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Thread: Workshop lighting suggestions

  1. #1
    Footsfitter
    Guest

    Workshop lighting suggestions

    Existing setup is 40'x90' workshop with 6x15' bays.

    Each bay has 2 x twin 8' 100w or 125w batten fluorescents with reflectors, all hung 16' from floor level.

    With the current demise of 8' fittings what would you suggest as replacements??


    ff



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  2. #2
    davidroberts30
    Guest

    Re: Workshop lighting suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Footsfitter View Post
    Existing setup is 40'x90' workshop with 6x15' bays.

    Each bay has 2 x twin 8' 100w or 125w batten fluorescents with reflectors, all hung 16' from floor level.

    With the current demise of 8' fittings what would you suggest as replacements??


    ff



    .
    led's

    been looking tonight to put something in the cattle shed to break the dark
    http://www.simplyled.co.uk/T8-LED-Tubes_B24QDW.aspx

  3. #3
    Exfarmer
    Guest

    Re: Workshop lighting suggestions

    Son lamps are good in a workshop as they provide true light
    But are slow to start

    But are you sure you cannot fit the narrow tubes in the same fittings

  4. #4
    Footsfitter
    Guest

    Re: Workshop lighting suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by davidroberts30 View Post
    led's

    been looking tonight to put something in the cattle shed to break the dark
    http://www.simplyled.co.uk/T8-LED-Tubes_B24QDW.aspx
    They only go up to 6' not cheap though!!


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  5. #5
    Footsfitter
    Guest

    Re: Workshop lighting suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Exfarmer View Post
    Son lamps are good in a workshop as they provide true light
    But are slow to start

    But are you sure you cannot fit the narrow tubes in the same fittings

    I don't think they have ever made the narrow tubes in anything longer than 6'. That is one option to change fittings to twin 6' as the old 8footers fail.



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  6. #6
    Richard
    Guest

    Re: Workshop lighting suggestions

    not all gone yet;
    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/100W-125W-...#ht_500wt_1180
    get stocked up!

  7. #7
    Ad
    Guest

    Re: Workshop lighting suggestions

    250w Metal Halide would make a good direct replacement for the florescent's, similar wattage, why not buy 1 and try it before you replace the lot?

    Somthing like this http://www.lightingcentre.com/250-wa...-lopak-ii.html

  8. #8
    davidroberts30
    Guest

    Re: Workshop lighting suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Footsfitter View Post
    They only go up to 6' not cheap though!!


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    but they cost peanuts to run and will last 3x longer than conv. tubes

  9. #9
    Ritchie
    Guest

    Re: Workshop lighting suggestions

    Some of those Metal halide lamps in the workshop where i help out sometimes. Useless, if it was'nt for the striplights above the workbenches we'd not be able to see anything.

    Footsfitter go for the twin 6 ft sealed ones, plenty of light and use about same as you existing 8 foot striplights, there is a choice of light quality you can get in fluorescent tubes you could try.

    Ritchie

  10. #10
    aardvark
    Guest

    Re: Workshop lighting suggestions

    Don't use SON as the light is yellow. Metal halide is white and much better to work with.

    I have both metal halide and strip lights in my workshop. It is 1800sqft and painted white inside, but with both sets of lights on it is lighter in there than outside on a winters day.

    I use 3 x 400w metal halide lights and 1500w of fluorescent tubes. I seldom need a lead light to work under a vehicle. Plenty of light sources rather than a few lights also helps.

    For indoor use the cheap alloy powder coated units from ebay at about 45 for metal halide is a great choice.

    LED will get better and cheaper in a few years time but 300 to 400 on MH lights would only buy a couple of LEDs.

  11. #11
    Mo
    Guest

    Re: Workshop lighting suggestions

    I was told always to use 5foots rather than 6 as they are better in cold conditions and they are proportionally cheaper...

  12. #12
    Ad
    Guest

    Re: Workshop lighting suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Ritchie View Post
    Some of those Metal halide lamps in the workshop where i help out sometimes. Useless, if it was'nt for the striplights above the workbenches we'd not be able to see anything.
    Ritchie
    Yeah i forgot, friend has them in his workshop and they were crap until he cleaned the bulbs, glass and lenses the difference was like night and day, must be the fumes off the welder as most of his work is fabrication.

    So maybe one of these would be a better bet http://www.right-light.co.uk/250-wat...loodlight.html

    Same light just sealed

  13. #13
    Exfarmer
    Guest

    Re: Workshop lighting suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by aardvark View Post
    Don't use SON as the light is yellow. Metal halide is white and much better to work with.

    I have both metal halide and strip lights in my workshop. It is 1800sqft and painted white inside, but with both sets of lights on it is lighter in there than outside on a winters day.

