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Thread: Poached pastures

  1. #1
    4wd
    Guest

    Poached pastures

    I keep thinking it would be nice to go in with a roller to flatten down some of these areas which have cow footprints inches deep, obviously when it is dry enough on top.
    Is that going to be a bad thing?
    Will they eventually repair and level themselves over winter?

  2. #2
    chips
    Guest

    Re: Poached pastures

    maybe an aerator would do a better job for the soil life

  3. #3
    besty
    Guest

    Re: Poached pastures

    Yea I'm with Chips on this one. An aerator would be the tool to improve the soil structure. I feel a roller will provide more of a cosmetic improvement without any major benefits of improving the pasture.

  4. #4
    Joules
    Guest

    Re: Poached pastures

    yeah a rolller won't remove the problem - compaction - just make it look better and mean you're less likely to twist your ankle if it ever dries out enough for you to walk on it rather than through it

  5. #5
    The ruminant
    Guest

    Re: Poached pastures

    I also think rolling is a bad idea. The part that is compacted is the bit where the hoof pressed down. The bit that isn't compacted is the raised soil round the sides of the hoofprint. Rolling will only compact the uncompacted bits. If you've got lots of worms, they will sort it out for you.

    However, if you're going to cut the fields for silage, there's an increased risk of soil compaction from a poached pasture, so rolling may have some benefit from that point of view.

  6. #6
    tractorbob
    Guest

    Re: Poached pastures

    IMO you need to lift and put back down to solve compaction and poaching.


  7. #7
    multi power
    Guest

    Re: Poached pastures

    Quote Originally Posted by tractorbob View Post
    IMO you need to lift and put back down to solve compaction and poaching.

    that looks a good bit of kit, but worms are free

  8. #8
    dgw
    Guest

    Re: Poached pastures

    If conditions are right then a heavy roller has got to be a good idea to help get rid of some of the poaching and help smooth the land out a little. However it may also be as well to do as others have said and aerate/subsoil afterwards to alleviate the compaction of both poaching and rolling. Timing these jobs correctly should do the land a lot of good.

  9. #9
    besty
    Guest

    Re: Poached pastures

    Quote Originally Posted by dgw View Post
    If conditions are right then a heavy roller has got to be a good idea to help get rid of some of the poaching and help smooth the land out a little. However it may also be as well to do as others have said and aerate/subsoil afterwards to alleviate the compaction of both poaching and rolling. Timing these jobs correctly should do the land a lot of good.
    +1. This is arguably the most important bit.

  10. #10
    Toshak
    Guest

    Re: Poached pastures

    Timing is everything. Pulling a chain harrow, when the top of the ground is dryish, breaks up the tufts sitting above the general field surface. If it can be done in late autumn, early winter, and left to nature till next spring, you will be back to a good surface again. Winter rains and frosts, will do the rolling

  11. #11
    Marches Farmer
    Guest

    Re: Poached pastures

    On the other hand you could wait until it rains hard again and let Nature do the job. The area where we cut turf and held a Jubilee beacon is now as flat as a billiard table. Even the worms are drowning around here!

  12. #12
    Big Vern
    Guest

    Re: Poached pastures

    Quote Originally Posted by 4wd View Post
    I keep thinking it would be nice to go in with a roller to flatten down some of these areas which have cow footprints inches deep, obviously when it is dry enough on top.
    Is that going to be a bad thing?
    Will they eventually repair and level themselves over winter?
    if we can scrounge it our worst bits of grass..(all of the pastures) will have a visit from a neighbours slitter/arator then will get rolled with th cambrige ring rollers looks horrible after but does a far better ob than a flat

  13. #13
    organic guy
    Guest

    Re: Poached pastures

    slitter as soon as conditions allow, again when it is nearly too hard to get it in ground, sub soiler in autumn if it dries enough, mole plough next year to get the drains going again.
    have I missed anything?
    Yes,I've done more damage than 20 years put together but probably no worse than my neighbour, who out winters on unsuitable soils, does every year.

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