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Thread: Copper pipe corrosion

  1. #1
    Ad
    Guest

    Copper pipe corrosion

    Second corroded pipe in a month what's causing it? seems to be external the first was caused by a corroded screw the pipe was resting against so fair enough but this pipe is under 10yr old some of the pipes in the cottage will be over 50yr old and they are fine, there's no known issue with the water, kettles never fir up.

  2. #2
    Deereone
    Guest

    Re: Copper pipe corrosion

    Looks like impurities in the copper. You will get corrosion around the joints if the flux isn't cleaned off properly.

  3. #3
    cowcalf
    Guest

    Re: Copper pipe corrosion

    Some modern pipe is very thin walled compared to old stuff

  4. #4
    pycoed
    Guest

    Re: Copper pipe corrosion

    If you are on spring water, then it may be very acidic. Ours is, & will eat copper like that in around 10 years - kettle never firs up but does show dark brown deposits. The old pipes in the cottage may be hot water pipes, or at least non rising main pipes, & therefore not subject to fresh acidic water all the time.

  5. #5
    J_B
    Guest

    Re: Copper pipe corrosion

    In the mid 80s there was a lot of dodgy Chinese pipe on the market - we had some in our house

    Dunno if any more has slipped through the net?

  6. #6
    RGSP
    Guest

    Re: Copper pipe corrosion

    Quote Originally Posted by J_B View Post
    In the mid 80s there was a lot of dodgy Chinese pipe on the market - we had some in our house

    Dunno if any more has slipped through the net?
    Some of it may well have been Chinese, but most was made in the UK. The problem is that soft copper seamless tubing has to be extruded through a nozzle, with a sort of expander in the middle. The nozzle needs lubrication, which is done by graphite, and occasionally the graphite clags up into lumps, which then break off and get included into the tubing. The inclusions are big enough to initiate very small leaks, which then grow.

    As far as I know (and I may be out of date on this) there is no magic way round the problem. Not drawing too much tubing before dismantling the whole machine and cleaning/polishing the nozzle certainly helps, but that's an expensive thing to do, and manufacturers are under constant pressure to cut costs. Another good partial answer is careful inspection of every single length of tubing produced, using both visual and other methods, but that ain't cheap either.

    There's a lot to be said for plastic tubing - IF it's suitable for your application.

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