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Thread: Claydon disappointing

  1. #1
    redbaron
    Guest

    Claydon disappointing

    I had hoped to have a JD750 drilling for me today into my sticky untouched rape stubble. But 750 couldnt come, and I was too anxious to get the wheat drilled before another wetting... it will not take much more for this land to be impossible. So called in a Claydon. I hadnt used one for 4 years, and I now remember why I wasnt impressed then! To put the A shares deep enough to be fully covered resulted in horrible "pug" being pulled up. Settled for a depth that avoided that, but then the shares tended to sweep aside the available loose soil. But with a shallow spring tine pass ahead of drill, and another at an angle after drilling, the field at least looks nice, and 99% of seed is covered. What do people like about the Claydon? A lot of folk rate them.

  2. #2
    kwb
    Guest

    Re: Claydon disappointing

    Just been sowing wheat after rape today thought it would be too wet but was very surprised at the result it is a new hybrid drill the old sr certainley would not have done such a good job all seed was covered 2" and leading tines @5" travelling at 10 k with nh7040 I am a very happy banana tonight

  3. #3
    Krampeman
    Guest

    Re: Claydon disappointing

    Quote Originally Posted by redbaron View Post
    I had hoped to have a JD750 drilling for me today into my sticky untouched rape stubble. But 750 couldnt come, and I was too anxious to get the wheat drilled before another wetting... it will not take much more for this land to be impossible. So called in a Claydon. I hadnt used one for 4 years, and I now remember why I wasnt impressed then! To put the A shares deep enough to be fully covered resulted in horrible "pug" being pulled up. Settled for a depth that avoided that, but then the shares tended to sweep aside the available loose soil. But with a shallow spring tine pass ahead of drill, and another at an angle after drilling, the field at least looks nice, and 99% of seed is covered. What do people like about the Claydon? A lot of folk rate them.
    What you describe is what a claydon did on my soils every year we used it. Smearing the soil in anything but bone dry conditions and even then it couldn't penetrate to not having a proper coulter pressure system. It's not a heavy land tool, but then one mans 'heavy land' is the next 'boys land'!

  4. #4
    TC
    Guest

    Re: Claydon disappointing

    Know what you mean when it is wet - we are running a cultivator through first.
    As you describe the job it seems OK now, I think in most circumstances it can be the first machine into the field but not often the last.

  5. #5
    Col
    Guest

    Re: Claydon disappointing

    Twas never good on wet heavy land here, only really worked on lighter land. Just left a slot.

  6. #6
    Dalers
    Guest

    Re: Claydon disappointing

    Got 3m SR to try, drilled the OSR with it and it's not looking as I hoped but a good crop is often the thin one,Slugs are hammering it,I rolled it but the rolls only touch the banks and left the seed a bit loose(had the press wheels on) so slugs are loving it & is not growing much.I think its sat on hard shoulders & it did slot a bit.But it has been very wet and cold.

    Drilled some WB with it and did some with my Lemkin Combi on ploughing and on Min till and the Clayden looks a bit Scruffy & the combi looks great, but it's early days and will catch up I'm sure.
    I like the idea but feels like I might be saving 25 a acre on Ploughing etc but at the cost of yield & at 200 a ton I may be being Penny wise & Pound stupid.

    Tell you next Harvest.

  7. #7
    Devon James
    Guest

    Re: Claydon disappointing

    Quote Originally Posted by Dalers View Post
    Got 3m SR to try, drilled the OSR with it and it's not looking as I hoped but a good crop is often the thin one,Slugs are hammering it,I rolled it but the rolls only touch the banks and left the seed a bit loose(had the press wheels on) so slugs are loving it & is not growing much.I think its sat on hard shoulders & it did slot a bit.But it has been very wet and cold.

    Drilled some WB with it and did some with my Lemkin Combi on ploughing and on Min till and the Clayden looks a bit Scruffy & the combi looks great, but it's early days and will catch up I'm sure.
    I like the idea but feels like I might be saving 25 a acre on Ploughing etc but at the cost of yield & at 200 a ton I may be being Penny wise & Pound stupid.

    Tell you next Harvest.
    Really needs a following harrow on the back of it. I made one but its heavy.

  8. #8
    Clive
    Guest

    Re: Claydon disappointing

    I think a Claydon would have got crops in for us here ok, I would fear for the slug problems though as I have always felt it lacks a bit of consolidation and the slugs will love that this year

    with a better following harrow at least rolling would be effective but only if it's dry enough to get on with the rolls

  9. #9
    Willscale
    Guest

    Re: Claydon disappointing

    Two problems I see:

    1 - Lacks depth control on each coulter. So you can be too deep one side and too shallow the other if across a slope or in a rut

    2. Consolidation/closing/covering is a bit primitive

    BUT if you did your best to get your soil "better" then those problems wouldn't be so bad.

    dalers - generally its a bit more than saving 25 on ploughing. Tends to be about extending drilling window of opportunity, increasing soil OM, decreasing tractor hp/ha over time etc. these things count for a lot over time but can't be immedialty put in the margin.

