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Thread: wool price

  1. #31
    jackstor
    Guest

    Re: wool price

    Quote Originally Posted by llamedos View Post
    Looks like I should be well chuffed
    http://www.heraldscotland.com/mobile...602e440990f9fd

    </H1>
    Forecasting prices for a year in advance is always going to be difficult, but to advertise them in the farming press is very risky, if not foolhardy. "22p/kg more for this years wool" if I remember correctly? (it always seems rather bizarre to me that the BWMB uses members money to pay for adverts, advertising the estimated prices they will pay to members. A bit like EBLEX adverts, but thats another story!)
    The decline in the wool prices were forcast by others, but the BWMB blindly carried on making claims of potential wool prices, when it was fairly obvious, if they had looked at world prices, current stockpiles, etc, that these claims were unsusstainable.
    Now that the reality has hit home and it looks like the prices are going to be down 30%, I wonder if the chief excecutive who I think is on £148k, will take a 30% pay cut. I know the BWMB doesn't set the prices, so perhaps it's a bit harsh to knock £45k of the CE's wage, but surely to advertise those prices was a mistake.
    Unfortunatley, whichever way you sell your wool, it's less money in the farmer's pockets.

  2. #32
    Old Tip
    Guest

    Re: wool price

    Quote Originally Posted by hilly bill View Post
    I got my wool money paid straight into the bank, quite happy with what i got.

    So am i

    Just remember they take everybodys wool wether they want it or not, small flocks as well as big, just remember what happened when they got rid of the MMB.

    Divide and Conquer

  3. #33
    THE IRISH WOOL MAN
    Guest

    Re: wool price

    Frank, I see the revised payment forecast from the conference in Edinburgh on 9/11 stands at £0.80.
    Not one to say ‘I told you so’. Frank, we just call it as we see, not in anybody’s interest to put SPIN on true market conditions, in fact we think it was totally irresponsible to be issuing such off the wall predictions.
    Again, we offer a choice to the producers and thank those who stuck by us and we hope market conditions will improve for next season for all to benifit.

  4. #34
    Nithsdale farmer
    Guest

    Re: wool price

    Quote Originally Posted by jackstor View Post
    Forecasting prices for a year in advance is always going to be difficult, but to advertise them in the farming press is very risky, if not foolhardy. "22p/kg more for this years wool" if I remember correctly? (it always seems rather bizarre to me that the BWMB uses members money to pay for adverts, advertising the estimated prices they will pay to members. A bit like EBLEX adverts, but thats another story!)
    The decline in the wool prices were forcast by others, but the BWMB blindly carried on making claims of potential wool prices, when it was fairly obvious, if they had looked at world prices, current stockpiles, etc, that these claims were unsusstainable.
    Now that the reality has hit home and it looks like the prices are going to be down 30%, I wonder if the chief excecutive who I think is on £148k, will take a 30% pay cut. I know the BWMB doesn't set the prices, so perhaps it's a bit harsh to knock £45k of the CE's wage, but surely to advertise those prices was a mistake.
    Unfortunatley, whichever way you sell your wool, it's less money in the farmer's pockets.

    That is the HUGE problem with the wool board, and has been since forever.

    I do not, and will not grudge the men at the top being paid a wage - and i DO support the wool board. But IMO the wages must be in line with the wool prices and reflect a good or bad year.
    Too many years of us producers getting squat diddley whilst those at the top lined their pockets and saying "thats just the price of it" have went by.

    On another note i also feel the wool board KNOW what wool i produce year in - year out, so they could save a fecking fortune by dropping the catalouge every year and just tell me what MY wool should be wroth. Also get rid of the individually printed envelopes etc etc etc.
    Its my money your spending, id rather have it on the cheque as throwing it on the fire.

  5. #35
    jackstor
    Guest

    Re: wool price

    Quote Originally Posted by Nithsdale farmer View Post
    That is the HUGE problem with the wool board, and has been since forever.