    I use 3 x 400w metal halide lights and 1500w of fluorescent tubes. I seldom need a lead light to work under a vehicle. Plenty of light sources rather than a few lights also helps.

    For indoor use the cheap alloy powder coated units from ebay at about 45 for metal halide is a great choice.

    LED will get better and cheaper in a few years time but 300 to 400 on MH lights would only buy a couple of LEDs.
    Son lamps are available in white and they are a very good light for working in as it is very close to daylight
    They are supposed to have shorter working life than the yellow variant but I had one installed 30 years ago and I believe it is still working

  14. #14
    Footsfitter
    Guest

    Re: Workshop lighting suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by davidroberts30 View Post
    but they cost peanuts to run and will last 3x longer than conv. tubes
    Trouble is some of the fittings were fairly 2nd hand when I acquired them nearly 30 years ago..............................



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  15. #15
    Footsfitter
    Guest

    Re: Workshop lighting suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Ad View Post
    250w Metal Halide would make a good direct replacement for the florescent's, similar wattage, why not buy 1 and try it before you replace the lot?

    Somthing like this http://www.lightingcentre.com/250-wa...-lopak-ii.html

    I'll have a hunt aroundin my store shed as I think there may be a couple that never made it to their intended project. Try one (or two) may be ideal before committing to all 12!



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  16. #16
    wr
    Guest

    Re: Workshop lighting suggestions

    Our workshop is 60x30 and we have 2 of the 5' enclosed polycarbonate strip lights per bay plus above work bench. It's good light, quite cheap to install and run.

  17. #17
    Julian_P
    Guest

    Re: Workshop lighting suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Footsfitter View Post
    Existing setup is 40'x90' workshop with 6x15' bays.

    Each bay has 2 x twin 8' 100w or 125w batten fluorescents with reflectors, all hung 16' from floor level.

    With the current demise of 8' fittings what would you suggest as replacements??


    ff



    .
    I purchased some 8' tubes about a year ago. Had no difficulty sourcing them from the local electrical factors. I'd keep them going until you can no longer get tubes. (assuming I'm not behind the times here and you can no longer get them?)

    Maybe stock-pile some tubes? - that's going to be cheaper than changing out all the fittings.

    Julian

  18. #18
    RGSP
    Guest

    Re: Workshop lighting suggestions

    My trade supplier hasn't been able to get fluorescent tubes over 6' for some years now, and anything over 5' has to be ordered from the central depot.

    For a workshop, stroboscopic effects are potentially quite dangerous with single conventional fluorescents. Some of the twin tube fittings have quadrature phased pairs, which avoids this, and high frequency fittings are not bad for this either, though a bit expensive.

    If it was my workshop, I'd replace the old ones only one by one as they fail, because as said above, in a couple of years LEDs will be better and cheaper than any light now available, but at the moment metal halides may be the way to go, or simple fluorescents.

  19. #19
    Footsfitter
    Guest

    Re: Workshop lighting suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Julian_P View Post
    I purchased some 8' tubes about a year ago. Had no difficulty sourcing them from the local electrical factors. I'd keep them going until you can no longer get tubes. (assuming I'm not behind the times here and you can no longer get them?)

    Maybe stock-pile some tubes? - that's going to be cheaper than changing out all the fittings.

    Julian

    Every time I order some 8 footers they are getting harder to find and the prices keep going up!

    Not sure which type they have where my son used to work, they may of been halides but they were forever having problems if they were switched of and back on again

    I think the 6' twins seem a better idea pricewise, have to see how they compare lightwise to the halides recommended above

    ff



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  20. #20
    joe soapy
    Guest

    Re: Workshop lighting suggestions

    If you look round the back of some industrial sites you may find the skip where all the takeout tubes are dumped. Firm in plymouth seems to have the contract to replace strip lights on a planned timed basis in public buildings.
    collected an armfull of used tubes, nearly all were working

  21. #21
    Exfarmer
    Guest

    Re: Workshop lighting suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by joe soapy View Post
    If you look round the back of some industrial sites you may find the skip where all the takeout tubes are dumped. Firm in plymouth seems to have the contract to replace strip lights on a planned timed basis in public buildings.
    collected an armfull of used tubes, nearly all were working
    Taking from skips is a felony
    please don`t do it FF
    we will be lost without you

    seriously I bet millions are dumped each year
    I know most Government offices change all their light bulbs once a year

  22. #22
    Red Bull
    Guest

    Re: Workshop lighting suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Exfarmer View Post
    seriously I bet millions are dumped each year
    I know most Government offices change all their light bulbs once a year
    I wonder how much that is costing the tax payer over and above replacing when blown. Austerity, they don't know the meaning of the word.

