Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 50

Thread: massey ferguson 34 drill

  1. #1
    biggles
    Guest

    massey ferguson 34 drill

    will this be any good for doing about 20 acres a year, are they good/bad, anything to watch out for on them etc, know where there is one for sale, whats it worth? cheers

  2. #2
    Red Fred
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    If that is the same as ours, (rubber tyred combination drill with 3 point attachment), it should be OK. I did 30 or 40 acres a year with it until a couple of years ago and never had any bother. I used to tow it with our little IH250 for vintage fun, but a 434 (43hp) was happier on it, and could also tow the harrows. It wouldn't hold much fert but on a small area it didn't matter, easier with small bags. It still looks in good nick and little rust so I always felt it was made from decent metal.

  3. #3
    Red Fred
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Should add, mine has Suffolk coulters which were humungously expensive to replace if they were even available, but I welded spring tine points to them and they worked fine on a small area.

  4. #4
    biggles
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    were they all suffolk colters or were some discs?

  5. #5
    heaty
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    We used to have a disc one before our 30, it was a super drill,we pulled it with a 434 with duals on, would drill in any conditions,never made a mess,makes me wonder about progress using 200 horse to sow corn. AAAH those were the days. Sorry about that,just drifted off for a mo.

  6. #6
    dgw
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Used ours for years and it was okay. Problems today would be that the rows are at 7" spacing rather than 4" (4 is much better IMO); and filling the small grain hopper from big bags would be more tricky than we used to do with 50kg bags by hand. A 15 row would be better than the 13 as long as you have minimum of 12' gateways; wider sowing width and slightly bigger hopper.

    We never used the fertilizer side of the 34, used to broadcast instead to speed up sowing, and also to avoid all the hoo hah of having to thoroughly clean all the cogs and components etc to avoid rusting. Very good drills in their day and could still do a job today.

  7. #7
    Big Vern
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Quote Originally Posted by biggles View Post
    will this be any good for doing about 20 acres a year, are they good/bad, anything to watch out for on them etc, know where there is one for sale, whats it worth? cheers
    dont know what it would be worth, first farm i worked on in the 80s had 1 similar to red freds rubber wheels 3 point linkage used to drill wheat, barley oats and grass, as i reccolect there was no tramline kit although i think you could manually shut the pipes to make a tramline and ours had no markers but it where only as wide as the tractor (ish)
    how much do they want for? what sort of nick is it in when was it last used??

  8. #8
    Exfarmer
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Quote Originally Posted by heaty View Post
    We used to have a disc one before our 30, it was a super drill,we pulled it with a 434 with duals on, would drill in any conditions,never made a mess,makes me wonder about progress using 200 horse to sow corn. AAAH those were the days. Sorry about that,just drifted off for a mo.
    +1
    it was one day with a 3m power harrow combi drilling late as rain was expected, I was crawling up the field using 120 HP and I suddenly thought,
    oh for that old 4 metre MF30 I would have been at home eating my dinner long ago

  9. #9
    Red Fred
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    I seem to recall seeing a very similar, but grey, drill at the Dorset Steam Fair, so would the 34 have been a designed originally for Ferguson? We also have one of the Massey Ferguson drills from the '50s with the big metal wheels and wooden backed hopper (No7??) but I guess that must have evolved from the Massey Harris side of the business.

  10. #10
    Cowabunga
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    MF 34 was a super drill. It was a one man drill for when external hydraulics were uncommon. It was semi-trailed, in that the drawbar was attached to the three point linkage. The action of raising the links pulled the top link of the drawbar forward relative to the fixed lower part and, through a linkage mechanism on the drill, moved the cogs out of mesh to stop the flow of seed and fertiliser.
    There was another, larger capacity drill, possibly a 28 but I don't remember exactly, that was built and sold at the same time as the 34.

    'Sunshine' rings a bell. Did they have something to do with MF drills at one time?

  11. #11
    Red Fred
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Looked at our "big" drill this morning and it is a Massey-Harris-Ferguson 728 (with M-H-F on the castings.) "Sunshine" does ring a bell for that one although I can't see it written anywhere,and they also made our MH Sunshine binder. I think the binder has H.V. MacKay Pty on it too which I guess was an Australian subsidiary.

