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Thread: Lely Phesant's

  1. #1
    eric_t
    Guest

    Lely Phesant's

    Its the wrong time, and the wrong weather for talking about haymaking really, but anyway...

    Lely Cock Phesants, I read somewhere, probably on the BFF, that Lely Phesants were the worst haymaking implements ever invented...

    Were they really? What made them so bad?


  2. #2
    Howard_S
    Guest

    Re: Lely Phesant's

    Think you need one for your collection E!!!!

  3. #3
    tonym
    Guest

    Re: Lely Phesant's

    It may seem that way 50 years later but in their day they were as good as it got to fluff up your hay and undo the knots and lumps made by the Vicon Acrobat which itself was an improvement on the old side delivery rake. I think it is called progress.

  4. #4
    eric_t
    Guest

    Re: Lely Phesant's

    Quote Originally Posted by Howard_S View Post
    Think you need one for your collection E!!!!
    Plenty of Lely stuff here thank you... If a Gemini Hay turner turned up though i'd be interested...


  5. #5
    Howard_S
    Guest

    Re: Lely Phesant's

    Quote Originally Posted by eric_t View Post
    Plenty of Lely stuff here thank you... If a Gemini Hay turner turned up though i'd be interested...

    Can't have too much of a good (or bad) thing............

  6. #6
    eric_t
    Guest

    Re: Lely Phesant's

    Quote Originally Posted by Howard_S View Post
    Can't have too much of a good (or bad) thing............
    Believe me you can...

  7. #7
    dgw
    Guest

    Re: Lely Phesant's

    Cock Pheasants were good machines for fluffing up two 5' rows as left by the old mowers. You could also move the rows over slightly IIRC by running the machine at a slight angle. They were normally used in the 'over the top' mode of tedding but could also have the gearbox put in reverse to kick the hay backwards.
    They were rather awkward and unstable machines to transport, especially on rough ground and over ruts etc; and in tangled crops and on headlands they weren't the best as they could not be lifted clear of the ground. They could thus easily wrap thick or tangled hay around the PTO shaft and the ends of the tedding rotor and belts etc. Okay in their day but the modern tedders are far better; no way I would want to go back from a Lely 600 to a Cock Pheasant!

  8. #8
    Richard
    Guest

    Re: Lely Phesant's

    We had a golden pheasant, it even had doors on the back to do 2 into 1... badly!... they could ted over the top or kickback underneath.. ok once set up but a pain to move around fields.

  9. #9
    joe soapy
    Guest

    Re: Lely Phesant's

    still have nightmares about changing the belts on cock pheasant

  10. #10
    Tha Ulsterscot
    Guest

    Re: Lely Phesant's

    Cock Pheasants can still have their uses, and will still do as good a job as modern machines to lift straw out of the stubble without incorperating soil stones and grass into the row. I got my straw with a Bamfords Whuffler, which can do the same job behind a small combine.

  11. #11
    peasantman
    Guest

    Re: Lely Phesant's

    We had a Nicholsons Robin Hood, I think which was similar. Always known as the wuffler. We used it combination with a vicon turner having eight spider wheels.

    The doors never really shifted the hay across very much. It did not like rabbit holes or ridge and furrow, nor did the turner.

    The wuffler fluffed it up a bit while the turner wound it into a rope.

    Haybob was a big step forward but it does not invert the swath like the turner did.

    Used to go all over the county with the wuffler and turner hitched behind the 135. With all those castor wheels it could easily snake, so had to keep the speed down.

  12. #12
    Dry Rot
    Guest

    Re: Lely Phesant's

    Quote Originally Posted by peasantman View Post
    We had a Nicholsons Robin Hood, I think which was similar. Always known as the wuffler. We used it combination with a vicon turner having eight spider wheels.

    The doors never really shifted the hay across very much. It did not like rabbit holes or ridge and furrow, nor did the turner.