    I do not, and will not grudge the men at the top being paid a wage - and i DO support the wool board. But IMO the wages must be in line with the wool prices and reflect a good or bad year.
    Too many years of us producers getting squat diddley whilst those at the top lined their pockets and saying "thats just the price of it" have went by.

    On another note i also feel the wool board KNOW what wool i produce year in - year out, so they could save a fecking fortune by dropping the catalouge every year and just tell me what MY wool should be wroth. Also get rid of the individually printed envelopes etc etc etc.
    Its my money your spending, id rather have it on the cheque as throwing it on the fire.
    Yep, when the price goes up, it's all to do with their marketing, advertising etc, yet when the price goes the other way, they all go very quiet....................

  6. #36
    wooly
    Guest

    Re: wool price

    http://www.ruralnewsgroup.co.nz/rura...-market-steady


    So why are the UK buying wool from New Zealand?

  7. #37
    Frank_the_Wool
    Guest

    Re: wool price

    Quote Originally Posted by wooly View Post
    http://www.ruralnewsgroup.co.nz/rura...-market-steady


    So why are the UK buying wool from New Zealand?
    It is a world market commodity and totally unsubsidised.

    Yes the price has fallen everywhere in the World, and in NZ even more in % terms than in the UK.
    British companies (scourers) buy wool from everywhere in the World to blend.

    NZ wool has a very good colour, it is very white and consistently so and for pale pastel coloured carpets and fabrics is an important ingredient.
    It is however less bulky and resilient than British Wool.
    I have mentioned before that the best carpets in the World are made from 40% British, 40% NZ and 20% Nylon!

    Over the last month prices everywhere have started to firm from falls of around 50% and it is essential to talk the market up. There are not large stocks of wool, but the manufacturing market is difficult so demand is sluggish and unfortunately falling oil prices have meant man made fibres getting cheaper.

    Those who criticise the BWMB and the staff should remember that the organisation is run democratically and the majority of the Board are sheep farmers. The pay of the CEO is probably on the low side for the boss of a company with a turnover in excess of £50 million and a staff of over 150.

    The latest BWMB sale yesterday saw a small fall in the price, but over 1.5 million kgs were sold, 70% of what was offered at auction.

    The "Campaign for Wool" is doing a tremendous promotion job around the world and I recommend everyone to look at the work it is doing. There are new items every day made out of wool on Facebook. The BWMB was behind the setting up of the CfW and is helping to fund and coordinate the world promotion. All wool sold through the BWMB helps to fund this work for the benefit of all wool producers, along with many other wool producing countries in the world.

    Ungraded wool sold outside of the Auction system depresses the price even more and could destabilise our unique and transparent marketing system.
    It contributes nothing to further promotion or the work the BWMB does in training sheep shearers!

    I am now retired from the BWMB but am still very aware of the important work it does for all sheep farmers/wool producers.

  8. #38
    Inbye
    Guest

    Re: wool price

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank_the_Wool View Post
    It is a world market commodity and totally unsubsidised.

    Yes the price has fallen everywhere in the World, and in NZ even more in % terms than in the UK.
    British companies (scourers) buy wool from everywhere in the World to blend.

    NZ wool has a very good colour, it is very white and consistently so and for pale pastel coloured carpets and fabrics is an important ingredient.
    It is however less bulky and resilient than British Wool.
    I have mentioned before that the best carpets in the World are made from 40% British, 40% NZ and 20% Nylon!

    Over the last month prices everywhere have started to firm from falls of around 50% and it is essential to talk the market up. There are not large stocks of wool, but the manufacturing market is difficult so demand is sluggish and unfortunately falling oil prices have meant man made fibres getting cheaper.

    Those who criticise the BWMB and the staff should remember that the organisation is run democratically and the majority of the Board are sheep farmers. The pay of the CEO is probably on the low side for the boss of a company with a turnover in excess of £50 million and a staff of over 150.

    Whilst the CEOs wage may 'be low' compared to other CEOs I find it hard to stomach that money knocked off my wool cheque for 'marketing costs' goes to someone on that wage!