  10. #10
    Dalers
    Guest

    Re: Claydon disappointing

    Yes Will I agree but I am just a bit twitchy at the moment,and yield is king for me as the savings are not massive unless you sell all your old kit,but as I said I like the idea & want it to work I just feel it's a little bit of a blunt instrument.

    But I take comfort in the fact that many hundreds of bigger & better farmers than me can't all be wrong,so fingers crossed.

  11. #11
    Joe Boy
    Guest

    Re: Claydon disappointing

    I was getting on well with my hybrid yesterday but was thinking I really need to change the front tine as it was really thin + on the top hole was only prob 50mm deeper than the A share. I put a new set on this morning and even on the shallowest setting the drill pulled up smeared clods of soil in the same field were it was working nicely yesterday.

    I think on wet soil a cultivator type drill is only going to do that really. I had to choose, run the thin/shallow tine = very little soil movement but one pass job, or put it deeper and have to wait to dry out and go back with harrows and rolls.

    As I have rain forecast for end of day and weekend I chose the former, I figured the job its doing is still more than the Dale/Aitchison/Seed Hawk type drills and lots of people used them and get good results.

    Fingers crossed it does not all sit under water all winter....

  12. #12
    Clive
    Guest

    Re: Claydon disappointing

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Boy View Post
    I was getting on well with my hybrid yesterday but was thinking I really need to change the front tine as it was really thin + on the top hole was only prob 50mm deeper than the A share. I put a new set on this morning and even on the shallowest setting the drill pulled up smeared clods of soil in the same field were it was working nicely yesterday.

    I think on wet soil a cultivator type drill is only going to do that really. I had to choose, run the thin/shallow tine = very little soil movement but one pass job, or put it deeper and have to wait to dry out and go back with harrows and rolls.

    As I have rain forecast for end of day and weekend I chose the former, I figured the job its doing is still more than the Dale/Aitchison/Seed Hawk type drills and lots of people used them and get good results.

    Fingers crossed it does not all sit under water all winter....
    think you did the right thing - anything at depth is doing more harm than good this year

  13. #13
    Johndeere
    Guest

    Re: Claydon disappointing

    Quote Originally Posted by Clive View Post
    I think a Claydon would have got crops in for us here ok, I would fear for the slug problems though as I have always felt it lacks a bit of consolidation and the slugs will love that this year

    with a better following harrow at least rolling would be effective but only if it's dry enough to get on with the rolls
    So a mzuri would do a better job?

  14. #14
    Clive
    Guest

    Re: Claydon disappointing

    Quote Originally Posted by Johndeere View Post
    So a mzuri would do a better job?
    I haven't tried one so wouldn't know !

  15. #15
    Longpod
    Guest

    Re: Claydon disappointing

    I have heard very little about the Mzuri. Cant they cope in the wet? I was meant to go and see a Mzuri Demo today but they never turned up

  16. #16
    Johndeere
    Guest

    Re: Claydon disappointing

    Quote Originally Posted by Clive View Post
    I haven't tried one so wouldn't know !
    I just think the with the coulter on an independent linkage seed depth will be more uniform and the following wheel will consolidate and help against the slugs

  17. #17
    Johndeere
    Guest

    Re: Claydon disappointing

    Quote Originally Posted by Longpod View Post
    I have heard very little about the Mzuri. Cant they cope in the wet? I was meant to go and see a Mzuri Demo today but they never turned up
    To be fair to them my sprinter wouldn't go today, so I doubt they wanted to come all the way to northants to watch it rain. Good test year for a new drill mind!

  18. #18
    Clive
    Guest

    Re: Claydon disappointing

    Quote Originally Posted by Johndeere View Post
    I just think the with the coulter on an independent linkage seed depth will be more uniform and the following wheel will consolidate and help against the slugs
    without doubt it has better depth control than the Claydon especially at width

    not sure how well the consolidation wheel works as no experience of it, if you can get good pressure on it without blocking or stalling it then it would work well I guess ??

  19. #19
    agricontract
    Guest

    Re: Claydon disappointing

    In wet soil does the wheel on the muzuri not cap soil off

  20. #20
    Andrew Kerr
    Guest

    Re: Claydon disappointing

    Quote Originally Posted by agricontract View Post
    In wet soil does the wheel on the muzuri not cap soil off
    I dont know about capping, its more of a job to stop the wheels behind the coulters filling up inside and jamming when its damp.

  21. #21
    Clive
    Guest

    Re: Claydon disappointing

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Kerr View Post
    I dont know about capping, its more of a job to stop the wheels behind the coulters filling up inside and jamming when its damp.
    how much have you got done now Andrew ?

  22. #22
    Andrew Kerr
    Guest

    Re: Claydon disappointing

    About 30%, but have now parked up as its silly wet.

  23. #23
    Johndeere
    Guest

    Re: Claydon disappointing

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Kerr View Post
    About 30%, but have now parked up as its silly wet.
    How many acres are you getting out of a set of points Andrew?