    The wuffler fluffed it up a bit while the turner wound it into a rope.

    Haybob was a big step forward but it does not invert the swath like the turner did.

    Used to go all over the county with the wuffler and turner hitched behind the 135. With all those castor wheels it could easily snake, so had to keep the speed down.
    I, too, had a Robin Hood. One year, I was the only one around here to get their hay! I think the trick was to keep fluffing it up if there was any drying at all. I've still got a hankering for a swather....

  13. #13
    Exfarmer
    Guest

    Re: Lely Phesant's

    I am not sure why these machines have been given a bad name
    As long as you were not to cavalier driving them
    Like so many machines were an improvement on what we had before they came along and were superseded by what followed
    They still have certain merits by fluffing up a narrow swath they keep the hay off the ground and in a wet time allow both the hay and grass to dry on a good day
    We would sometime ted the swath 4 times a day, each time offsetting the swath so it went back on to a drier strip

    They were prone to losing wheels and tines if you hit ruts too quickly

  14. #14
    Exfarmer
    Guest

    Re: Lely Phesant's

    Raking the back swath
    Done with an old lister hay rake
    Got all the little missed bits
    To make some bales which were so badly sunburnt they were hardly worth collecting

  15. #15
    daveb
    Guest

    Re: Lely Phesant's

    Always thought the back swath was the one you cut the opposite way round, under the hedge. At least the person I learnt most from when i was young called it the back swath, he would be almost 100 now if still alive. In the mid 60s through till the late 70s I used a Cock Pheasant a lot, thought it was a good machine for all the + points others have pointed out.
    A lot of this use was on river meadows that flooded and grew some real tough ropey grass and as long as you gave it time the pheasant did a good job. It was certainly a more pleasant machine to operate than the Haybob which replaced it and the Acrobat as the haymaking machines here.
    I can still remember the displeasure of the man mentioned previously when his younger brother bought the Haybob, you have to drive on the crop, he complained, didnt hold with that at all.

  16. #16
    Exfarmer
    Guest

    Re: Lely Phesant's

    Sorry age catching me again
    Dave is quite right
    Bamfords rake was best for this steered right over with the back wheels

  17. #17
    deere2140
    Guest

    Re: Lely Phesant's

    We had a Golden Pheasant , the GTI version ( woo hoo ) bought new in the late 60's , I remember using it when I was probably too young to drive tractors . For turning the swaths we used a trailed Dickie Turner , which didn't give the roping problems that the acrobat would , although our turner ( a converted horse machine ) needed an extra man ( or boy ) sitting on its seat to lift it in and out of work and reversing the direction of the rotors at the end of rows . And the hay was cut with a International B23 mower .
    However the PZ company prolonged our haymaking into the 90's , as the CM165 mower and Mark 1 Haybob transformed the job .

  18. #18
    defender
    Guest

    Re: Lely Phesant's

    the flying pheasant was the dogs danglies of the range ,lift mounted 2 row machine ,much tidier at the ends and solid back doors to make a tidy job of 2 rows in to 1

  19. #19
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2017
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    2

    Re: Lely Phesant's

    Quote Originally Posted by joe soapy View Post
    still have nightmares about changing the belts on cock pheasant
    yes and didn't they burn quickly if you got it ravelled up

  20. #20
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2017
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    2

    Re: Lely Phesant's

    Quote Originally Posted by peasantman View Post
    We had a Nicholsons Robin Hood, I think which was similar. Always known as the wuffler. We used it combination with a vicon turner having eight spider wheels.

    The doors never really shifted the hay across very much. It did not like rabbit holes or ridge and furrow, nor did the turner.

    The wuffler fluffed it up a bit while the turner wound it into a rope.

    Haybob was a big step forward but it does not invert the swath like the turner did.

    Used to go all over the county with the wuffler and turner hitched behind the 135. With all those castor wheels it could easily snake, so had to keep the speed down.
    yes you're right it was called a wuffler

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