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Thread: massey ferguson 34 drill

  1. #31
    Cowabunga
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Quote Originally Posted by Orcadian View Post
    Our 34 was all steel and every other that i have seen were too
    The more I think about it the more convinced I am that they were all steel. At least the ones that I have ever seen have been.

  2. #32
    dgw
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Every MF 34 I have seen has been all steel; not disputing what others have said about wooden hoppers, but I am surprised that they were fitted to the 34. You live and learn.

  3. #33
    dgw
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Already got my anorak on, even though I never go out. I think all Massey stuff with a '7' prefix was a throwback to Massey Harris who sold their British implements with this prefix to distinguish them from American models. Thus a 732 or 728 would probably have started production in the Massey-Harris-Ferguson era of the late 1950's, and may have previously been sold overseas as a MH32 or MH28. If I'm not mistaken the MF34 was only followed by the MF30 drill.

    Must go now as the shipping forecast is on soon and I need to get to bed.

  4. #34
    Exfarmer
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    The 7 prefix certainly designates UK build
    The Massey 30 was not related to these drills at all
    The 30 was built by Howard's at Harleston in Norfolk
    But Masseys sold them as their own drill

  5. #35
    daveb
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    The grey Ferguson 732 which we used to have, like Scoobys in the photo had a wooden fert box and if the drill in this video is an MF 34, it looks like it is all metal. It's a different shape as well http://vimeo.com/24308182

  6. #36
    Cowabunga
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Quote Originally Posted by Exfarmer View Post
    The 7 prefix certainly designates UK build
    The Massey 30 was not related to these drills at all
    The 30 was built by Howard's at Harleston in Norfolk
    But Masseys sold them as their own drill
    Almost all their implements have always been contracted out or badge-engineered. Their own factories tend to concentrate on core products.

    They used to be very strong in the implement sector but lost it all, possibly for good management and profitability reasons, apart from front loaders for its own-brand tractors. They now have the potential to regrow this sector with the Fella products from their own factories should they decide [centrally] that selling these products as their own brand is worth the candle. For all we know it might be better overall to leave Fella to get on with it as they are in marketing terms.

  7. #37
    Orcadian
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Quote Originally Posted by Scooby View Post
    I seem to remember this. But who built the 130 "direct" drill then ? And when Roger Dowdeswell took over the Howard stuff why didn't he continue with the drill ? They were very popular round here. Must have sold thousands.

    I wrote earlier about the field test boys who came on to he farm where I was working at the time with their new toy based on the MF 5 ton trailer chassis.

    It was wet at the time. They got stuck. Then REALLY stuck. Then we had two tractors on it. I think we got it out with three. We never saw the drill again. Like most drills it would have been O.K. in the dry but most drills are. It's the wet that sorts the men from he boys.
    The 130 was a heavy drill for direct drilling never seen one but think they had triple discs,
    The last drill that MF sold was a 500 with a lot more plastic componants to try and combat the rust.

  8. #38
    Cowabunga
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Quote Originally Posted by Orcadian View Post
    The 130 was a heavy drill for direct drilling never seen one but think they had triple discs,
    The last drill that MF sold was a 500 with a lot more plastic componants to try and combat the rust.
    There was a 130 drill next door to me for a short while. Yes it was primarily a direct drill. They did not sell many as far as I know and judging from my neighbours, who were not renowned for maintaining their equipment, it was not a great success. This was possibly more to do with the type of land and the dd techniques of the day than down to the drill though. Not sure.

    Isn't the 500 a badge engineered Accord?

  9. #39
    Cowabunga
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Quote Originally Posted by Scooby View Post
    Just re-read my post and as usual my command of the English language has let me down. What I meant to say was why didn't Roger Dowdeswell continue with the MF30 drill ? They must have sold in their thousands. I always thought that a 130 was a poor version of the Bettinson of the day.
    The MF30 was indeed a huge success for many years. Wide combine drills went out of fashion in favour of more versatile and compact air-seeders towards the end though. It is possible that the design was MF's, not their building contractor's. Their day had passed and the competition in air-seeders was intense. They chose to compete less than full-on in the new era.

  10. #40
    Orcadian
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Quote Originally Posted by Cowabunga View Post
    There was a 130 drill next door to me for a short while. Yes it was primarily a direct drill. They did not sell many as far as I know and judging from my neighbours, who were not renowned for maintaining their equipment, it was not a great success. This was possibly more to do with the type of land and the dd techniques of the day than down to the drill though. Not sure.