  23. #23
    joe soapy
    Guest

    Re: Workshop lighting suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Red Bull View Post
    I wonder how much that is costing the tax payer over and above replacing when blown. Austerity, they don't know the meaning of the word.
    the cost of a new tube is not significant, the real cost is the time taken to establish that the tube is gone, somebody to verify that, then get permission to order replacement, the cost will go on and on. would not be surprised if a simple blown bulb ran into 4 figures time all costs were toted up

  24. #24
    Footsfitter
    Guest

    Re: Workshop lighting suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Exfarmer View Post
    Taking from skips is a felony
    please don`t do it FF
    we will be lost without you

    seriously I bet millions are dumped each year
    I know most Government offices change all their light bulbs once a year

    We've maxed out on skip surfing here, a former tenant ran a skip business alongside our lime quarry where he would sort what came in into various material groups to go to the right waste processes.

    What comes in as waste from todays construction/refurbishment industry is a felony!

    Several of our staff were keen skip surfers and it got to the point that if he hadn't retired and sold up we would of had a major problem storing all the "pickings", the amount of fixings and plumbing/pipe fittings alone we have stashed away is huge. One persons waste is anothers manna from heaven!


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  25. #25
    mbsrhol
    Guest

    Re: Workshop lighting suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by joe soapy View Post
    the cost of a new tube is not significant, the real cost is the time taken to establish that the tube is gone, somebody to verify that, then get permission to order replacement, the cost will go on and on. would not be surprised if a simple blown bulb ran into 4 figures time all costs were toted up
    + they lose efficiency over time, so it is very cost effective to change.

    Is it a myth that you shouldn't have florescent lights where spinning discs are used?

  26. #26
    RGSP
    Guest

    Re: Workshop lighting suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by mbsrhol View Post
    Is it a myth that you shouldn't have florescent lights where spinning discs are used?
    It's certainly true that you shouldn't rely on simple single fluorescents in workshops with lathes and similar machines. The stroboscopic effect means that a lathe running maybe close to 1000 rpm appears to be either static or moving slowly.

    A number of people in the past have lost hands and arms as a result of this, but it's something HSE have been fairly strict on in educational and industrial workshops, though not "hobby" ones, and I suspect rarely farm ones.

    It is a real effect, not just some theoretical concept, and I have seen it myself. The potential problem really ought to be taken seriously.

  27. #27
    Exfarmer
    Guest

    Re: Workshop lighting suggestions

    The Strobe effect is interesting and would suggest that it is actually quite dangerous to rely on one or two high output lamps for this reason.
    Apparently many types of modern lamp can have this effect at a cetrtain speed of rotation.
    It is suggested for safety sake a bright incandescent bulb should be present at all times close to rotating machinery for safety reasons
    of course the effect can be used, with careful use of a strobe light to accurately see what you are doing when drilling grinding etc

  28. #28
    Timbo_1975
    Guest

    Re: Workshop lighting suggestions

    *most* new flouro's now have high frequency electronic ballasts now for this very reason, and should be insisted on where there are synchronous motors spinning.

    Sons, and MH and the like still flicker on/off at 50hz so be careful!

    A high wattage filament bulb will be much better as it doesnt actually go out each time the voltage changes direction cos of the thermal mass of the filament.

    Remember the Gunson strobeoscope...

  29. #29
    JohnBoy
    Guest

    Re: Workshop lighting suggestions

    Is it true that positioning different flourescent tubes at 90 degrees to each other reduces/cancels the stroboscopic effect?

    I've done it that way in our sheds because a physics teacher told us that in school many moons ago.

  30. #30
    RGSP
    Guest

    Re: Workshop lighting suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnBoy View Post
    Is it true that positioning different flourescent tubes at 90 degrees to each other reduces/cancels the stroboscopic effect?

    I've done it that way in our sheds because a physics teacher told us that in school many moons ago.
    No, either you or your physics teacher has confused 90 degrees in phase with 90 degrees in position. The easiest and almost universal way of characterising AC waveforms is by their phase, where the instantaneous voltage (say) will be given by:
    V(inst) = V(peak) X cosine(theta)
    where theta is the phase angle. If you don't like sines and cosines, no worry, the key thing is that as this characteristic angle goes from 0 to 360 degrees it does through two peaks (when light will be at max), one positive at 90 degrees, and one negative at 270 degrees, and it will go through zero twice, once at 0 and once at 180 degrees, when the light output will go to zero.

    By using capacitors and inductors you can shift the phase of an ac power source, and it was common to operate fluorescents in pairs: one run from the unshifted mains, and one from a 90 degree shifted source, so that the peaks of light from one tube coincide with the dark points of the other, and vice versa.

    You have to order in such pairs specially, and to be honest I'm not sure whether you can still easily get them, because high frequency fluorescent fittings have mostly taken over, and have got to be only moderately expensive.

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