Why not find something that you like the look of and is near enough to you and gives us the link and we (me !!) will pass an opinion ?

    I will do thanks, I imagine it will be off ebay, seems to be the best source.

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    Re: HayBob

    Quote Originally Posted by Paw View Post
    Judging by the string round the tines, it looks like all the return springs need replacing too.

    Another note, all the ones I've ever seen working had a rope threaded through the tines so that when one inevitably breaks you don't lose it in the crop.
    That is a very good point, I had not thought of that before. Wow so much real world advice out there :-)

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    Re: HayBob

    Quote Originally Posted by 4wd View Post
    Everything about the 300 is beefed up a bit especially that problem headstock cracking area and the wheels/tyres.
    For a smaller area the smaller version would probably be OK, it will be annoying if it can't quite take two (or one bigger) mower width.
    Here we do 40-50 acres for hay and the 300 is just about feasible for that sort of area, usually cut in 2 or 3 batches.
    Mind the first one we had was the 275 and that was better than various fragile things we had before (New Holland )

    Haybobs are arguably still the best single machine to do an OK job of spreading and rowing up, while being able to take considerable abuse within reason.
    I had seen a few other makes out there and the general opinion seemed to be that although these were old they still did a better job for small owner use. I did see one with plastic discs that how shall I put it no longer round. Are they the New Holland ones?

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    Re: HayBob

    To be honest I would stick with PZ. You can get all the spares such as tines, springs, tine carriers, etc. easily. I have even seen s/h drive gears on eBay. You really want to see it on a tractor & in gear and as others have said, take a good look at the headstock if it's an early one. It ought to have a stand and a crop divider and decent gates. If any of those are rough or missing then it hasn't had a very good home. And don't forget the P.T.O. shaft. Check the UJs and please please make sure it has a guard.

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    Re: HayBob

    Quote Originally Posted by zaza View Post
    . . . snip . . . and please please make sure it has a guard.
    two thumbs up

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