    Isn't the 500 a badge engineered Accord?
    Think it was the 510 that was also badged as a Vicon who i think made it and there was a bit of a wrangle over it which Vicon won.
    The 500 was an end wheel drill just like the 30

  11. #41
    Exfarmer
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Quote Originally Posted by Cowabunga View Post
    The MF30 was indeed a huge success for many years. Wide combine drills went out of fashion in favour of more versatile and compact air-seeders towards the end though. It is possible that the design was MF's, not their building contractor's. Their day had passed and the competition in air-seeders was intense. They chose to compete less than full-on in the new era.
    The 30 was definitely Howard's design
    MF had just rejigged their old drill and some were sold off cheap
    (I know as my father bought one but regretted it as the neighbours 30 was so much better)
    The other thing that put a lot of farmers off the earliest was that you needed a spool on the tractor , or two if you had markers which few tractors had then

  12. #42
    MF-ANDY
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Quote Originally Posted by Exfarmer View Post
    The 30 was definitely Howard's design
    MF had just rejigged their old drill and some were sold off cheap
    (I know as my father bought one but regretted it as the neighbours 30 was so much better)
    The other thing that put a lot of farmers off the earliest was that you needed a spool on the tractor , or two if you had markers which few tractors had then
    yes and ford spools were no good they couldn't hold the pressure to hold the coulters in. any drill we sold to fit on a ford we always fitted a non return check valve in the line.

  13. #43
    john63
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Quote Originally Posted by Scooby View Post
    I also had an MF 30 drill but it was a tine drill and got used for planting beans. I could never understand why the design meant that you had to keep the pressure on the auxillary hydraulcs to keep the drill in work. Seemed A-about-face to me. It wasn't a problem for me because I used a DB on it with the hydraulics spot on and they wouldn't let it creep but I bet the some drills caused a few misses when the pressure gradually came off during long bouts. :cry:
    Yep ours creeps a bit when it's on our 475. Have to keep giving the spool valve a tug occasionally. At least the yellow plate on the ram gives a bit of a guide to where it is.

  14. #44
    peasantman
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Been drilling oats today with our old MF30 on power harrowed ploughed land that needs a light touch. Treated it to a new set of discs and deflectors. Went very well with parmiter following harrows. Not a wheeling left in the field, all seed nicely covered and left loose enough not to get too tight if it gets a swilling. Nice and simple to use and Lamborghini 105 pulls it with ease. What a refreshing change.

    Yes the depth can creep back a bit but just gave it a nudge now and again. Also got a bit close to a pole stay wire and had to pull the harrows back mandraulically.

  15. #45
    heaty
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    We still use a 30 disc drill on a bridge link behind the power harrow on a 6810, well balanced outfit, doesnt maul the headlands,sows 40ac a day and has a PROPER following harrow. Out of fashion I know, but it works for us.

  16. #46
    Wombat
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    We have 4m 30 cracking drill, does all our bit really well

  17. #47
    peasantman
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Quote Originally Posted by heaty View Post
    We still use a 30 disc drill on a bridge link behind the power harrow on a 6810, well balanced outfit, doesnt maul the headlands,sows 40ac a day and has a PROPER following harrow. Out of fashion I know, but it works for us.
    What does the bridge link look like? Heard of them and might be tempted to make one. Does it go from tractor drawbar to drill avoiding PTO??

  18. #48
    heaty
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Quote Originally Posted by peasantman View Post
    What does the bridge link look like? Heard of them and might be tempted to make one. Does it go from tractor drawbar to drill avoiding PTO??
    Its a Lely bridge link, replaces the drawbar and bolts to the same fixings. 5 inch square box rises to height of seed box then forward about 6 foot to a small A frame on the back of the headstock of the power harrow by means of a standard ball hitch. You can turn just past right angle with it.

  19. #49
    dgw
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    There's a photo of a bridge link system, in this month's Classic Tractor in which they have done a few pages on ploughing and cultivation methods of the 1970's.

  20. #50
    heaty
    Guest

    Re: massey ferguson 34 drill

    Quote Originally Posted by dgw View Post
    There's a photo of a bridge link system, in this month's Classic Tractor in which they have done a few pages on ploughing and cultivation methods of the 1970's.
    Yes,the very one. My god,have we had it that long!

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