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Thread: Bio digester fuel

  1. #1
    A Trebor
    Guest

    Bio digester fuel

    Question on behalf of a friend of a friend . If he wanted to buy maize to add to a Bio digester would he be able to and if so at what sort of cost(lincs/yorkshire border area).

  2. #2
    RGT
    Guest

    Re: Bio digester fuel

    They are growing different varieties of maize specially for Bio Gas ? but guess all the same?

    Cost will be going rate as per feed I would have thought ?

    If weather like this will it ever come to anything and will you ever be able to harvest it??

  3. #3
    dalos
    Guest

    Re: Bio digester fuel

    What are the inheritance tax implications of growing crops for fuel on your land that you rent out, as i was speaking to a consultant that said it was a grey area and that it could have implications on the land being agricultural or comercial.
    That could make land quite expensive for biodigesters.

  4. #4
    A Trebor
    Guest

    Re: Bio digester fuel

    Quote Originally Posted by RGT View Post
    They are growing different varieties of maize specially for Bio Gas ? but guess all the same?

    Cost will be going rate as per feed I would have thought ?

    If weather like this will it ever come to anything and will you ever be able to harvest it??
    And what is that?

  5. #5
    RGT
    Guest

    Re: Bio digester fuel

    what ever you can get at that time of play????

  6. #6
    vinnie123
    Guest

    Re: Bio digester fuel

    35quid per ton out of clamp in dorset this week

  7. #7
    Mayo
    Guest

    Re: Bio digester fuel

    The varieties of maize for biomass are subtly different, no consideration for D value at all, just out and out biomass yield. Not what the dairy farmer wants.

  8. #8
    Clive
    Guest

    Re: Bio digester fuel

    Think Maize has a great future on arable farms for use in AD plants

    It's has potential to be the spring break crop we could really do with to sort out the poor rotations that most are forced by economics to use

    UK's largest AD plant just up the road from me but so far they have been trying (not over successfully i'm told) to just run it on food waste which of course they get paid to take rather than pay to bring in

    Hope they decide to use Maize sometime soon !!

    It's the perfect storm really - they can afford to pay good money for the crop and the digestate out need land to spread it on

  9. #9
    Mayo
    Guest

    Re: Bio digester fuel

    Agree, maize will be an excellent break crop and of course an opportunity to use up a lot of slurry and fym or even sewage sludge if its only going in a digester. That said there are other biomass crops about, what about forage rye?

  10. #10
    the son
    Guest

    Re: Bio digester fuel

    We are about to start construction of digester, and are in the second year of maize growing.

    I realise we have had two difficlut maize seasons, but I do not think that maize is going to be a suitable fuel for our plant, I will be growing ryegrass next year as it will provide a greater fresh weight yield for less cost (on my farm).

    What is forage rye? Do you cut like ryegrass or is it just a single cut crop?

  11. #11
    RGT
    Guest

    Re: Bio digester fuel

    How are you going to top up keep digester going then?

    Maize and silage just one crop -usually once a year??

    You got to fill and remove digestate all the time to get the most of an AD plant??

  12. #12
    Mayo
    Guest

    Re: Bio digester fuel

    There is nothing to stop you growing just grass of course, but forage rye is a beast of a plant that can grow very tall, Barleycorn posted pictures of hist being cut it was like maize in terms of height. One of the most bad ass varieties is called 'Bonfire'. D value of course goes out the window once its huge and gone ot seed but for outright biomass you can't go wrong. Cut directly with wholecrop header or if you are brave, mow it.

    AD plants are like cows; need to be fed everyday and liquid/solid fraction regularly cleaned out. Farm I know of with one eats 14t of silage and manure a day and thats a baby one. Chap I was speaking to last week is about to work with a plant that consumes 100t of material a day- rather a lot of moves with a wheeled loader.

    Liquid fraction from AD plant is as thin as dirty water from a dairy unit and can be pumped with umbilical etc readily.

  13. #13
    Steakeater
    Guest

    Re: Bio digester fuel

    Is clover any use in an AD plant?

    Was just thinking with regards to a clover ryegrass mix to cut down nitrogen use?

  14. #14
    Mayo
    Guest

    Re: Bio digester fuel

    Any kind of biomass is suitable for use in an AD plant basically, so clover would work, yes. You could theoretically run them on the left overs from abattoirs, food waste, anything that will biodegrade, anything bacteria can eat.

    The problem is that running them on pure sewage or manure etc won't provide the maximum methane yield, you need to add green material to the mixture to get the maximum gain.

    The idea is you make natural gas from waste which would otherwise be dumped. Of course you get free fertiliser and solids, too.

    The way to really make AD plants pay is to find a way to use the waste heat from the engine making the power- this is a huge engine in a box, if you can take the heat away and heat homes with it, or just your swimming pool, you're getting heat for free.

  15. #15
    Feldspar
    Guest

    Re: Bio digester fuel

    Quote Originally Posted by Clive View Post
    Think Maize has a great future on arable farms for use in AD plants

    It's has potential to be the spring break crop we could really do with to sort out the poor rotations that most are forced by economics to use

    UK's largest AD plant just up the road from me but so far they have been trying (not over successfully i'm told) to just run it on food waste which of course they get paid to take rather than pay to bring in

    Hope they decide to use Maize sometime soon !!

    It's the perfect storm really - they can afford to pay good money for the crop and the digestate out need land to spread it on
    Is the fact that the digestate is produced anaerobically a disadvantage (versus aerobically) from a fertility POV?

  16. #16
    Barleycorn
    Guest

    Re: Bio digester fuel

    Quote Originally Posted by Feldspar View Post
    Is the fact that the digestate is produced anaerobically a disadvantage (versus aerobically) from a fertility POV?
    The anaerobic digestate can be aerobically composted when it comes out of the machine, so could be a useful fertiliser.

  17. #17
    Mayo
    Guest

    Re: Bio digester fuel

    I don't see the advantage in composting something that has already been 'eaten'? Shouldn't make any difference to the end nutrient value either, whether eaten by bugs that like oxygen or not.

    From the plants I have seen the AD separated solids are very friable and almost like compost. Certainly they are stackable and would be easier to spread and more consistent than fym etc.

    Barleycorn- can you explain about that rye you grew, you get more than one cut?

  18. #18
    trebor07
    Guest

    Re: Bio digester fuel

    Grass only digesters are very difficult to keep running efficiently.
    Just put grass in a bucket of water. You will get the idea !!

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