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Thread: TB in goats

  1. #1
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    TB in goats

    I heard to today that a large number ( half the herd ? ) of milking goats have been slaughtered after failing a tb test ( I assume this was the skin test ) This followed post mortums on animals that were failing to thrive . Most of the animals were bought in and came from the midlands . Some of the existing stock were also infected .

    Devastating for the farm concerned , especially as this area is crying out for more goats milk and the price is high and devastating that TB is in another livestock sector and the powers that be are not dealing with the wildlife source .


    Following on from last year's revelation that many cull ewes in Herefordshire had tb lesions this has to put a rocket under somebody surely ?
    loose does not rhyme with choose but lose does and is the word you meant to write

  2. #2
    Senior Member Joyce's Avatar
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    Re: TB in goats

    Quote Originally Posted by arf View Post

    Following on from last year's revelation that many cull ewes in Herefordshire had tb lesions this has to put a rocket under somebody surely ?
    I doubt it Quite a few years ago the rare Golden Guernseys were thought to be threatened with extinction due to zTB.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Joyce's Avatar
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    Re: TB in goats

    Cut and paste from my yahoo goat group run by Christine Ball, Staffordshire


    http://www.cresa.es/cresa3/default.a...83762891722755

    Tested successfully anew vaccine against tuberculosis that improves the protection
    CReSA researchers have tested for the firsttime and successfully the new vaccine, designed at the Jenner Institute (UK).The study has been conducted using domestic goats, which reproduce activetuberculosis in humans with a high similitude. The new vaccine acts byreinforcing the efficacy of the BCG vaccine, the only one available to date.
    A vaccine that reinforces the efficacy ofthe only vaccine available nowadays.
    In the last 90 years, only one vaccine againsttuberculosis has been marketed across the world, the so-called BCG (BacillusCalmette-Guérin), but its efficacy is quite limited and a number of researchgroups are working with the aim of finding a universal vaccine that replaces orreinforces it.
    Now, researchers of CReSA have completed the firstnon-clinical study for a new vaccine against tuberculosis, known as AdTBF, avaccine based in a recombinant, non-pathogenic virus that expresses fourproteins of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (the agent that causestuberculosis). The study was designed by Dr Bernat Pérez de Val and Dr MarianoDomingo, professor also at the Departament d’Anatomia I Sanitat Animals(department of animal anatomy and health) of UAB, and has been conducted incollaboration with researchers from the Jenner Institute, who designed thevaccine, and from the Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency from theUnited Kingdom –both research institutes being leaders worldwide in vaccinedevelopment.
    The experiments, conducted at CReSA’s level 3biosafety facilities, have allowed to prove that goats inoculated with BCG andsubsequently with the new AdTBF vaccine show a higher protection againsttuberculosis than those inoculated only with BCG. In particular, the new vaccinereinforces the immune system against tuberculosis infection decreasing lesionsand bacteria replication.

    The goat, a fitting model for studying newanti-tuberculosis treatments and vaccines
    The animal species selected for this first studywas the domestic goat, which is a suitable animal model for studying newtreatments and vaccines against tuberculosis, and with which CReSA researchershave been working on the last few years.
    The animal models usually used in research, such asthe mouse or the guinea pig, are a problem in that they do not reproduce thelesions characteristic of human tuberculosis, and end up dying due to a rapidprogression of the infection instead of reproducing a chronic process as ithappens in humans and big mammals. Therefore, it is necessary to use a biganimal model which better reproduces what happens in the human being.
    While the goat reproduces the pathologicalcharacteristics and immune response to active tuberculosis infection in humanswith a high similitude, it is also a natural host of tuberculosis and thus, fromthe animal health point of view and since tuberculosis is endemic in goats inmany countries, this model allows studying the potential use of the vaccine infarm animals as well.
    The studyhas been recently published in the journal PLOS ONE: A multi-antigenic adenoviral-vectored vaccine improves BCG-inducedprotection of goats against pulmonary tuberculosis infection and preventsdisease progression. B. Pérez de Val, E. Vidal, B. Villarreal-Ramos, S. C.Gilbert, A. Andaluz, X. Moll, M. Martín, M. Nofrarías, H. McShane, H. M.Vordermeier y M. Domingo. PLOS ONE 8: e81317.

  4. #4
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    Re: TB in goats

    The trouble is that goats do not have to be routinely tested, unlike cattle, unless they are in contact with cattle when a vet comes to do their testing. This means that there is a large untested goat population that could be harbouring the disease.

  5. #5
    Senior Member matthew's Avatar
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    Re: TB in goats

    So as with BCG, a two tiered vaccination in goats (which in badgers, is said to stop zTB in its tracks in X years) does not actually prevent tuberculosis at all.

    "In particular, the new vaccine reinforces the immune system against tuberculosis infection, decreasing lesions and bacteria replication."

    The animal still has tuberculosis, still has lesions, and still sheds bacteria from them albeit in smaller doses?

    Yes Arf, goats can and do pick up ztuberculosis bacteria, as can any mammals which come into contact with m.bovis.
    It isn't a 'bovine' problem after all.

    http://bovinetb.blogspot.co.uk/2013/...or-george.html

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