    The latest BWMB sale yesterday saw a small fall in the price, but over 1.5 million kgs were sold, 70% of what was offered at auction.

    The "Campaign for Wool" is doing a tremendous promotion job around the world and I recommend everyone to look at the work it is doing. There are new items every day made out of wool on Facebook. The BWMB was behind the setting up of the CfW and is helping to fund and coordinate the world promotion. All wool sold through the BWMB helps to fund this work for the benefit of all wool producers, along with many other wool producing countries in the world.

    Ungraded wool sold outside of the Auction system depresses the price even more and could destabilise our unique and transparent marketing system.

    How? If you have mountain sheep such as blackies/swales that run on hard ground their wool will be of poor quality and downgraded. I'm afraid that if you have such wool it is better off going to a different merchant on a flat rate basis, plus you get paid there and then!

    It contributes nothing to further promotion or the work the BWMB does in training sheep shearers!

    You have to pay for shearing courses these days!

    I am now retired from the BWMB but am still very aware of the important work it does for all sheep farmers/wool producers.
    I use the wool board and am glad it exists but a little competition never hurt anyone.

  9. #39
    NeilO
    Guest

    Re: wool price

    Quote Originally Posted by Inbye View Post
    I use the wool board and am glad it exists but a little competition never hurt anyone.
    Exactly. Dairies buying direct didn't hurt the milk marque bandwagon at all.

  10. #40
    Frank_the_Wool
    Guest

    Re: wool price

    Quote Originally Posted by Inbye View Post
    I use the wool board and am glad it exists but a little competition never hurt anyone.
    I am sure we all agree about competition and if the Irish buyers wish to buy wool they can do so through the Auction at Bradford.

    The BWMB sells the wool on behalf of all wool producers at public auction.
    All wool producers receive the actual average auction price less the marketing costs.
    The Board has to accept wool from all producers with more than four fleeces wherever they may be in the British Isles.

    Those selling outside of the scheme do not realise that they may well depress the auction price. They also contribute nothing to shearing training or worldwide wool promotion.

  11. #41
    jackstor
    Guest

    Re: wool price

    Frank the Wool, although i'm convinced you are Peter "the king of spin" Mandelson in disguise!!
    I respect your opinions and your loyalty to the BWMB, and I'm sure the BWMB will be here for a lot of years to come, I'm equally sure the Irish merchants will be here too. The Irish have given farmers a choice of where to send their wool, some will always send it to BWMB, others will never send it there again and others will take their wool to where they think they will get most money for it.
    I would like you to clarify a couple of points-
    You keep talking about the transparency of the BWMB. Could you explain your meaning of the word 'transparent' please?
    To me, the 2 options, are either- phone an Irish depot,who will give you a price/kg, so you take it in, have it weighed, then you get your cheque within a few days.
    Or- look at what the BWMB are quoting for your wool (which is the top possible price before it is graded), take it to the depot, get a small % of money now,wait a year for the remainder of the value of your wool, the price of which you have to take, if you are not happy with the price, you can't take your wool back home. My view of transparency may be different to your's?


    At the end of the day, wool output per ewe is pretty minimal compared to lamb output per ewe, wool will be roughly £2-£3 per ewe per year? Lamb output will vary quite a lot, perhaps £100-£130? So obviously, most critical to profit margin per ewe is lamb price. Easily the most 'transparent' way to market your lambs, be it store, or fat is through the live auction mart ring, here you get the true market price on that day, if you are happy with that price, you sell your lambs and get your cheque that day, if your not happy with the price, you can pass them and market them another day of your choice. In my view, supporting this 'transparent' system is most important for the future well being of our sheep industry. I trust you sell all your livestock through the ring?

  12. #42
    Frank_the_Wool
    Guest

    Re: wool price

    Jackstor
    Firstly yes I do sell the majority of my livestock through the market.
    The small number I sell direct to butchers and other outlets will always be at a price that is not less than the market price.

