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Thread: French Translator Required!

  1. #1
    155tm
    Guest

    French Translator Required!

    One of our fellow forum members has appeared in the press recently, there is just one small problem with the article........






    My schoolboy French is merde, but I like the method of soil sampling!

  2. #2
    Tim Fr
    Guest

    Re: French Translator Required!

    How quick to you want it translated, I can do it but we are in the middle of harvest here. Could do it in a couple of weeks or if it rains sooner but forecast is dry
    Tim (France)

  3. #3
    155tm
    Guest

    Re: French Translator Required!

    There is no rush Tim, thank you for your reply. I posted it up really for others to see and to spark some discussion.

    The article keeps mentioning water and from talking to Nicolas (his english is excellent) I am guessing the article is advocating the addition of organic matter to improve the moisture holding capacity and structure of the soil? I thought he was using cover crops too, but my schoolboy french can't find that bit!

  4. #4
    Claas Grass
    Guest

    Re: French Translator Required!

    Probably stating the obvious but if the article is on the internet could google translate do it for you or did you scan the article

  5. #5
    4wd
    Guest

    Re: French Translator Required!

    You could still get it into a text form with OCR as used by scanners.
    Google translate is usually OKish until you get into more technical terms (like in that article!)
    My French is good enough to get the gist but I wouldn't want to attempt a translation as various words I'm guessing (like google).

  6. #6
    Tim Fr
    Guest

    Re: French Translator Required!

    155tm, its drizzling at the moment son will translate tonight.

    Dont trust GOOGLE any more since we had a German family staying at our B&B. We have a set of rules in English & French and thought it would be good to have German also. Amongst our rules is no smoking thankfully the son spoke fluent English and compared the Googled German to our English rules. Google translated no smoking to Smoking is very welcome

  7. #7
    TM135
    Guest

    Re: French Translator Required!

    155TM i suspect you know my answer to your problem

  8. #8
    Tim Fr
    Guest

    Re: French Translator Required!

    This is the best I have come up with quickly;

    Note; TCS normally means min till and some times DD, I am translating as min till.

    In developing min till ND is making the most of water management. There are many agricultural benefits; soil structure higher surface OM along with biological soil life.

    I am raising water retention as a result of min till.

    ND has questioned the sustainability of his system in a the economic future. Soil profiles have shown structural problems caused by different and repetitive tools used. He has attended numerous meetings to evolve his system. “I have made many errors and will still make more” He grows 180ha of similar soil types of which irrigation is notenvisaged.

    In optimizing water retention ND is concentrating on soil structure. In effect ploughing has caused problems for roots and water to penetrate the plough pan. Min till has improved soil structure, facilitating crop planting but also water penetration. The more vigorous roots are able to reach water deeper down and potentially increase usable water For ND machine choice is most important “ using a chisel plough caused a pan after 3 to 4 years where as strip till has caused fissuring deep down with out compaction . Water / air exchanges is improved”

    Introducing spring crops.
    ND has introduced maze into his rotation. “ Growing WW rape has caused weed problems, introducing spring crops has helped break the weed cycle” But it is not a secret that maze uses a lot of water, particularly in the periods when water is rather scarce. The rotation has been thought out to overcome this restraint in exploiting to the maximum soil reserves. “ I have been alternating winter & spring crops, introducing legumes for there nitrogen fixing benefits. Thus maze helps OM, beans nitrogen & rape helps keep grass weeds a bay. Otherwise DD benefits in not leaving the soil bare, limiting evaporation. The following crops develop rapidly. A small detail there is no need for a cover crop except for ww maize. The presence of a cover creates a transition limiting evaporation.
    The OM stocks 80% water & feed earth worms.
    The management of OM in optimising water resources. In effect the level of OM and decomposing debris serves to soak up water. The OM is similar to peat in stocking 80% water. In this system the OM is never incorporated by ploughing. Thus it is always on the surface. For ND OM management is of up most importance. “ it is necessary to make the soil living without disturbing the layers, leaving the worms & bacteria to work.
    In effect many galleries are made b the worms creating a granular soil that also helps water storage. The worms come to the surface (normally at night) to draw down debris to lower levels. We can measure this activity by the presence of worm casts. Remembering that a tonne of worms can decompose 250 tonnes of soil per year, estimations of 1 to 3 tonnes of worms per Ha. The worms work in place of us insist ND. The galleries permit a better aeration and drainage. “ its necessary for the soil to come out for the water to enter. He no longer ploughs and the soil has gone back to a balance. No ploughing has permitted to leave surface OM & there for favourise soil life.In DD the previous crops roots maintain soil structure. The OM acts as a sponge. When it rains water is absorbed and is kept in the mulch on the surface. Another non negotiable argument is on soil where erosion is a problem. For ND the change to DD has considerably improved his soil structure and by consequence optimise water resources notably for maze. DD is little exploited today but will be a good management

  9. #9
    155tm
    Guest

    Re: French Translator Required!

    Thank you Tim!

    I had got the general idea about the water and the organic matter, my french surprises me! I don't think we could make maize work in the uk, not quite enough heat units during the growing season and the supposed fusarium risk in the following wheat? He has increased the different types of crops grown and added spring croping to return a wider range of residues to the soil. More about his methods of establishment would be interesting, he does mention strip till briefly.

    Reading through your translation and the original, I can pick out words now and guess what their translation is, printemps = spring etc, every day is a school day!!!

    Thanks

  10. #10
    Tim Fr
    Guest

    Re: French Translator Required!

    Quote Originally Posted by 155tm View Post
    Thank you Tim!

    I had got the general idea about the water and the organic matter, my french surprises me! I don't think we could make maize work in the uk, not quite enough heat units during the growing season and the supposed fusarium risk in the following wheat? He has increased the different types of crops grown and added spring croping to return a wider range of residues to the soil. More about his methods of establishment would be interesting, he does mention strip till briefly.

    Reading through your translation and the original, I can pick out words now and guess what their translation is, printemps = spring etc, every day is a school day!!!

    Thanks
    check out what james has to say about short growing season maze http://farmingforum.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=32644 may be interesting in the UK

  11. #11
    combineguy
    Guest

    Re: French Translator Required!

    Water holding capacity of no tilled ground is quite amazing

    Saw one example recently where someone cut a bottle (like a 600ml coke bottle) filled it with soil from both non tilled and fully tilled ground, and added water to it. If York-th is around he perhaps could describe it better.

    It was like chalk and cheese the no tilled ground could sustain 3 cups of water while the tilled ground could only hold 1 cup of water before it started to run out, and it took quite a bit of soil with it. While the water coming out of the no tilled ground was just dirty water with very little sediment in it. They call it the 25p test (as you get 25p per bottle recycled)

  12. #12
    The ruminant
    Guest

    Re: French Translator Required!

    Quote Originally Posted by combineguy View Post
    Water holding capacity of no tilled ground is quite amazing

    Saw one example recently where someone cut a bottle (like a 600ml coke bottle) filled it with soil from both non tilled and fully tilled ground, and added water to it. If York-th is around he perhaps could describe it better.

    It was like chalk and cheese the no tilled ground could sustain 3 cups of water while the tilled ground could only hold 1 cup of water before it started to run out, and it took quite a bit of soil with it. While the water coming out of the no tilled ground was just dirty water with very little sediment in it. They call it the 25p test (as you get 25p per bottle recycled)
    Here's a link to a very similar demonstration called the 'slake test'
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CEOyC_tGH64
    I could watch it again and again!

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