  24. #24
    Andrew Kerr
    Guest

    Re: Claydon disappointing

    Quote Originally Posted by Johndeere View Post
    How many acres are you getting out of a set of points Andrew?
    On rape we were getting approx 120, on wheat/ beans cant say as have got tungsten fitted to drill points now.

    TBH, i think its likely we will use an old KV tineseeder to try and finish with, its too wet for any wide bottomed coulter share drill right now, certainly on our soil.
    Will use it for beans with narrow shares on though.

  25. #25
    Niels
    Guest

    Re: Claydon disappointing

    I had the opportunity to do some demoing with a Claydon Hybrid over here in Holland last week for the factory. The soil was still plenty wet enough and on top of that we had another 3mm before drilling could start. However we had a go anyway and it went remarkably well. Drilled 210 kg/ha and seed covering was the biggest issue. However we had a day of fine drying weather on top and so it was rolled the day after which did a brilliant job. If it has been wetter we would have just tickled the surface with a power harrow going about an inch deep and very fast.

    The leading tine was in 8cm (3,2"). It did smear a lot of course but Claydon assure it will be fine. The slot didn't close at all so we had quite a bit of seed dropping into the bottom of the slot which will be lost. The A-share went in about half an inch, just into the soil. The seed has excellent soil contact and won't take long to germinate. Slug pellets have been spread of course as it will be a slugs heaven. Biggest issue was that wet soil was sticking to the paddles at the back. Tines would have been better but we didn't have any. This soil is some of the heaviest you'll find over here and usually takes a few passes with power harrows to bash it about. The rest of the field was Sumo'd and then drilled with a Rapid. I also drilled some field trials on a test/nursery farm for comparison between other (direct) drills.

    All in all everyone was impressed by the machine and the job it did despite less than ideal conditions. Ploughs and combi drills still do 90% of the drilling but getting out of fashion. With a 240 hp NH I was doing a gd 3 ha per hour using around 40 to 45 l/hr of diesel at 12 km/h. (14l/ha ish)

    Does anyone has any experience with drilling directly into cover crops, say mustard? Will it work or just horribly bung up and need topping before?

  26. #26
    Krampeman
    Guest

    Re: Claydon disappointing

    Quote Originally Posted by Johndeere View Post
    So a mzuri would do a better job?
    The only comparison between a Mzuri and Claydon is they both use tines. The Mzuri leading tine is far superior, as is the seeding coulter and press wheel. Having used one in the spring it consolidated very well and handled trash much better.

  27. #27
    spikeislander
    Guest

    Re: Claydon disappointing

    Currently spraying on a claydon farm battling with slugs and blackgrass.
    Correct me if I am wrong but isnt the basics for good pre em activity and good slug control a fine firm seedbed? I cant see how pulling up these clods and a small subsoiler tine through which doesnt go deep enough to remedy any harvest damage but which can then not be consolidated is at all sensible in current conditions. I understand the "system" but honestly I think there will be many a failure trying to make it work!!
    Not meant to sound as grumpy as it perhaps does.

  28. #28
    Niels
    Guest

    Re: Claydon disappointing

    Has anyone on here got experience about redrilling wheat with a Claydon? I have a friend whose headlands are all waterlodged and the wheat drowned. He is hoping for a dry spring and then redrill them with spring wheat. We were wondering if we could use the Claydon for it and put the tines a bit deeper so it removes compaction. Good idea or best to leave it and hope something will grow? There's no Moore, JD 750 or etc.. here so thats no option. His own option is a Kerner drill (like a Rapid) that won't touch the compaction. Would subsoiling prior to drilling be a better idea?

  29. #29
    Andrew Kerr
    Guest

    Re: Claydon disappointing

    Niels,

    If there is tilth you have a chance, but i would want it to be pretty dry or deeply frosted to have any realistic chance of relieving compaction TBH.

    Same applies to a Mzuri or Horsch in my view.

    Its so wet here now i doubt we will do any sensible work until spring anyway.

  30. #30
    Krampeman
    Guest

    Re: Claydon disappointing

    Quote Originally Posted by Niels View Post
    Has anyone on here got experience about redrilling wheat with a Claydon? I have a friend whose headlands are all waterlodged and the wheat drowned. He is hoping for a dry spring and then redrill them with spring wheat. We were wondering if we could use the Claydon for it and put the tines a bit deeper so it removes compaction. Good idea or best to leave it and hope something will grow? There's no Moore, JD 750 or etc.. here so thats no option. His own option is a Kerner drill (like a Rapid) that won't touch the compaction. Would subsoiling prior to drilling be a better idea?
    Yes I redrilled some osr in 2008 that failed due to ponding with a late wheat. I did half the field direct into the failed osr and half the field into solo'ed ground. The moved ground dried out quicker and returned a decent yield (3.5t/ac from memory) while the direct drilled stuff did not and was very weedy. Will need to dig out the yield map but I think it did around 2.7t/ac.

    In hindsight it was stupid trying because ponding only occurs if the soil is tight so I should of worked it all to release the water.

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