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Thread: Warwickshire Stubble Stomp update

  1. #1
    Seat Right Back
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    Warwickshire Stubble Stomp update

    Combine went into the barley a couple of weeks ago , a bit late really but we were messing around with rape and the weather wasnt / isnt playing ball with us at the moment .

    So ,,,,, first thing which became very apparent is that blackgrass had more effect on yield than anything else I did in the field , but I dont need to tell you that do I , as the patch of blackgrass covered in bits and pieces in 3 of the plots it was impossible to weigh each plot as we had wished to , there would of been to much trampling around with combine turning short and going back to finish of so that was out of the question ,
    In the end the whole of the field averaged out at just over that much quoted figure of 3 ton / acre [62 cwt/ acre], going by combine weigher which had been callibrated in that field ,
    the bit with the blackgrass in was running at around 2 T/acre so that should tell you that the good bit was running fairly well

    There was nothing scientific in the way I measured the next yields and there is no way it would stand up in court and I accept that but it was really the only way open to me , so when I was cutting with a full header with NO tramlines going up the front I kept on jotting down figures every few seconds to try and gauge a feeling for yield

    Kuhn SD 3.7 ton / acre

    Claydon 3.4 ton /acre

    Mzuri 3.4 ton /acre

    Sumo 3.5 ton / acre

    so as said not 100% scientific but I think I got it fairly well

    comments ,
    If I had got of my arse and cut it in the nice spell a couple of weeks earlier then both Claydon and Mzuri would of been better , we had quite a hail storm 4 days previous next door crop of rape must of had 1/3 ton / acre knocked out , such is life, any way the hail took the brackled barley over and forced it down through the wide rows , so when combine came along the knife cuth the heads off , such is life and it is probably just one of those things for this year
    Combine traveled well on the land , still left wheeling between 2 and 4 inches deep but at least it isnt destroyed like some of the other fields
    So not a lot between any of the drills , what have I learnt so far , well when the Kuhn started putting the barley in I thought that I had gone of my rocker , hairpinning , seed to deep , seed to shallow , seed on the surface but with in 7 days we could see that it was up and away and you had to just forget those bits of rows which didnt make it

    Now im just waiting to get some wheat cut , this block of land is all destined to go into rape , the seed that I had ordered I cancelled a week or so ago , ground needs to dry up before anything is done ,

    We had Simon Draper and Crops magazine looking around last week looking at doing an article on ''What the flippin hell do I do now '' although Im sure the lovely Louise will think of a better heading .

    Since then we have tipped out another inch out of the rain gauge and due for a load more tommorrow

    We need a dry month please

  2. #2
    Badshot
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    Re: Warwickshire Stubble Stomp update

    So would it be fair to say that had the heads not been cut off there would have been sod all difference in yield between the lot?

  3. #3
    Seat Right Back
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    Re: Warwickshire Stubble Stomp update

    Quote Originally Posted by Badshot View Post
    So would it be fair to say that had the heads not been cut off there would have been sod all difference in yield between the lot?
    errrr . yup

  4. #4
    jonnieboy
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    Re: Warwickshire Stubble Stomp update

    All those cheque books were hovering waiting for the word

    and its a draw

    back on the fence everyone

  5. #5
    Enry
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    Re: Warwickshire Stubble Stomp update

    Quote Originally Posted by jonnieboy View Post
    All those cheque books were hovering waiting for the word

    and its a draw

    back on the fence everyone
    SRB playing a canny game....a dead heat on barley.....now he's waiting for the big money offers before declaring that drill X has produced 12t/ha in wheat against an average of 6t/ha.....

  6. #6
    honest john
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    Re: Warwickshire Stubble Stomp update

    I have noticed this year that the thiner crappy areas have the best yeilds.
    Less straw more corn.
    Is that why the Kuhn did a bit better ?

  7. #7
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    Re: Warwickshire Stubble Stomp update

    to be fair on the barley field all the plots looked fair all year round , last time through with Simon and crowd we generaly put our money on the sumo

    the wheat field was a different ball game , but allas with the wheat doing what it has done this year will we see anything interesting , probably not now

  8. #8
    Badshot
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    Re: Warwickshire Stubble Stomp update

    So is there any comparison available for your 'normal' farm practice SRB?

  9. #9
    Seat Right Back
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    Re: Warwickshire Stubble Stomp update

    everything ran about the same , main yield sapper was blackgrass but that was only in the odd place ,

  10. #10
    Badshot
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    Re: Warwickshire Stubble Stomp update

    Keep us updated please, I have a theory that DD'd wheat has better bushel weight for some reason (no evidence to back that up, just a hunch)

  11. #11
    Enry
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    Re: Warwickshire Stubble Stomp update

    this year will surely be a reminder that cost control is always important, and that going for gold doesnt always pay off.....lot of expensive crops will leave a big loss this time

  12. #12
    foxbox
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    Re: Warwickshire Stubble Stomp update

    Quote Originally Posted by Badshot View Post
    Keep us updated please, I have a theory that DD'd wheat has better bushel weight for some reason (no evidence to back that up, just a hunch)
    We've cut 50 acres of Claydon drilled wheat and around 30 acres of min tilled stuff so far, there doesn't appear to be a difference in specific weights or yields between the two this year on our farm. In fact the only difference between the two that we have seen is the way the ground travels, the Claydon land is barely taking a cleat mark from the combine whereas the min till is threatening to eat loaded trailers etc. The 6 fields cut have comparable soil types, drainage systems etc so that it appears to be down to the soil structure alone.

