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Thread: Post and rail fence

  1. #1
    ajmoore1
    Guest

    Post and rail fence

    Hi,

    I have been asked to put up a post and rail fence and was thinking of investing in an auger drive and 12inch bit for our mini digger. The digger is a 1.5 ton Takeuchi, has anyone got any experience of using these with an auger? I have hired a hand held stihl one and that was pretty hard work on your own. Have got a tractor mounted post knocker a (quantock pd5) but always find with square posts they twist and can't get them accurate enough. Is it possible to knock the square post in with a knocker apart from a bryce. Any advice welcome as I don't fancy hand digging.

    Cheers

    Jon

  2. #2
    s j h
    Guest

    Re: Post and rail fence

    I don't think a 1.5 tonne will be man enough for an auger to lift out.

    We always knock post and rail in unless stated otherwise. Use blunt or 2 way pointed posts. Knock your end posts in first, pull out 2.5mm mild wire as a line and temporarily strain, this is better than string as it will ping back to line, it will also give you your height. Mark the middle of a rail to give your distance between posts. The key is not to have 4 way pointed posts as they will move and twist of line. Blunts are the way to do it if you can get hold of them. Not using a Bruce by the way, using a Protech.

  3. #3
    davidroberts30
    Guest

    Re: Post and rail fence

    best way with a banger is to hit the posts in a little narrower than the lenght of the railsyes i know you have to trim every rail but its easier to trim them than lenghten them
    that way if a post hits rock and leans a bit the rail will still fit

  4. #4
    Derky
    Guest

    Re: Post and rail fence

    Usually put an auger on a 2.5 or 3 tonne. Depends on the going should think they would push slither in at the minute.

  5. #5
    RGSP
    Guest

    Re: Post and rail fence

    For 3" x 5" "motorway" squared posts, a 6" auger is enough with care over positioning and verticality, and a 1.5 tonner should be able to cope with that. 12" is another matter.

    In fact if I've only got a few to do, I use a very cheap and nasty 6" hand auger, but it works very nicely on our clay soil.

  6. #6
    james d geoghegan
    Guest

    Re: Post and rail fence

    I worked on post and rail fencing along motorways , our output was 1km/day average , boring holes is a waste of time and its not possible to get them firm enough , we lay out the rails end to end , put a wire line on the corner posts , mark the rails at half way , then crowbar a pilot hole for every post , have a chalk mark on the post to the height of the wire for depth control , then have a homemade clamp about 5ft long that fits in on to the post , we hold the post with this and if it starts to twist we can twist it back , this gives perfect square posts all the time , that thing of cutting rails is not a good job as it lets water in to fresh cut timber, it also wastes time and timber.

  7. #7
    andy26
    Guest

    Re: Post and rail fence

    I used to have a 1.5 ton Cat and a 250mm (10") auger. On easy ground you could make a hole in under a minute, but if the grounds hard or there's stone, rock, tree roots etc. it could take upto 20 minutes a hole.

    For tough ground conditions you really want a heavy machine, 2.5t+ is ideal. The problem being you can't get enough downwards pressure on the auger.
    I've used a 12" auger on a JCB Loadall and it made holes effortlessly even through stone.

    Saying all that, you get a much firmer post with machine driven posts and its so much quicker and easier, hence I now use this:



    The posts should be 1.8m apart, I put them in at 1.775m (an inch short), you end up cutting a few, but its much easier than trying to make rails longer!

  8. #8
    davidroberts30
    Guest

    Re: Post and rail fence

    Quote Originally Posted by james d geoghegan View Post
    I worked on post and rail fencing along motorways , our output was 1km/day average , boring holes is a waste of time and its not possible to get them firm enough , we lay out the rails end to end , put a wire line on the corner posts , mark the rails at half way , then crowbar a pilot hole for every post , have a chalk mark on the post to the height of the wire for depth control , then have a homemade clamp about 5ft long that fits in on to the post , we hold the post with this and if it starts to twist we can twist it back , this gives perfect square posts all the time , that thing of cutting rails is not a good job as it lets water in to fresh cut timber, it also wastes time and timber.
    so all you rails get delivered the exact same lenght
    round here there could be up to 1.5-2 inch difference

  9. #9
    james d geoghegan
    Guest

    Re: Post and rail fence

    Quote Originally Posted by davidroberts30 View Post
    so all you rails get delivered the exact same lenght
    round here there could be up to 1.5-2 inch difference
    Yes 5.8m long , we were working to goverment specs so there was no room for error, I have seen fencing having to be taken down and put up again because they cut the rails , Ive seen one job where the lads took short cuts and far out of rail so they put in half rails to fill the gap but ended up with all four joints on the one post , when the engineer copped it , it all had to be replaced , miles of it .

  10. #10
    Mr Muck
    Guest

    Re: Post and rail fence

    When I did our garden fence, approx 70m we used a post chapper and made a holder that fitted the mast, plumbed the mast and banged in the post, some did shift out of line after hitting rock but we just pushed them straight an wedged them up with stone. Small bit I did on other side of house I just hand dug holes and concreted the posts in, was prob easier tbh.

  11. #11
    james d geoghegan
    Guest

    Re: Post and rail fence

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Muck View Post
    When I did our garden fence, approx 70m we used a post chapper and made a holder that fitted the mast, plumbed the mast and banged in the post, some did shift out of line after hitting rock but we just pushed them straight an wedged them up with stone. Small bit I did on other side of house I just hand dug holes and concreted the posts in, was prob easier tbh.
    concrete around timber posts is not a great job as it holds the moister in to the timber , definitly dont seal in the bottoms of them

  12. #12
    treeman
    Guest

    Re: Post and rail fence

    s j h; long since retired from contract fencing but it's nice to see quality work like that.

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