  12. #12
    Cowabunga
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Quote Originally Posted by Red Fred View Post
    Looked at our "big" drill this morning and it is a Massey-Harris-Ferguson 728 (with M-H-F on the castings.) "Sunshine" does ring a bell for that one although I can't see it written anywhere,and they also made our MH Sunshine binder. I think the binder has H.V. MacKay Pty on it too which I guess was an Australian subsidiary.
    Wasn't that far out with the model number then. Phew! Yours, with M-H-F will be from the mid to late 1950's probably. They continued to make these two drills into the very late 1960's I seem to remember.

    This will be the drill with the large diameter wheels of course. Can't remember how this was switched on. Think it was a pull string with later ones having a hydraulic ram. It must be 45 years since I've seen one and then only in passing.
    Did own and use a 34 though, up until about 18 years ago when it was replaced with my current Sulky mounted 3m drill.

  13. #13
    John Maddock
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Quote Originally Posted by Red Fred View Post
    Looked at our "big" drill this morning and it is a Massey-Harris-Ferguson 728 (with M-H-F on the castings.) "Sunshine" does ring a bell for that one although I can't see it written anywhere,and they also made our MH Sunshine binder. I think the binder has H.V. MacKay Pty on it too which I guess was an Australian subsidiary.
    Correct. Both "Sunshine" & "H.V.McKay " are (or were) well known names in grain equipment in Aus. A bit before my time, but I'm pretty sure they were trade names of Massey Harris. I expect someone will make a correction if necessary.

    JV

  14. #14
    Red Fred
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    The 728 has a gearbox mounted on the drawbar which is driven from the wheels by a pair of slow moving chains. When you pull on the rope, the pawl engages and the gearbox turns, lifting the coulters from the ground and stopping the drive.
    Another tug reverses the operation. It is quite a neat mechanism.
    Just Googled Sunshine Harvesters and it says they were one of Australia's biggest industrial concerns in the early 20th century.

  15. #15
    MF-ANDY
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    i think the 728 was the one with the spoked steel wheels and wooden box, cant remember how the grain fed but the fertilizer was the star wheel and knocker type feed. the one that followed that and sold alongside the 34 was the 29. both had the coulters lifted by a trip clutch driven from the wheels and a rope to trip it. spent many hours as a lad on the rear platform looking for blockages and trying not to fall off into the zig zag harrows.

  16. #16
    Cowabunga
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Quote Originally Posted by MF-ANDY View Post
    i think the 728 was the one with the spoked steel wheels and wooden box, cant remember how the grain fed but the fertilizer was the star wheel and knocker type feed. the one that followed that and sold alongside the 34 was the 29. both had the coulters lifted by a trip clutch driven from the wheels and a rope to trip it. spent many hours as a lad on the rear platform looking for blockages and trying not to fall off into the zig zag harrows.
    28? 29? What's a single digit out between friends!

    Yes, the one I'm thinking of, the one before the 30, was probably the 29.
    When I was a lad we had a manned combine drill that had a big lever which the drill lad swung across to stop the drive and raise the coulters. That was probably a war-ag imported Sunshine drill from Australia come to think of it. Used to pull it with a 65 with a cast iron Fordson wheel used as ballast to gain grip up the hills. Sold that and bought the used 34.

  17. #17
    Big Vern
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Quote Originally Posted by Cowabunga View Post
    28? 29? What's a single digit out between friends!

    Yes, the one I'm thinking of, the one before the 30, was probably the 29.
    When I was a lad we had a manned combine drill that had a big lever which the drill lad swung across to stop the drive and raise the coulters. That was probably a war-ag imported Sunshine drill from Australia come to think of it. Used to pull it with a 65 with a cast iron Fordson wheel used as ballast to gain grip up the hills. Sold that and bought the used 34.
    i think they where usung something similar on the "wartime farm" prog the other night to dill there flax, bloke was fair heaving on a big x lever at the end of the rows, i think they had to lift it on a wood block and spin the wheel to calibrate it as well.. often wondered how drills where calibrated in the "past" its "easy now"... rerad book-spin handle x amount of times, do calculation on back of fag packet re check job done..

  18. #18
    Hesston4860s
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    I learnt to drill with a pull string Massey drill and leyland 245 and continued to do all our drilling with it till the late 90's when for us we got a state of the art Massey 30 4m with Hyd in/out, Hyd markers and tramlining. Pulled the 30 with our JD 2140 which was heaven after the leyland.