  13. #13
    Badshot
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    Re: Warwickshire Stubble Stomp update

    Quote Originally Posted by foxbox View Post
    We've cut 50 acres of Claydon drilled wheat and around 30 acres of min tilled stuff so far, there doesn't appear to be a difference in specific weights or yields between the two this year on our farm. In fact the only difference between the two that we have seen is the way the ground travels, the Claydon land is barely taking a cleat mark from the combine whereas the min till is threatening to eat loaded trailers etc. The 6 fields cut have comparable soil types, drainage systems etc so that it appears to be down to the soil structure alone.
    That's buggered my theory then:lolk:

  14. #14
    foxbox
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    Re: Warwickshire Stubble Stomp update

    Quote Originally Posted by Badshot View Post
    That's buggered my theory then:lolk:
    It's not a normal year though if that gives you wriggle room for another 12 months!!

    It's such a shame that the weather has been so poor since April, I've never seen such potential in our crops before and looking over the hedge it still looks like it could be a cracking crop until you take the combine in. I was really hoping to be able to compare strip till against min till yield wise but I don't think the results will be meaningful now.

  15. #15
    Badshot
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    Re: Warwickshire Stubble Stomp update

    To be honest the one thing I am learning from all this is that it doesn't make a s**t's worth of difference how you get the seed in the ground, the weather has more influence than anything else. However if you can see other benefits like travelling better and maybe sooner, less time spent on each acre and countless others then maybe you will make a success of it because you want it to work, not because it should work if that makes sense.

  16. #16
    Willscale
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    Re: Warwickshire Stubble Stomp update

    Quote Originally Posted by foxbox View Post
    We've cut 50 acres of Claydon drilled wheat and around 30 acres of min tilled stuff so far, there doesn't appear to be a difference in specific weights or yields between the two this year on our farm. In fact the only difference between the two that we have seen is the way the ground travels, the Claydon land is barely taking a cleat mark from the combine whereas the min till is threatening to eat loaded trailers etc. The 6 fields cut have comparable soil types, drainage systems etc so that it appears to be down to the soil structure alone.
    I agree. The difference between tilling just a few inches and not at all is quite significant even if from the tractor seat it feels like it shouldn't make any difference. Because soil structure etc is built from the top down (because the oxygen is on the top) whenever you till there will always be consequences for soil structure and its ability to hold traffic, infiltrate water, feed worms etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by Badshot View Post
    To be honest the one thing I am learning from all this is that it doesn't make a s**t's worth of difference how you get the seed in the ground, the weather has more influence than anything else. However if you can see other benefits like travelling better and maybe sooner, less time spent on each acre and countless others then maybe you will make a success of it because you want it to work, not because it should work if that makes sense.
    I see as sort of set of proven management rules or as Simon Chiles sometimes says "snakes and ladders" - you do something and you either go down a snake or up a ladder depending on what decision you make - and sometimes you have to go down the snake if weather, economics etc dictate. But I don't think I agree that is doesn't matter how you get the seed in - I think over time it gets more interesting as if you want to "progress" your system you will start to want to look at other stuff be it CTF, low hp, less herbicides, less soil movement, cover crops etc, tyres, stripper headers, rotations etc

  17. #17
    Kentish_Andy
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    Re: Warwickshire Stubble Stomp update

    Quote Originally Posted by Badshot View Post
    To be honest the one thing I am learning from all this is that it doesn't make a s**t's worth of difference how you get the seed in the ground, the weather has more influence than anything else. However if you can see other benefits like travelling better and maybe sooner, less time spent on each acre and countless others then maybe you will make a success of it because you want it to work, not because it should work if that makes sense.
    Not sure that is true. For all those people that came around our farm this year, you would have seen that we had a side by side comparison of claydon drilled wheat and JD750a drilled wheat. All drilled on the same day and received all the same inputs. The Claydon yielded 9.8t/ha and the JD750a yielded 10.8t/ha. These were two 0.5ha plots. As said by SRB this is not scientific, randomised or repeated experiment and so should be taken as such. Though I must say the effect was significant. You could see it clearly on the yield meter and when i look at the yield map I expect to see a straight line between the two. The only explanation I can give is that the spatial distribution of the seed drilled by the 750a was superior to the Claydon which is banded. The results could be different next year but I wont know as all my wheat will be drilled with the 750a!

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