    This is the problem with people selling outside of the BWMB and not through the auction system.
    Many farmers would not know what is the value of their wool and have sold it over the years for well below what it is worth. This drives down the auction price.

    Your comment about the BWMB "quoting" a price for wool is incorrect. The Board does NOT buy wool, it sells it on behalf of the producer at public auction.
    The wool is graded and packed from May to March the following year, but is offered for sale from June/July over 22 sales in the year.
    The price in the price schedule is the actual price the wool achieved at auction, less the marketing costs for each grade of wool.

    It is NOT the top price before it is graded, it is the actual price the producer receives for that grade of wool.

    That is transparent!

    The BWMB has an infrastructure that has to operate year in year out and has many skilled staff.
    The outside buyers come in for a few weeks, take some cheap wool, often packed in BWMB sheets and disappear again.

    They should be able to pay very high prices for wool, but they don't.

    They do not add any value to it by grading or promoting, preferring to sell it direct to low wage countries for them to add value or mixing it with lower quality wool to increase the overall value.
    This then drives down the value and prestige of British wool.

  13. #43
    Tim W
    Guest

    Re: wool price

    Quote Originally Posted by jackstor View Post
    At the end of the day, wool output per ewe is pretty minimal compared to lamb output per ewe, wool will be roughly £2-£3 per ewe per year? Lamb output will vary quite a lot, perhaps £100-£130? So obviously, most critical to profit margin per ewe is lamb price. Easily the most 'transparent' way to market your lambs, be it store, or fat is through the live auction mart ring, here you get the true market price on that day, if you are happy with that price, you sell your lambs and get your cheque that day, if your not happy with the price, you can pass them and market them another day of your choice. In my view, supporting this 'transparent' system is most important for the future well being of our sheep industry. I trust you sell all your livestock through the ring?
    EBLEX 2012 Average Farm Output
    Lamb £ Wool £
    115.89 1.63 Lowland
    105.53 1.71 LFA

    Wool is less than 2/5 of output for most producers

    I would support the view that both buyers are transparent---you know the score whichever route you take & certainly competition doesn't hurt

  14. #44
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    ireland
    Posts
    4

    Re: wool price

    1/05/2020
    A brief on fleece wool for this coming season:
    I think everybody is aware of the critical times we are going through and our wool trade is probably the most affected in the Agri-world.
    Farmers can shear their sheep as normal – but concerned for a lack of shearers as 20% of shearers come from Southern Hemisphere – could be an opportunity for the local lads!. They can deliver their wool to their selling points but not to hang around – unload, get your weight docket and speedily leave.
    Markets are non-existence at present – Both Bradford scouring plants are closed mainly because the spinners are closed as the carpet manufacturers and other end users are – the chain reaction.
    China is still out of the market in the main – as our wools are out of fashion currently. Our wools are 30 to 35micron and can only be spun to a heavy count of knitting yarn i.e. Aran or Chunky weights. Up to 5 or 6 years our wools were manufactured into yarns and sent to the provinces for hand knitting into heavy garments and we could sell 1,000’s of tons. Now huge numbers of these folk have moved into centrally heated tower blocks in new cities and no longer require heavy garments – hence light weights made from Merino wool is all the rage and merino prices are at an all-time high.
    We, as Laurence Pierce (Wool Merchants) Ltd, having c. 15% of the English fleece wool market, face a never before seen future. We sell our wools 33% forward by 1st of June zero sold to date – balance on the spot market – will there be one?
    Our options: we will be in a position to receive wool at our 35 intake points until we run out of space unless the chain is open by then. We will have to speculate on what the price might be but it will be very low. We may have to offer to make a price when we get a price!
    Our customers received between 50 & 60p prompt payment last season!
    It’s a shame to see the wool business as a waste disposal business. The commodity that built Great Britain over 3 centuries. A few more tweed jackets, Aran sweaters or square meters of carpets is not going to solve the problem – we must think outside the box and come up with new uses to take up large volumes of our wools.
    Vincent Pierce. M.D.
    Laurence Pierce (Wool Merchants) Ltd.

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