  19. #19
    dgw
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Spent many hundreds of hours riding on the foot board of an Albion drill pulled by a Dexta, pulling down on the big lever to raise the coulters out of work and and lifting it up to re engage the gears and lower the coulters. Used to sow round and round the fields in those days; could be a bloody cold job in March with an east wind blowing that pink (organo mercury?) seed dressing everywhere as you dusted it into the hopper!

  20. #20
    Cowabunga
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Quote Originally Posted by dgw View Post
    Spent many hundreds of hours riding on the foot board of an Albion drill pulled by a Dexta, pulling down on the big lever to raise the coulters out of work and and lifting it up to re engage the gears and lower the coulters. Used to sow round and round the fields in those days; could be a bloody cold job in March with an east wind blowing that pink (organo mercury?) seed dressing everywhere as you dusted it into the hopper!
    Yes, chapped lips time!
    The footboards initially didn't have a guard to stop one slipping off forward of it. Pretty sure a few people lost at least a leg that way. I remember the HSE requiring ours to be fitted with vertical planks in front of the standing for this reason.
    The were very long levers that needed swinging at least 90 degrees iirc.

    Like most things of the day, if I saw one this afternoon I would probably think it has shrunk to a third of its former size.

  21. #21
    HotBed
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    sold my MF 34 that was in very good condition (grain only) suffolk coulters in good condition and a spare set for 200 two years ago, it went to a collector in germany

    regards HB

  22. #22
    dgw
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Yes, as Scooby says, I do remember the MF 34 had a habit of sticking discs with scrapers not working properly, and a consequential array of some discs with flat sides! This might well have partly been my fault but I suspect it might also have been a rather poor design in this respect and in certain conditions. Having said all this it was infinitely better than riding on the foot board of the old Albion that preceded it!

  23. #23
    biggles
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    thanks for all the replies great bit of info there, its always good to here what other people think of things.

  24. #24
    Sussex Martin
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Scooby, I had one similar to yours in post 21 but mine had wooden boxes for seed and fetiliser. It was a Massey but for the life of me can't remember which one. Used to make a good job on ploughing after a quick once over with a pressure Harrow in the spring.

  25. #25
    Cowabunga
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Quote Originally Posted by Scooby View Post
    I have never seen a 34 or a 732 with a wooden seed box. The fert was always wood front, back, and ends with a tin top. The bottom was made up of the plates that the star wheels fitted into.
    Wood? Never seen a 34 with a wooden fertiliser box. Not even an old grey one.

  26. #26
    Cowabunga
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Quote Originally Posted by Scooby View Post
    You have now. Have a look at my middle photo above.The back of that box is wood. It has a strip of steel running along the top. All the wing nuts that fasten the sealing strips in place are themselves fastened with wood screws. The bracing bars are fastened with coach bolts into the timber.

    The front of the box is timber as well although that can't be seen clearly. The box does not share anything with the seed box. It is a separate entity and can be lifted off the frame of the drill and not used which is what I used to do when sowing grass seeds.
    Could rotten steel have been chopped out and replaced with wood?
    Or can you confirm that the factory supplied a wooden option?

  27. #27
    daveb
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Quote Originally Posted by Cowabunga View Post
    Could rotten steel have been chopped out and replaced with wood?
    Or can you confirm that the factory supplied a wooden option?
    The grey Ferguson version that we had certainly had a wooden fert box, same as Scoobys.

  28. #28
    Sussex Martin
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Quote Originally Posted by Scooby View Post
    I have never seen a 34 or a 732 with a wooden seed box. The fert was always wood front, back, and ends with a tin top. The bottom was made up of the plates that the star wheels fitted into.
    You are probably right Scooby, I just remember the fertiliser box (that as you say was removeable) was timber. It was a grey one by the way!

  29. #29
    Cowabunga
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Quote Originally Posted by Sussex Martin View Post
    You are probably right Scooby, I just remember the fertiliser box (that as you say was removeable) was timber. It was a grey one by the way!
    Quite possibly. The fertiliser box was removed from mine many years ago, leaving only the seed box working. It must be about 20 years or more since I bought the replacement Sulky come to think about it. Time flies.

  30. #30
    Orcadian
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Our MF34 was all steel and every other that i have seen were too. If it was gray I doubt very much it was a 34 they were all red,our older drill was grey but that was grain only and was a Ferguson.It was originally fitted with aloy brackets were the coulter stalks joined the frame of the seeder but they broke and were replaced by the later metal ones.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •