Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234
Results 91 to 108 of 108

Thread: Claydon hybrid wet weather kit

  1. #91
    ianfelts
    Guest

    Re: Claydon hybrid wet weather kit

    Quote Originally Posted by Clive View Post
    but you must see that for example a 750a is doing something totally different to a Claydon however ?

    you can't call them both direct drills when they do different things or no wonder people get confused about all this !
    You are right all these drill are very different but they all open up the soil one way or another and then create a slot/groove in which seed is placed. Most open the soil vertically and then place seed vertically whilst others place the seed with some kind of share horizontally.
    The wet weather kit is using the vertical method for both and relies upon the aggressive lead tine action to loosen the soil each side of the 'slot' to create an easy path for the spring tines to penetrate.
    IMO all these types can be identified as Direct drills (not conventional drills) but the amount of work each does as you suggest is quite different, and requires quite different HP to pull them.

  2. #92
    Clive
    Guest

    Re: Claydon hybrid wet weather kit

    Quote Originally Posted by ianfelts View Post
    You are right all these drill are very different but they all open up the soil one way or another and then create a slot/groove in which seed is placed. Most open the soil vertically and then place seed vertically whilst others place the seed with some kind of share horizontally.
    The wet weather kit is using the vertical method for both and relies upon the aggressive lead tine action to loosen the soil each side of the 'slot' to create an easy path for the spring tines to penetrate.
    IMO all these types can be identified as Direct drills (not conventional drills) but the amount of work each does as you suggest is quite different, and requires quite different HP to pull them.
    The point I'm trying to make though is that a low disturbance dd will over time allow soil to structure itself as Will suggests this is often overlooked and not well understood especially in the UK

    Drills that till more such as Claydon etc will never allow this to happen so only offer potential saving is that of one pass ( which is significant ) and maybe small yield increases

    IMO Claydon type drills are for people who want to save money, they do hat very well when they work, Low disturbance dd is for those looking for more than fixed cost savings who are considering soil biology, water and nutrient availability, cultural weed control and sustainability within there farming system, it's a LOT more complex than just reducing establishment passes by one

  3. #93
    Willscale
    Guest

    Re: Claydon hybrid wet weather kit

    Quote Originally Posted by doorknob View Post
    But that wont happen either as the absolute extremists, wont give at all and will continue to create confusion in the matter.
    No till = no till. 75%+ soil and pant cover remaining.

    Whats the problem?

  4. #94
    ianfelts
    Guest

    Re: Claydon hybrid wet weather kit

    Quote Originally Posted by Clive View Post
    The point I'm trying to make though is that a low disturbance dd will over time allow soil to structure itself as Will suggests this is often overlooked and not well understood especially in the UK

    Drills that till more such as Claydon etc will never allow this to happen so only offer potential saving is that of one pass ( which is significant ) and maybe small yield increases

    IMO Claydon type drills are for people who want to save money, they do hat very well when they work, Low disturbance dd is for those looking for more than fixed cost savings who are considering soil biology, water and nutrient availability, cultural weed control and sustainability within there farming system, it's a LOT more complex than just reducing establishment passes by one
    All Direct drills do a very simple job,they plant the seed. They all do it differently and at various costs. All have an impact on soil biology, water and nutrient availability, cultural weed control and sustainability. Clearly some drills impact some things more than others but they do affect all of them, not just fixed costs.

  5. #95
    doorknob
    Guest

    Re: Claydon hybrid wet weather kit

    Quote Originally Posted by Willscale View Post
    No till = no till. 75%+ soil and pant cover remaining.

    Whats the problem?
    I give up, what is the problem?

    I agree, no-till is no-till. I would even go so far as to say that IMO,<<<<O is for Opinion, the 75% is low. So I may even be called an extremist because of that. But the "extremists" that I refer to are ones that will not allow even the smallest bit of rotational tillage no matter what.

    An example. The corn harvest turns wet and the combines and carts make ruts. No matter what anyone looking in from the outside might think, it was unavoidable. Yet, there will be those that will tell that farmer he ruined his no-till operations, and that if he levels the ruts using any form of tillage whatsoever, he can no longer be considered a no-till farmer.

    Those are the bible thumping, pulpit pounders that I call extremists.

    I do what I can to not use the word no-till when describing planting using disturbance methods. I try to keep that descriptive word kept as well as I can to describe only the least disturbance tools and methods. I am full aware that there is more to it than kit. But that is for another topic. IMO.

  6. #96
    Willscale
    Guest

    Re: Claydon hybrid wet weather kit

    Quote Originally Posted by doorknob View Post
    I give up, what is the problem?

    I agree, no-till is no-till. I would even go so far as to say that IMO,<<<<O is for Opinion, the 75% is low. So I may even be called an extremist because of that. But the "extremists" that I refer to are ones that will not allow even the smallest bit of rotational tillage no matter what.

    An example. The corn harvest turns wet and the combines and carts make ruts. No matter what anyone looking in from the outside might think, it was unavoidable. Yet, there will be those that will tell that farmer he ruined his no-till operations, and that if he levels the ruts using any form of tillage whatsoever, he can no longer be considered a no-till farmer.

    Those are the bible thumping, pulpit pounders that I call extremists.

    I do what I can to not use the word no-till when describing planting using disturbance methods. I try to keep that descriptive word kept as well as I can to describe only the least disturbance tools and methods. I am full aware that there is more to it than kit. But that is for another topic. IMO.
    Err, I think you are working yourself into a bit of a lather with respect.


    I think every farmer would say you have to do what you have to do. Some people would say if you have ruts tidy them up, some would say leave them be and they will even up a bit over time. I think it depends on how deep the ruts are. Some would say fill them in.

    Was it really unavoidable? Maybe not? Maybe there are other ways?

    An extremist no tiller as you call them would probably make more effort to plan for the possible scenarios and so if they were faced with very wet conditions maybe they would look to spend more on drains, or maybe not harvest their crop when others would, or maybe use better tyres, lighter combines etc. because to them they would focus their whole system around no till which is not just the act of not tilling the soil if that makes any sense. But it wouldn't make them irrational, it would just be more about thinking and planning in advance.

    For the record I don't have ruts in my fields but my tillage neighbours do. So they may need to plough to remove ruts. I may have other problems they don't however. Each to their own but unless you ask questions of the evolving techniques how do you know it can't be done?


    Whats all this bible and preaching stuff?

  7. #97
    agricontract
    Guest

    Re: Claydon hybrid wet weather kit

    this is the best picture i have of the twin/ tripple tine set up i think it will do what i need to do in a year like this i.e keep seed away from the water flowing down the slot the lead tine creates
    they are also doing a kit to use ski boards and harrow tines at the same time which should close the slot better and do away with straw raking after drilling in wet conditions

  8. #98
    agricontract
    Guest

    Re: Claydon hybrid wet weather kit

    this is my wet weather kit

  9. #99
    Feldspar
    Guest

    Re: Claydon hybrid wet weather kit

    Quote Originally Posted by agricontract View Post
    this is the best picture i have of the twin/ tripple tine set up i think it will do what i need to do in a year like this i.e keep seed away from the water flowing down the slot the lead tine creates
    they are also doing a kit to use ski boards and harrow tines at the same time which should close the slot better and do away with straw raking after drilling in wet conditions
    We made our own combination of these two. It is possible use either or both. Harrows without ski boards works well in the wet and stops the drill blocking.

  10. #100
    agricontract
    Guest

    Re: Claydon hybrid wet weather kit

    You have a photo ?

  11. #101
    doorknob
    Guest

    Re: Claydon hybrid wet weather kit

    Quote Originally Posted by Willscale View Post
    Err, I think you are working yourself into a bit of a lather with respect.


    I think every farmer would say you have to do what you have to do. Some people would say if you have ruts tidy them up, some would say leave them be and they will even up a bit over time. I think it depends on how deep the ruts are. Some would say fill them in.

    Was it really unavoidable? Maybe not? Maybe there are other ways?

    An extremist no tiller as you call them would probably make more effort to plan for the possible scenarios and so if they were faced with very wet conditions maybe they would look to spend more on drains, or maybe not harvest their crop when others would, or maybe use better tyres, lighter combines etc. because to them they would focus their whole system around no till which is not just the act of not tilling the soil if that makes any sense. But it wouldn't make them irrational, it would just be more about thinking and planning in advance.

    For the record I don't have ruts in my fields but my tillage neighbours do. So they may need to plough to remove ruts. I may have other problems they don't however. Each to their own but unless you ask questions of the evolving techniques how do you know it can't be done?


    Whats all this bible and preaching stuff?
    Believe it or not, I actually think I can agree with you on this.

    Unavoidable, does exist, at least for the first time thru. Once the farmer sees that this can happen and may happen again, means to reduce or eliminate it should be followed up on. IMO. I think we agree on that?

    However, at least "here", as much as some may wish to make "no-till" work, even at the risk of reducing the net dollar a bit, there has to be a market for the product. We dont have the markets that many around the world do. That's not saying that others do not face the same lack of markets, just that an extremist, will not take that into consideration. Again, as individuals, we will all have our definition of extremist, mostly based on the local environment of doing business, without regard for the possibility that others may not have the same markets and rotations available. IMO.

    The bible thumping, pulpit pounders are those that choose to throw insults at failures rather than factual alternatives. Again, they do exist, like it or not. Please dont think that I am aiming any of those at you personally, just for the record.

  12. #102
    doorknob
    Guest

    Re: Claydon hybrid wet weather kit

    Quote Originally Posted by agricontract View Post
    this is the best picture i have of the twin/ tripple tine set up i think it will do what i need to do in a year like this i.e keep seed away from the water flowing down the slot the lead tine creates
    they are also doing a kit to use ski boards and harrow tines at the same time which should close the slot better and do away with straw raking after drilling in wet conditions
    I tried to screen shot from youtube and could not get anything clear. I did notice that the drill did not block up even when the tractor wheels were pushing muck to the sides. That was impressive to me.

  13. #103
    Feldspar
    Guest

    Re: Claydon hybrid wet weather kit

    Quote Originally Posted by agricontract View Post
    You have a photo ?
    I'll have a go. Need to find a working camera first though.

  14. #104
    agricontract
    Guest

    Re: Claydon hybrid wet weather kit

    @ doorknob that is a YouTube screen shot
    @ feldspar thanks

  15. #105
    doorknob
    Guest

    Re: Claydon hybrid wet weather kit

    Quote Originally Posted by agricontract View Post
    @ doorknob that is a YouTube screen shot
    @ feldspar thanks
    I kinda thought so as that was about the same time I was trying to capture one and the hoses are the same color.

    Sorry about getting a little off topic there for a bit.

  16. #106
    Kentish_Andy
    Guest

    Re: Claydon hybrid wet weather kit

    Quote Originally Posted by Feldspar View Post
    We made our own combination of these two. It is possible use either or both. Harrows without ski boards works well in the wet and stops the drill blocking.
    I found ski boards useless in wet as blocked up so I do not see point of combining both in the wet. We just run the harrows in all conditions. Still think ski boards are a waste of time.

  17. #107
    Feldspar
    Guest

    Re: Claydon hybrid wet weather kit

    Quote Originally Posted by Kentish_Andy View Post
    I found ski boards useless in wet as blocked up so I do not see point of combining both in the wet. We just run the harrows in all conditions. Still think ski boards are a waste of time.
    Agree. Ski boards are rarely used.

  18. #108
    ianfelts
    Guest

    Re: Claydon hybrid wet weather kit

    Quote Originally Posted by Kentish_Andy View Post
    I found ski boards useless in wet as blocked up so I do not see point of combining both in the wet. We just run the harrows in all conditions. Still think ski boards are a waste of time.
    I modified my ski boards to so they are in 2 rows rather than one, also boards are only 4" wide. I only direct drilling Beans and OSR at the moment. I'm planning on building another drill for wheat and was considering combining a ski board and harrow set up. It's interesting to here other views before i spend any money !!!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •